Search results for 'Elizabeth Ewing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  34
    Elizabeth Ewing (1995). Authenticity in Heidegger: A Response to Dreyfus. Inquiry 38 (4):469 – 487.
    In his book, Being?in?the?World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I, Hubert Dreyfus argues that Heidegger's concept of authenticity is incomprehensible. He maintains that there are two conflicting accounts of inauthenticity in Being and Time. He elucidates what he calls the ?structural account? of inauthenticity and being?in?the?world in the main body of his work, and then criticizes what he calls the ?motivational account? in an Appendix. Because he overlooks certain textual evidence and underemphasizes fleeing and the role of (...)
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  2.  40
    T. R. Miles, Elizabeth Telfer, W. Charlton, P. M. S. Hacker, Gwynneth Matthews & A. C. Ewing (1970). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 79 (313):145-159.
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  3. A. C. Ewing (2012). A.C. Ewing Collected Works (Routledge Revivals). Routledge.
    This six volume backlist collection brings together an assortment of seminal works by highly influential British philosopher A. C. Ewing. This comprehensive and diverse collection encompasses a fantastic selection of his work in the field of moral philosophy and the history of philosophy; ranging from the definition of good, through to his views on punishment and a study on the work of Emmanuel Kant. Spanning more than 30 years in Professor Ewing’s distinguished career, the reissued volumes in this (...)
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  4.  36
    A. C. Ewing (1935). On Dr. Ewing's Neglect of Bradley's Theory of Internal Relations: Reply. Journal of Philosophy 32 (10):273.
  5.  1
    A. C. Ewing (1973). Common Sense Propositions: A. C. Ewing. Philosophy 48 (186):363-379.
    Philosophers have not been sceptical only about metaphysics or religious beliefs. There are a great number of other beliefs generally held which they have had at least as much difficulty in justifying, and in the present article I ask questions as to the right philosophical attitude to these beliefs in cases where to our everyday thought they seem so obvious as to be a matter of the most ordinary common sense. A vast number of propositions go beyond what is merely (...)
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  6. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). The Definition of Good. Routledge.
    First published in Great Britain in 1948, this book examines the definition of goodness as being distinct from the question of _What things are good?_ Although less immediately and obviously practical, Dr. Ewing argues that the former question is more fundamental since it raises the issue of whether ethics is explicable wholly in terms of something else, for example, human psychology. Ewing states in his preface that the definition of goodness needs to be confirmed before one decides on (...)
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  7.  13
    A. C. Ewing (1979). The Definition of Good. Hyperion Press.
    First published in Great Britain in 1948, this book examines the definition of goodness as being distinct from the question of What things are good? Although less immediately and obviously practical, Dr. Ewing argues that the former question is more fundamental since it raises the issue of whether ethics is explicable wholly in terms of something else, for example, human psychology. Ewing states in his preface that the definition of goodness needs to be confirmed before one decides on (...)
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  8. Alfred C. Ewing (2013). Kant's Treatment of Causality. Routledge.
    First published in 1924, this book examines one of the main philosophical debates of the period. Focusing on Kant’s proof of causality, A.C. Ewing promotes its validity not only for the physical but also for the "psychological" sphere. The subject is of importance, for the problem of causality for Kant constituted the crucial test of his philosophy, the most significant of the Kantian categories. The author believes that Kant’s statement of his proof, while too much bound up with other (...)
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  9. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). Second Thoughts in Moral Philosophy. Routledge.
    First published in 1959, this volume follows on from Dr. A. C. Ewing’s earlier work, _The Definition of Good_. The book does not apologize or undermine Ewing’s previous publication but after further consideration on the topic, it explores the issues that were arguably overlooked in the original book. For example, it looks at the possibility of intermediate positions which have been developed since the philosophers Moore and Ross did their main work. Ewing also responds to the criticisms (...)
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  10. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). The Definition of Good. Routledge.
    First published in Great Britain in 1948, this book examines the definition of goodness as being distinct from the question of _What things are good?_ Although less immediately and obviously practical, Dr. Ewing argues that the former question is more fundamental since it raises the issue of whether ethics is explicable wholly in terms of something else, for example, human psychology. Ewing states in his preface that the definition of goodness needs to be confirmed before one decides on (...)
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  11.  8
    Alfred C. Ewing (2012). The Morality of Punishment : With Some Suggestions for a General Theory of Ethics. Routledge.
    First published in 1929, this book explores the crucial, ethical question of the objects and the justification of punishment. Dr. A. C. Ewing considers both the retributive theory and the deterrent theory on the subject whilst remaining commendably unprejudiced. The book examines the views which emphasize the reformation of the offender and the education of the community as objects of punishment. It also deals with a theory of reward as a compliment to a theory of punishment. Dr. Ewing’s (...)
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  12.  4
    A. C. Ewing (1959). Second Thoughts in Moral Philosophy. New York, Macmillan.
    Alfred C Ewing. Routledge Revivals First published in 1959, this volume follows on from Dr. A. C. Ewing's earlier work, The Definition of Good. The book does not apologize or undermine Ewing's previous publication but after further ...
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  13.  4
    W. D. Hudson & A. C. Ewing (1976). Value and Reality: The Philosophical Case for Theism. Philosophical Quarterly 26 (103):196.
    This is a major work by one of the best-known philosophical writers, representing the culmination of some twenty-five years’ work on the possibility of giving a rational defence of the claims of the religious man, and specifically the theist, in the face of modern criticisms. Dr Ewing’s object has been to fulfil what seem to him the two most important tasks for the philosopher in at least the present age, namely, to see if it is still possible to give (...)
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  14. Keith Ewing & Conor Anthony Gearty (2000). The Struggle for Civil Liberties: Political Freedom and the Rule of Law in Britain, 1914-1945. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'This is a powerful piece of advocacy. I'd pick Ewing and Gearty for my counsels any day.' -Bernard Porter, LRBThis book is an account of the struggle for civil liberties against the State in which groups such as the anti-war protestors, the Irish nationalists, the Communist party, trade unionists, and the unemployed workers' movement found themselves involved in the first half of the twentieth century. All had to fight for their civil liberties in the face of strong opposition from (...)
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  15.  5
    Selena R. Ewing (2011). I Don't Want to Be a Burden. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (3):40.
    Ewing, Selena R Sometimes we find a question in bioethics that seems so mundane and common that nobody cares to consider it, and yet it has no easy answer. The question of my current research project is this. When an elderly person, perhaps your parent or your patient, says 'I don't want to be a burden,' what do they mean and how should we respond?
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  16.  3
    Selena R. Ewing (2012). Volume 23 Issue 3 - 'I Don't Want to Be a Burden'. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (3):40-.
    Ewing, Selena R Sometimes we find a question in bioethics that seems so mundane and common that nobody cares to consider it, and yet it has no easy answer. The question of my current research project is this. When an elderly person, perhaps your parent or your patient, says 'I don't want to be a burden,' what do they mean and how should we respond?
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  17.  3
    Selena Ewing (2012). Bearing the Burden of Aging Parents: The Christian Response. Bioethics Research Notes 24 (3):49.
    Ewing, Selena This paper is part of a larger body of research which was partly supported by a grant from the Mary Phillippa Brazill Foundation.
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  18.  3
    Harley Ewing & Ewing (2010). On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society [Book Review]. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (1):12.
    Ewing, Harley; Ewing, Selena Review of: On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society, by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, Back Bay Books, 1995.
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  19. A. C. Ewing (1924). Kant's Treatment of Causality. [Hamden, Conn.]Archon Books.
    First published in 1924, this book examines one of the main philosophical debates of the period. Focusing on Kant’s proof of causality, A.C. Ewing promotes its validity not only for the physical but also for the "psychological" sphere. The subject is of importance, for the problem of causality for Kant constituted the crucial test of his philosophy, the most significant of the Kantian categories. The author believes that Kant’s statement of his proof, while too much bound up with other (...)
     
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  20. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). Kant's Treatment of Causality. Routledge.
    First published in 1924, this book examines one of the main philosophical debates of the period. Focusing on Kant’s proof of causality, A.C. Ewing promotes its validity not only for the physical but also for the "psychological" sphere. The subject is of importance, for the problem of causality for Kant constituted the crucial test of his philosophy, the most significant of the Kantian categories. The author believes that Kant’s statement of his proof, while too much bound up with other (...)
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  21. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). Second Thoughts in Moral Philosophy. Routledge.
    First published in 1959, this volume follows on from Dr. A. C. Ewing’s earlier work, _The Definition of Good_. The book does not apologize or undermine Ewing’s previous publication but after further consideration on the topic, it explores the issues that were arguably overlooked in the original book. For example, it looks at the possibility of intermediate positions which have been developed since the philosophers Moore and Ross did their main work. Ewing also responds to the criticisms (...)
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  22. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). Second Thoughts in Moral Philosophy. Routledge.
    First published in 1959, this volume follows on from Dr. A. C. Ewing’s earlier work, _The Definition of Good_. The book does not apologize or undermine Ewing’s previous publication but after further consideration on the topic, it explores the issues that were arguably overlooked in the original book. For example, it looks at the possibility of intermediate positions which have been developed since the philosophers Moore and Ross did their main work. Ewing also responds to the criticisms (...)
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  23. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). The Definition of Good. Routledge.
    First published in Great Britain in 1948, this book examines the definition of goodness as being distinct from the question of _What things are good?_ Although less immediately and obviously practical, Dr. Ewing argues that the former question is more fundamental since it raises the issue of whether ethics is explicable wholly in terms of something else, for example, human psychology. Ewing states in his preface that the definition of goodness needs to be confirmed before one decides on (...)
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  24. Alfred C. Ewing (2012). The Morality of Punishment : With Some Suggestions for a General Theory of Ethics. Routledge.
    First published in 1929, this book explores the crucial, ethical question of the objects and the justification of punishment. Dr. A. C. Ewing considers both the retributive theory and the deterrent theory on the subject whilst remaining commendably unprejudiced. The book examines the views which emphasize the reformation of the offender and the education of the community as objects of punishment. It also deals with a theory of reward as a compliment to a theory of punishment. Dr. Ewing’s (...)
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  25. Alfred Cyril Ewing (2013). Value and Reality: The Philosophical Case for Theism. Routledge.
    This is a major work by one of the best-known philosophical writers, representing the culmination of some twenty-five years’ work on the possibility of giving a rational defence of the claims of the religious man, and specifically the theist, in the face of modern criticisms. Dr Ewing’s object has been to fulfil what seem to him the two most important tasks for the philosopher in at least the present age, namely, to see if it is still possible to give (...)
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  26. H. Barker, F. C. S. Schiller, Stanley V. Keeling, A. C. Ewing, E. J. Thomas, Helen Knight & O. de Selincourt (1928). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 37 (146):239-251.
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  27. C. D. Broad, F. P. Ramsey, D. M. Wrinch, A. C. Ewing, H. R. Mackintosh, A. G. Widgery & S. S. (1925). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 34 (136):504-516.
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  28. C. D. Broad, Richard Robinson, H. B. Acton, George E. Hughes, T. D. Weldon, Mario M. Rossi, A. C. Ewing, C. J. Holloway, J. P. Corbett, C. W. K. Mundle, W. B. Gallie, W. Mays, A. H. Armstrong, C. K. Grant & I. M. Cromble (1949). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 58 (229):101-130.
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  29. Alfred C. Ewing (1948). Mental Acts. Mind 57 (April):201-220.
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  30.  72
    Alfred C. Ewing (1930). Direct Knowledge and Perception. Mind 39 (154):137-153.
  31.  67
    A. J. Ayer, A. E. Taylor, W. J. H. Sprott, J. O. Wisdom, D. J., John Laird, R. J., A. C. Ewing & F. C. S. Schiller (1937). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 46 (182):244-264.
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  32.  42
    Gavrell Ortiz & Sara Elizabeth (2004). Beyond Welfare: Animal Integrity, Animal Dignity, and Genetic Engineering. Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):94-120.
    : Bernard Rollin argues that it is permissible to change an animal's telos through genetic engineering, if it doesn't harm the animal's welfare. Recent attempts to undermine his argument rely either on the claim that diminishing certain capacities always harms an animal's welfare or on the claim that it always violates an animal's integrity. I argue that these fail. However, respect for animal dignity provides a defeasible reason not to engineer an animal in a way that inhibits the development of (...)
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  33.  37
    A. M. Bodkin, A. C. Ewing, F. C. S. Schiller, A. E. Taylor, S. S., C. A. Mace & John Laird (1926). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 35 (138):246-257.
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  34.  11
    H. Barker, S. S., P. Leon, J. S. Mackenzie, F. C. S. Schiller, A. C. Ewing, Rex Knight & E. S. Waterhouse (1931). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 40 (158):242-259.
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  35.  11
    E. W. Edwards, W. J. H. Sprott, F. C. S. Schiller, A. C. Ewing, John H. Munkman, John Laird, M. B. Foster, A. S., R. E. Stedman & F. C. (1935). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 44 (174):240-260.
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  36.  22
    Alfred C. Ewing (1953). Professor Ryle's Attack on Dualism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 53:47-78.
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  37.  7
    R. B. Braithwaite, H. F. Hallett, J. S. Mackenzie, W. J., A. G. Widgery, R. A. & A. C. Ewing (1924). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 33 (132):460-473.
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  38.  6
    H. B. Acton, C. A. Campbell, D. Macnabb, A. D. Woozley, D. J. Allan, P. H. Nowell-Smith & A. C. Ewing (1952). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 61 (241):119-136.
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  39.  5
    B. O. A. Elizabeth (1981). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (1).
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  40.  12
    Alfred C. Ewing (1951). Indeterminism. Review of Metaphysics 5 (December):199-222.
  41.  7
    Karl Britton, Philip Leon, D. J. Allan, J. O. Wisdom, Olaf Helmer, F. C. S. Schiller, A. C. Ewing, A. Gwynn, W. G. de Burgh & John Laird (1937). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 46 (181):87-110.
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  42.  3
    B. O. A. Elizabeth (1976). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (1).
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  43.  3
    B. O. A. Elizabeth (1989). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (1).
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  44.  9
    R. I. Aaron, L. J. Russell, S. V. Keeling, H. J. Paton, W. D. Lamont, T. E. Jessop, V. W. & A. C. Ewing (1930). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 39 (155):376-394.
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  45.  6
    Alfred C. Ewing (1945). Are Mental Attributes Attributes of the Body? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 45:27-58.
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  46.  18
    Carroll E. Izard, Elizabeth M. Woodburn, Kristy J. Finlon, E. Stephanie Krauthamer-Ewing, Stacy R. Grossman & Adina Seidenfeld (2011). Emotion Knowledge, Emotion Utilization, and Emotion Regulation. Emotion Review 3 (1):44-52.
    This article suggests a way to circumvent some of the problems that follow from the lack of consensus on a definition of emotion (Izard, 2010; Kleinginna & Kleinginna, 1981) and emotion regulation (Cole, Martin, & Dennis, 2004) by adopting a conceptual framework based on discrete emotions theory and focusing on specific emotions. Discrete emotions theories assume that neural, affective, and cognitive processes differ across specific emotions and that each emotion has particular motivational and regulatory functions. Thus, efforts at regulation should (...)
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  47.  16
    Karen E. Tatum (2010). Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads (...)
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  48.  6
    José Igor Prieto-Arranz (2015). Whiggish History for Contemporary Audiences. Implicit Religion in Shekhar Kapur's Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (41):52-78.
    As James Chapman has famously put it in National Identity and the British Historical Film, historical films are “as much about the present in which they are made as they are about [the] past in which they are set.” This article discusses Shekhar Kapur’s aesthetically ground-breaking Elizabeth and its sequel Elizabeth: The Golden Age focusing on two main aspects, namely national identity issues and the representation of the enemy. Kapur’s Elizabeth films will first be placed within the (...)
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  49.  30
    Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.
  50.  20
    W. B. Gallie (1948). Dr Ewing on Mental Acts. Mind 57 (October):480-487.
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