Search results for 'Elizabeth A. Corley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ben A. Minteer, Elizabeth A. Corley & Robert E. Manning (2004). Environmental Ethics Beyond Principle? The Case for a Pragmatic Contextualism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):131-156.score: 1410.0
    Many nonanthropocentric environmental ethicists subscribe to a ``principle-ist'''' approach to moral argument, whereby specific natural resource and environmental policy judgments are deduced from the prior articulation of a general moral principle. More often than not, this principle is one requiring the promotion of the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. Yet there are several problems with this method of moral reasoning, including the short-circuiting of reflective inquiry and the disregard of the complex nature of specific environmental problems and policy arguments. In (...)
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  2. Ben A. Minteer & Elizabeth A. Corley (2007). Conservation or Preservation? A Qualitative Study of the Conceptual Foundations of Natural Resource Management. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (4):307-333.score: 1410.0
    Few disputes in the annals of US environmentalism enjoy the pedigree of the conservation-preservation debate. Yet, although many scholars have written extensively on the meaning and history of conservation and preservation in American environmental thought and practice, the resonance of these concepts outside the academic literature has not been sufficiently examined. Given the significance of the ideals of conservation and preservation in the justification of environmental policy and management, however, we believe that a more detailed analysis of the real-world use (...)
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  3. Mary C. Corley (2002). Nurse Moral Distress: A Proposed Theory and Research Agenda. Nursing Ethics 9 (6):636-650.score: 420.0
    As professionals, nurses are engaged in a moral endeavour, and thus confront many challenges in making the right decision and taking the right action. When nurses cannot do what they think is right, they experience moral distress that leaves a moral residue. This article proposes a theory of moral distress and a research agenda to develop a better understanding of moral distress, how to prevent it, and, when it cannot be prevented, how to manage it.
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  4. Daniel P. Johnson, Mark A. Whisman, Robin P. Corley, John K. Hewitt & Naomi P. Friedman (forthcoming). Genetic and Environmental Influences on Rumination and its Covariation with Depression. Cognition and Emotion:1-17.score: 280.0
  5. Lenora D. Wolfgang (1991). Corin FV Corley, The Second Continuation of the Old French Perceval: A Critical and Lexicographical Study.(MHRA Texts and Dissertations, 24.) London: Modern Humanities Research Association, 1987. Paper. Pp. Vii, 193. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):388-389.score: 120.0
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  6. Ann B. Hamric (2012). Empirical Research on Moral Distress: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (1):39-49.score: 24.0
    Abstract Studying a concept as complex as moral distress is an ongoing challenge for those engaged in empirical ethics research. Qualitative studies of nurses have illuminated the experience of moral distress and widened the contours of the concept, particularly in the area of root causes. This work has led to the current understanding that moral distress can arise from clinical situations, factors internal to the individual professional, and factors present in unit cultures, the institution, and the larger health care environment. (...)
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  7. Bernadette Pauly, Colleen Varcoe, Janet Storch & Lorelei Newton (2009). Registered Nurses' Perceptions of Moral Distress and Ethical Climate. Nursing Ethics 16 (5):561-573.score: 24.0
    Moral distress is a phenomenon of increasing concern in nursing practice, education and research. Previous research has suggested that moral distress is associated with perceptions of ethical climate, which has implications for nursing practice and patient outcomes. In this study, a randomly selected sample of registered nurses was surveyed using Corley’s Moral Distress Scale and Olson’s Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS). The registered nurses reported moderate levels of moral distress intensity. Moral distress intensity and frequency were found to be (...)
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