Search results for 'Elizabeth A. Herdman RN Ba Social Science PhD' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth A. Herdman RN Ba Social Science PhD (2001). The Illusion of Progress in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):4–13.score: 15570.0
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  2. Elizabeth A. Herdman RN BA PhD (2004). Nursing in a Postemotional Society. Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):95–103.score: 7492.5
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  3. Karin M. E. Dahlberg Rn Phd & M. A. Dahlberg (2004). Description Vs. Interpretation – a New Understanding of an Old Dilemma in Human Science Research. Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):268–273.score: 3480.0
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  4. K. M. Baker M. A. PhD (1964). The Early History of the Term 'Social Science'. Annals of Science 20 (3):211-226.score: 3150.0
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  5. PhD, Gina Browne RegN PhD, Jacqueline Roberts RegN MSc, Amiram Gafni PhD & Carolyn Byrne RegN PhD (2002). The 2‐Year Costs and Effects of a Public Health Nursing Case Management Intervention on Mood‐Disordered Single Parents on Social Assistance. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):45-59.score: 1380.0
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  6. Mary-ann R. Hardcastle Rn Ba Diped Mphtm Phd, Kim J. Usher Rn Rpn Dne Dhs Ba Mnst Phd & Colin A. Holmes Rmhn Ba Phd (2005). An Overview of Structuration Theory and its Usefulness for Nursing Research. Nursing Philosophy 6 (4):223–234.score: 1310.0
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  7. Robyn Bluhm (2012). Elizabeth Ben-Ishai is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Albion College. Her Research Focuses on Feminist Political Theory, Theories of Autonomy, and Social Welfare Service Delivery. Her Recent Publications Include Fostering Autonomy: A Theory of Citizenship, the State, and Social Service Delivery (2012). [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2).score: 960.0
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  8. Mary Elizabeth Kochan (1998). A Post Modern Critique. Relevant Social Science : Making Sense of the Story. In Barbara L. Neuby (ed.), Relevancy of the Social Sciences in the Next Millennium. The State University of West Georgia.score: 592.0
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  9. Jessica Smith Rolston, Skylar Huzyk Zilliox, Corinne Packard, Carl Mitcham & Brian Zaharatos (2014). Nanoethics and Policy Education: A Case Study of Social Science Coursework and Student Engagement with Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 8 (3):217-225.score: 582.8
    The article analyzes the integration of a module on nanotechnology, ethics, and policy into a required second-year social science course at a technological university. It investigates not simply the effectiveness of student learning about the technical aspects of nanotechnology but about how issues explored in an interdisciplinary social science course might influence student opinions about the potential of nanotechnology to benefit the developing world. The authors find a correlation between student opinions about the risks and benefits (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Uses of Value Judgments in Feminist Social Science: A Case Study of Research on Divorce. Hypatia 19 (1):1-24.score: 567.0
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  11. Terence Rajivan Edward (2013). A Challenge to Social Constructivism About Science. Ethos 6 (2):150-156.score: 558.0
    This paper presents a challenge to the coherence of social constructivism about science. It introduces an objection according to which social constructivism appeals to the authority of science regarding the nature of reality and so cannot coherently deny that authority. The challenge is how to avoid this incoherence.
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  12. Josef Feigenberg & John Heilbron (2002). Sharon Bailin is a Professor in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser Uni-Versity. Her BA (Hons) Was in Philosophy From the University of Toronto, and Her PhD Was in Philosophy of Education From the Ontario Institute for the Study of Education, University of Toronto. Her Research Interests Include Philosophical Inquiries in the Areas of Creativity and Critical Thinking. Her Major Publications. [REVIEW] Science and Education 11:419-421.score: 552.0
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  13. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 544.5
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in (...)
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  14. Peter T. Manicas (2006). A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 542.6
    This introduction to the philosophy of social science provides an original conception of the task and nature of social inquiry. Peter Manicas discusses the role of causality seen in the physical sciences and offers a reassessment of the problem of explanation from a realist perspective. He argues that the fundamental goal of theory in both the natural and social sciences is not, contrary to widespread opinion, prediction and control, or the explanation of events (including behaviour). Instead, (...)
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  15. Brian Fay (1996). Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science: A Multicultural Approach. Blackwell.score: 537.0
    This volume provides a lucid and distinct introduction to multiculturalism and the philosophy of social science.
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  16. W. G. Runciman (1972). A Critique of Max Weber's Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.score: 537.0
    This essay is written in the belief that it is possible to say both where Max Weber's philosophy of social science is mistaken and how these mistakes can be put right. Runciman argues that Weber's analysis breaks down at three decisive points: the difference between theoretical pre-suppositions and implicit value-judgements; the manner in which 'idiographic' explanations are to be subsumed under causal laws; and the relation of explanation to description in sociology. The arguments which Weber put forward are (...)
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  17. Roger Trigg (2001). Understanding Social Science: A Philosophical Introduction to the Social Sciences. Blackwell Publisers.score: 537.0
    In this lucid and engaging introductory volume on the nature of society, Roger Trigg examines the scientific basis of social science and shows that philosophical presuppositions are a necessary starting point for the study of society.
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  18. Peter Winch (2008/2007). The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy. Routledge.score: 537.0
    The problems dealt with in The Idea of a Social Science are philosophical. It is an attempt to place the social science, considered as a single group, on the intellectual map, with special attention to the relations of the discipline to philosophy on the one hand and the natural sciences on the other. The author holds that the relation between the social sciences and philosophy is commonly misunderstood because of certain fashionable misconceptions about the nature (...)
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  19. David Thomas (1979). Naturalism and Social Science: A Post-Empiricist Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 528.0
    This 1979 text addresses the ways in which the dominant theories in large areas of Western social science have been subject to strong criticisms, particularly ...
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  20. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2005). The Relevance of Rules to a Critical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):391-419.score: 519.4
    The aim of this article is to argue for a conception of critical social science based on the model of constitutive rules. The author argues that this model is pragmatically superior to those models that employ notions like "illusion" and " ideology," as it does not demand a specification of the "real (but hidden) interests" of social actors. Key Words: constitutive rules • critical theory • ideology • recommendations • social facts.
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  21. Fred D'Agostino (1995). Social Science as a Social Institution: Neutrality and the Politics of Social Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):396-405.score: 518.3
    Philosophy of Social Science, that social scientific investigations do not and cannot meet the liberal requirement of "neutrality" most familiar to social scientists in the form of Max Weber's requirement of value-freedom. He argues, moreover, that this is for "institutional," not idiosyncratic, reasons: methodological demands (e.g., of validity) impel social scientists to pass along into their "objective" investigations the values of the people, groups, and cultures they are studying. In this paper, I consider the implications (...)
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  22. James Bohman (1999). Theories, Practices, and Pluralism: A Pragmatic Interpretation of Critical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (4):459-480.score: 518.3
    A hallmark of recent critical social science has been the commitment to methodological and theoretical pluralism. Habermas and others have argued that diverse theoretical and empirical approaches are needed to support informed social criticism. However, an unresolved tension remains in the epistemology of critical social science: the tension between the epistemic advantages of a single comprehensive theoretical framework and those of methodological and theoretical pluralism. By shifting the grounds of the debate in a way suggested (...)
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  23. Ricardo Waizbort (2004). Objectivity in Social Science: Toward a Hermeneutical Evolutionary Theory. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (1):151-162.score: 518.3
    s book, Hermeneutic Dialogue and Social Science: A critique of Gadamer and Habermas, intends to present an account of debates on objectivity in the social sciences, in stressing the political and epistemological responsibility, in public spheres, to those who want to create a fairer understanding of societies and history, without demonizing natural enterprises or leaving social studies out of acute critical questioning. Key Words: dialogue • hermeneutic • social sciences • natural sciences • method.
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  24. Joseph M. Bryant (2004). An Evolutionary Social Science? A Skeptic’s Brief, Theoretical and Substantive. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (4):451-492.score: 518.3
    So-called grand or paradigmatic theories—structural functionalism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, rational-choice theory—provide their proponents with a conceptual vocabulary and syntax that allows for the classification and configuring of wide ranges of phenomena. Advocates for any particular “analytical grammar” are accordingly prone to conflating the internal coherence of their paradigm—its integrated complex of definitions, axioms, and inferences—with a corresponding capacity for representational verisimilitude. The distinction between Theory-as-heuristic and Theory-as-imposition is of course difficult to negotiate in practice, given that empirical observation and measurement are (...)
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  25. Andreas Pickel (2001). Between Social Science and Social Technology: Toward a Philosophical Foundation for Post-Communist Transformation Studies. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):459-487.score: 518.3
    This analysis examines fundamental questions at the intersection of social science and social technology as well as problems of disciplinary divisions and the challenge of cross-disciplinary cooperation. Its theoretical-empirical context is provided by post-communist transformations, a set of profound societal changes in which institutional design plays a central role. The article critically reappraises the contribution of Karl Popper's philosophy to this problem context, examines neoliberalism as social science and social technology, and examines the role (...)
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  26. Chares Demetriou (2009). The Realist Approach to Explanatory Mechanisms in Social Science: More Than a Heuristic? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):440-462.score: 516.0
    The mechanism-realist paradigm in the philosophy of science, championed by Mario Bunge and Roy Bhaskar, sets certain expectations for the substantive social-scientific application of the paradigm. To evaluate the application of the paradigm in accomplished substantive research, as well as the potential for future research, I examine the work of Charles Tilly, the exemplary substantive work in the mechanism-realist tradition. Based on this examination, I argue for the usefulness of explanatory mechanisms, provided that they are couched in terms (...)
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  27. David L. Hull (1988). A Mechanism and its Metaphysics: An Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of Science. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):123-155.score: 513.0
    The claim that conceptual systems change is a platitude. That our conceptual systems are theory-laden is no less platitudinous. Given evolutionary theory, biologists are led to divide up the living world into genes, organisms, species, etc. in a particular way. No theory-neutral individuation of individuals or partitioning of these individuals into natural kinds is possible. Parallel observations should hold for philosophical theories about scientific theories. In this paper I summarize a theory of scientific change which I set out in considerable (...)
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  28. Julio R. Tuma (2011). Nanoethics and the Breaching of Boundaries: A Heuristic for Going From Encouragement to a Fuller Integration of Ethical, Legal and Social Issues and Science. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):761-767.score: 513.0
    The intersection of ELSI and science forms a complicated nexus yet their integration is an important goal both for society and for the successful advancement of science. In what follows, I present a heuristic that makes boundary identification and crossing an important tool in the discovery of potential areas of ethical, legal, and social concern in science. A dynamic and iterative application of the heuristic can lead towards a fuller integration and appreciation of the concerns of (...)
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  29. Kei Yoshida (2012). Re-Politicising Philosophy of Science: A Continuing Challenge for Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):365-378.score: 508.5
    The aim of this paper is to investigate how we can reunite social philosophy and philosophy of science to address problems in science and technology. First, referring to Don Howard?s, George Reisch?s, and Philip Mirowski?s works, I shall briefly explain how philosophy of science was depoliticised during the cold war. Second, I shall examine Steve Fuller?s criticism of Thomas Kuhn. Third, I shall scrutinise Philip Kitcher?s view of well-ordered science. Fourth, I shall emphasise the importance (...)
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  30. A. R. Louch (1963). The Very Idea of a Social Science. Inquiry 6 (1-4):273 – 286.score: 508.5
    In The Idea of a Social Science Winch, argues that, sociology is more properly conceived as a branch of philosophy than of empirical science. Winch falls victim here to the Humean assimilation of the empirical to the generalizable. He notes that much of our talk about social practice is in terms of conventions, so that explanations of social action can be given without recourse to statistical or experimental findings. But such talk depends nonetheless on the (...)
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  31. Steve Fuller (2014). Recovering Biology's Potential as a Science of Social Progress Reply to Renwick. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):497-505.score: 507.0
    Chris Renwick’s recent research into the fate of William Beveridge’s attempt to establish social biology as the foundational social science at the London School of Economics is history at its best by uncovering a moment in the past when decisions were taken comparable to ones being taken today. In this case, the issues concern the political and scientific foundations of the welfare state. By connecting Beveridge’s original reasoning to recruit Lancelot Hogben for the Rockefeller-sponsored social biology (...)
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  32. Philip Wexler (2008). A Secular Alchemy of Social Science: The Denial of Jewish Messianism in Freud and Durkheim. Theoria 55 (116):1-21.score: 505.1
    This essay presents a reading of the work of two central figures of modern social theory that locates their work within not simply mainstream Jewish thought, but a particular Hasidic tradition. Further, I argue that lying behind this, in a repressed form, is an even older tradition of Jewish alchemy. I make no claim to have evidence that either Freud or Durkheim were directly influenced by Hasidism or alchemy, but I examine the parallels between the structure of their thoughts (...)
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  33. Leah A. Lievrouw (2011). Social Media and the Production of Knowledge: A Return to Little Science? Social Epistemology 24 (3):219-237.score: 504.0
    In the classic study Little science, big science (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963), Derek Price traces the historical shift from what he calls little science?exemplified by early?modern ?invisible colleges? of scientific amateurs and enthusiasts engaged in small?scale, informal interactions and personal correspondence?to 20th?century big science, dominated by professional scientists and wealthy institutions, where scientific information (primarily in print form and its analogues) was mass?produced, marketed and circulated on a global scale. This article considers whether the (...)
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  34. Philip Pettit (2000). Winch's Double-Edged Idea of a Social Science. History of the Human Sciences 13 (1):63-77.score: 502.5
    Peter Winch’s 1958 book The Idea of a Social Science contains two distinguishable sets of theses, one set bearing on the individual-level understanding of human beings, the other on the society-level understanding of the regularities and institutions to which human beings give rise. The first set of claims is persuasive and significant but the second is a mixed bunch: none is well established and only some are sound.
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  35. Jeroen van Bouwel & Erik Weber (2008). A Pragmatist Defense of Non-Relativistic Explanatory Pluralism in History and Social Science. History and Theory 47 (2):168–182.score: 499.5
    Explanatory pluralism has been defended by several philosophers of history and social science, recently, for example, by Tor Egil Førland in this journal. In this article, we provide a better argument for explanatory pluralism, based on the pragmatist idea of epistemic interests. Second, we show that there are three quite different senses in which one can be an explanatory pluralist: one can be a pluralist about questions, a pluralist about answers to questions, and a pluralist about both. We (...)
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  36. Frank Pearce, Jon Frauley & Ronjon Paul Datta (2010). Situation Critical: For a Critical, Reflexive, Realist, Emancipatory Social Science. Journal of Critical Realism 9 (2):227-247.score: 499.5
    This paper articulates the commitments, contours and justifications for a pluralist but non-eclectic critical, realist, reflexive social science with emancipatory aims. In it, we stress that social science can and should be used to guide the conceptualization of desirable and viable forms of social organization and their conditions of realization. In this regard, we advocate explanatory theorizing as an ethical duty of social scientists and as a moral good in itself as well as being (...)
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  37. Michael Martin (1981). Is Medicine a Social Science? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (4):345-360.score: 499.5
    The question, "Is medicine a social science?" can be understood in three different ways. One interpretation suggests that medicine is merely a social science, which is obviously false. Another interpretation is that medicine might be in part a social science. The third interpretation of the question is, "Is the social scientific dimension of medicine very important?" Three claims are considered about the social scientific dimension of medicine. Although these claims are shown to (...)
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  38. Barry Hoffmaster (1981). Family Medicine as a Social Science. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (4):387-410.score: 499.5
    The branch of clinical medicine most likely to qualify as a social science is family medicine. Whether family medicine is a social science is addressed in four steps. First, the nature of family medicine is outlined. Second, the extent to which social science knowledge is used in family practice is discussed. Third, the extent to which family medicine can qualify as a social science is considered with respect to an orthodox model of (...)
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  39. Allen Oakley (2000). Alfred Schutz and Economics as a Social Science. Human Studies 23 (3):243-260.score: 499.5
    Over the years, a number of interpreters with an interest in economics have given some attention the work of Alfred Schutz. As intimated in this literature, the orientation of his delimited thought on economics stemmed from contacts with the Austrian school during his Vienna years. Probably because of this connection, there exists among these interpreters an inclination uncritically to align Schutz with the Austrians' thought. What will be argued in this paper is that in adopting such an uncritical position, each (...)
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  40. Susan E. Bernick (1991). Toward a Value-Laden Theory: Feminism and Social Science. Hypatia 6 (2):118 - 136.score: 499.5
    Marjorie Shostak's ethnography, Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, is analyzed as a case study of feminist social science. Three principles of feminist research are suggested as standards for evaluation. After discussion of the principles and analysis of the text, I raise a criticism of the principles as currently sketched. The entire project is framed by the question of how best to resolve conflict between researcher and participant accounts.
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  41. Bruce J. Petrie (2010). William Sims Bainbridge. The Warcraft Civilization: Social Science in a Virtual World. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):270-272.score: 499.5
    New branches of social science primarily engaging the “internet revolution” are appearing alongside mainstream research and journals such as Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking are providing social scientists with an outlet of peer-reviewed research. HPS scholars will find new methodologies and the relation of technology to social science of particularly interest. Social scientists are becoming increasingly interested in virtual realities (see Milburn (Spontaneous Generations 2008, 63)) and are declaring time spent “in-game” ethnographic research. (...)
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  42. Juan Sandoval (2013). A situated approach of the qualitative research in social science. Cinta de Moebio 46 (46):37-46.score: 499.5
    In the present essay we propose explore a situated approach to knowledge, the action and the discourse; analyzing some of its theoretical and epistemological implications for the qualitative research in social science. First, based on notions of background and articulation, we propose one theoretical scheme about knowledge as "situated action". Secondly, we analyze the implications of this theoretical approach, in the conceptual perspective of discourse, and then in the methodological field, on the ways of implementing the qualitative (...) research practices. En el presente ensayo nos proponemos explorar una perspectiva situada del conocimiento, la acción y el discurso, analizando algunas de sus principales implicancias teóricas y epistemológicas para la investigación cualitativa en ciencias sociales. En primer lugar, pretendemos desarrollar un esquema teórico sobre el conocimiento como "acción situada" a partir de nociones como trasfondo y articulación. En segundo lugar, nos proponemos analizar las implicancias de esta perspectiva teórica, en el plano conceptual sobre la noción de discurso, y en el plano metodológico sobre las formas de implementar las prácticas cualitativas de investigación social. (shrink)
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  43. Paul H. Robinson & John M. Darley (1998). Objectivist Versus Subjectivist Views of Criminality: A Study in the Role of Social Science in Criminal Law Theory. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (3):409-447.score: 499.5
    The authors use social science methodology to determine whether a doctrinal shift—from an objectivist view of criminality in the common law to a subjectivist view in modem criminal codes—is consistent with lay intuitions of the principles of justice. Commentators have suggested that lay perceptions of criminality have shifted in a way reflected in the doctrinal change, but the study results suggest a more nuanced conclusion: that the modern lay view agrees with the subjectivist view of modern codes in (...)
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  44. Sean Jennings (2012). Response to Schrag: What Are Ethics Committees for Anyway? A Defence of Social Science Research Ethics Review. Research Ethics 8 (2):87-96.score: 499.5
    Zachary Schrag would like to put the burden of proof for continuation of research ethics review in the Social Sciences on those who advocate for research ethics committees (RECs), and asks that we take the concerns that he raises seriously. I separate his concerns into a principled issue and a number of pragmatic issues. The principled issue concerns the justification for having research ethics committees; the pragmatic issues concern questions such as the effectiveness of review and the expertise of (...)
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  45. Mark Risjord (2014). Philosophy of Social Science: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 499.5
    The Philosophy of Social Science: A Contemporary Introduction examines the perennial questions of philosophy by engaging with the empirical study of society. The book offers a comprehensive overview of debates in the field, with special attention to questions arising from new research programs in the social sciences. The text uses detailed examples of social scientific research to motivate and illustrate the philosophical discussion. Topics include the relationship of social policy to social science, interpretive (...)
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  46. Ines Langemeyer & Wolf-Michael Roth (2006). Is Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Threatened to Fall Short of its Own Principles and Possibilities as a Dialectical Social Science? Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (2):20-42.score: 497.3
    In recent years, many researchers engaged in diverse areas and approaches of “cultural-historical activity theory” (CHAT) realized an increasing international interest in Lev S. Vygotsky’s, A. N. Leont’ev’s, and A. Luria’s work and its continuations. Not so long ago, Yrjö Engeström noted that the activity approach was still “the best-held secret of academia” (p. 64) and highlighted the “impressive dimension of theorizing behind” it. Certainly, this remark reflects a time when CHAT was off the beaten tracks. But if this situation (...)
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  47. Andrew Stewart Skinner (1996). A System of Social Science: Papers Relating to Adam Smith. Clarendon Press.score: 497.3
    The second edition of this guide to Adam Smith's system of thought has been fully updated to reflect recent developments in Smith scholarship and Professor Skinner's experience of teaching Smith to a student audience. The material from the first edition has been extensively rewritten, and four new chapters have been added, covering Smith's essays on the exercise of human understanding, and his relationship to Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, and Sir James Steuart. -/- Professor Skinner places Smith's system of social, (...)
     
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  48. Kostas Kampourakis (2013). Mendel and the Path to Genetics: Portraying Science as a Social Process. [REVIEW] Science and Education 22 (2):293-324.score: 495.0
    Textbook descriptions of the foundations of Genetics give the impression that besides Mendel’s no other research on heredity took place during the nineteenth century. However, the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, and the criticism that it received, placed the study of heredity at the centre of biological thought. Consequently, Herbert Spencer, Charles Darwin himself, Francis Galton, William Keith Brooks, Carl von Nägeli, August Weismann, and Hugo de Vries attempted to develop theories of heredity under an evolutionary perspective, (...)
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  49. Sujatha Raman & Alison Mohr (2014). A Social Licence for Science: Capturing the Public or Co-Constructing Research? 28 (3-4):258-276.score: 495.0
    The “social licence to operate” has been invoked in science policy discussions including the 2007 Universal Ethical Code for scientists issued by the UK Government Office for Science. Drawing from sociological research on social licence and STS interventions in science policy, the authors explore the relevance of expectations of a social licence for scientific research and scientific contributions to public decision-making, and what might be involved in seeking to create one. The process of seeking (...)
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  50. Jimmy Lee Shaw (1985). Ethics, Science and Value Judgments: A Critique of Ethical Issues Within the Methodology of Social Research. Journal of Social Studies Research 9 (1):41-52.score: 490.5
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