Search results for 'Elizabeth Levy Paluck' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth Levy Paluck (2012). The Dominance of the Individual in Intergroup Relations Research: Understanding Social Change Requires Psychological Theories of Collective and Structural Phenomena. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):33-34.score: 870.0
    Dixon et al. suggest that the psychological literature on intergroup relations should shift from theorizing to A focus on social change exposes the importance of psychological theories involving collective phenomena like social norms and institutions. Individuals' attitudes and emotions may follow, rather than cause, changes in social norms and institutional arrangements.
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  2. Elizabeth R. Schotter, Klinton Bicknell, Ian Howard, Roger Levy & Keith Rayner (2014). Task Effects Reveal Cognitive Flexibility Responding to Frequency and Predictability: Evidence From Eye Movements in Reading and Proofreading. Cognition 131 (1):1-27.score: 240.0
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  3. Ellen Winner, Jonathan Levy, Joan Kaplan & Elizabeth Rosenblatt (1988). Children's Understanding of Nonliteral Language. Journal of Aesthetic Education 22 (1):51-63.score: 240.0
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  4. Neil Levy & Yasuko Kitano (2011). We're All Folk: An Interview with Neil Levy About Experimental Philosophy and Conceptual Analysis. Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 19:87-98.score: 210.0
    The following is a transcript of the interview I (Yasuko Kitano) conducted with Neil Levy (The Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, CAPPE) on the 23rd in July 2009, while he was in Tokyo to give a series of lectures on neuroethics at The University of Tokyo Center for Philosophy. I edited his words for publication with his approval.
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  5. Nerys Levy (2005). My Husband, Bob Levy. Ethos 33 (4):433-434.score: 180.0
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  6. Sharon Levy (2011). Response From Levy. BioScience 61 (4):253-253.score: 180.0
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  7. Robert I. Levy (2005). Ethnography, Comparison, and Changing Times. Ethos 33 (4):435-458.score: 90.0
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  8. Cynthia Farrar, James S. Fishkin, Donald P. Green, Christian List, Robert C. Luskin & Elizabeth Levy Paluck, Disaggregating Deliberation's Effects: An Experiment Within a Deliberative Poll.score: 87.0
    Using data from a randomized field experiment within a Deliberative Poll, we examine deliberation’s effects on both policy attitudes and the extent to which ordinal rankings of policy options approach single-peakedness (a help in avoiding cyclical majorities). The issues were airport expansion and revenue-sharing in New Haven, Connecticut and its surrounding towns. Half the participants deliberated revenue-sharing, then the airport, the other half the reverse. This split-half design enables us to distinguish the effects of the formal on-site deliberations from those (...)
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  9. Zeev Levy (1974). On the Concept of Reason According to Sartre and Levi-Strauss. Philosophia 4 (4):567-568.score: 80.0
  10. Neil Levy (2011). Hard Luck: How Luck Undermines Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The concept of luck has played an important role in debates concerning free will and moral responsibility, yet participants in these debates have relied upon an intuitive notion of what luck is. Neil Levy develops an account of luck, which is then applied to the free will debate. He argues that the standard luck objection succeeds against common accounts of libertarian free will, but that it is possible to amend libertarian accounts so that they are no more vulnerable to (...)
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  11. Donald Levy (1996). Freud Among the Philosophers: The Psychoanalytic Unconscious and its Philosophical Critics. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    In this highly original book, Donald Levy considers the most important and persuasive of these philosophical criticisms, as articulated by four figures: Ludwig Wittgenstein, William James, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Adolf Grunbaum.
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  12. Neil Levy (2007). The Social: A Missing Term in the Debate Over Addiction and Voluntary Control. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):35 – 36.score: 60.0
    The author comments on the article “The Neurobiology of Addiction: Implications for Voluntary Control of Behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman’s article suggests that addicted individuals have impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author agrees with Hyman’s view that addiction weakens the addict’s ability to align his actions with his judgments. The author states that neuroethics may focus on brains and highlight key aspects of behavior but we still risk missing explanatory elements. Accession Number: 24077912; Authors: Levy, Neil (...)
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  13. John Levy (2004/1970). The Nature of Man According to the Vedanta. Sentient Publications.score: 60.0
    You will find this book to be one of the finest expositions of non-dualist philosophy, John Levy--an English mystic, teacher, and artist--uses Advaita's...
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  14. Jacob T. Levy (2008). Self-Determination, Non-Domination, and Federalism. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 60-78.score: 60.0
    This article summarizes the theory of federalism as non-domination Iris Marion Young began to develop in her final years, a theory of self-government that tried to recognize interconnectedness. Levy also poses an objection to that theory: non-domination cannot do the work Young needed of it, because it is a theory about the merits of decisions not about jurisdiction over them. The article concludes with an attempt to give Young the last word.
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  15. Neil Levy (2014). Consciousness and Moral Responsibility. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Neil Levy presents a new theory of freedom and responsibility. He defends a particular account of consciousness--the global workspace view--and argues that consciousness plays an especially important role in action. There are good reasons to think that the naïve assumption, that consciousness is needed for moral responsibility, is in fact true.
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  16. Catherine Levy (1997). La journée du 8 mars 1965 à Alger. Clio 1:11-11.score: 60.0
    Ce témoignage écrit est le récit d'un 8 mars, très particulier, dans un pays aujourd'hui déchiré par la guerre civile, l'Algérie. Catherine Lévy a enseigné de 1962 à 1965 en tant que « pied-rouge » : on désignait ainsi les Français et les Françaises qui sont partis en Algérie après l'indépendance pour aider à la construction de l'Algérie nouvelle. Professeur au Collège Ben Cheneb à Alger, elle était militante à l'UGTA de Bab-El-Oued et a participé à la manifestation qu'elle décrit (...)
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  17. Ze'ev Levy (1998). Claude Lévi-Strauss' Structural Anthropology and Mythology as Ultimate Meaning. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 21 (2):135-143.score: 60.0
     
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  18. Albert Levy (1998). Luis Prieto, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and the Lessons of Phonology. Semiotica 122 (3-4):233-240.score: 60.0
  19. George Sher (2008). Who's in Charge Here?: Reply to Neil Levy. Philosophia 36 (2):223-226.score: 24.0
    In his response to my essay “Out of Control,” Neil Levy contests my claims that (1) we are often responsible for acts that we do not consciously choose to perform, and that (2) despite the absence of conscious choice, there remains a relevant sense in which these actions are within our control. In this reply to Levy, I concede that claim (2) is linguistically awkward but defend the thought that it expresses, and I clarify my defense of claim (...)
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  20. Peter Baumann (2008). Single-Case Probabilities and the Case of Monty Hall: Levy's View. Synthese 162 (2):265 - 273.score: 24.0
    In Baumann (American Philosophical Quarterly 42: 71–79, 2005) I argued that reflections on a variation of the Monty Hall problem throws a very general skeptical light on the idea of single-case probabilities. Levy (Synthese, forthcoming, 2007) puts forward some interesting objections which I answer here.
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  21. Jack Weinstein (2006). Sympathy, Difference, and Education: Social Unity in the Work of Adam Smith. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):79-111.score: 24.0
    In this article, I examine Adam Smith's theory of the ways individuals in society bridge social and biological difference. In doing so, I emphasize the divisive effects of gender, race, and class to see if Smith's account of social unity can overcome such fractious forces. My discussion uses the metaphor of “proximity” to mean both physical and psychological distance between moral actors and spectators. I suggest that education – both formal and informal in means – can assist moral judgment by (...)
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  22. Tom Lindstrøm (2008). Nonlinear Stochastic Integrals for Hyperfinite Lévy Processes. Logic and Analysis 1 (2):91-129.score: 24.0
    I develop a notion of nonlinear stochastic integrals for hyperfinite Lévy processes and use it to find exact formulas for expressions which are intuitively of the form $\sum_{s=0}^t\phi(\omega,dl_{s},s)$ and $\prod_{s=0}^t\psi(\omega,dl_{s},s)$ , where l is a Lévy process. These formulas are then applied to geometric Lévy processes, infinitesimal transformations of hyperfinite Lévy processes, and to minimal martingale measures. Some of the central concepts and results are closely related to those found in S. Cohen’s work on stochastic calculus for processes with jumps (...)
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  23. Frédéric Keck (2004). Le primitif et le mystique chez Lévy-Bruhl, Bergson et Bataille. Methodos 3.score: 24.0
    L’assimilation du fou, du primitif et de l’enfant a été souvent analysée comme une opposition de l’archaïque par rapport au civilisé ou du normal par rapport au pathologique. On veut montrer ici que le mystique s’ajoute à cette liste, celle-ci désignant alors plutôt des figures de l’altérité qui défient la raison. On étudie alors les liens entre la figure du primitif et celle du mystique dans la sociologie de Lévy-Bruhl, la métaphysique de Bergson et la pratique littéraire de Bataille. Par-delà (...)
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  24. Elizabeth A. Levy Susan Mineka (1998). Anxiety and Mood-Congruent Autobiographical Memory: A Conceptual Failure to Replicate. Cognition and Emotion 12 (5):625-634.score: 24.0
  25. Karen E. Tatum (2010). Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.score: 24.0
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads (...)
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  26. Sam Baron (2013). Optimisation and Mathematical Explanation: Doing the Lévy Walk. Synthese (3):1-21.score: 21.0
    The indispensability argument seeks to establish the existence of mathematical objects. The success of the indispensability argument turns on finding cases of genuine extra-mathematical explanation (the explanation of physical facts by mathematical facts). In this paper, I identify a new case of extra-mathematical explanation, involving the search patterns of fully-aquatic marine predators. I go on to use this case to predict the prevalence of extra-mathematical explanation in science.
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  27. Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.score: 21.0
  28. D. N. Byrne (2013). After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson. [REVIEW] Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board.score: 21.0
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  29. Martin Dowd (1993). Remarks on Levy's Reflection Axiom. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 39 (1):79-95.score: 21.0
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  30. Douglas Hollan (2005). Setting a New Standard: The Person‐Centered Interviewing and Observation of Robert I. Levy. Ethos 33 (4):459-466.score: 21.0
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  31. Siu‐Ah Ng (2010). Lévy Processes on a First Order Model. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 56 (3):310-322.score: 21.0
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  32. Gregory M. Simon (2005). Shame, Knowing, and Anthropology: On Robert I. Levy and the Study of Emotion. Ethos 33 (4):493-498.score: 21.0
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  33. C. Jason Throop (2005). Hypocognition, a “Sense of the Uncanny,” and the Anthropology of Ambiguity: Reflections on Robert I. Levy's Contribution to Theories of Experience in Anthropology. Ethos 33 (4):499-511.score: 21.0
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  34. Neil Levy (2007). Rethinking Neuroethics in the Light of the Extended Mind Thesis. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):3-11.score: 20.0
    The extended mind thesis is the claim that mental states extend beyond the skulls of the agents whose states they are. This seemingly obscure and bizarre claim has far-reaching implications for neuroethics, I argue. In the first half of this article, I sketch the extended mind thesis and defend it against criticisms. In the second half, I turn to its neuroethical implications. I argue that the extended mind thesis entails the falsity of the claim that interventions into the brain are (...)
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  35. Neil Levy, Why Frankfurt-Style Cases Don't Help (Much).score: 20.0
    Frankfurt-style cases are widely taken to show that agents do not need alternative possibilities to be morally responsible for their actions. Many philosophers take these cases to constitute a powerful argument for compatibilism: if we do not need alternative possibilities for moral responsibility, it is hard to see what the attraction of indeterminism might be. I defend the claim that even though Frankfurt-style cases establish that agents can be responsible for their actions despite lacking alternatives, agents can only be responsible (...)
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  36. Timothy J. Bayne & Neil Levy (2006). The Feeling of Doing: Deconstructing the Phenomenology of Agnecy. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press.score: 20.0
    Disorders of volition are often accompanied by, and may even be caused by, disruptions in the phenomenology of agency. Yet the phenomenology of agency is at present little explored. In this paper we attempt to describe the experience of normal agency, in order to uncover its representational content.
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  37. Neil Levy (2004). Self-Deception and Moral Responsibility. Ratio 17 (3):294-311.score: 20.0
    The self-deceived are usually held to be moral responsible for their state. I argue that this attribution of responsibility makes sense only against the background of the traditional conception of self-deception, a conception that is now widely rejected. In its place, a new conception of self-deception has been articulated, which requires neither intentional action by self-deceived agents, nor that they possess contradictory beliefs. This new conception has neither need nor place for attributions of moral responsibility to the self-deceived in paradigmatic (...)
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  38. Neil Levy, Closing the Door on the Belief in Ability Thesis.score: 20.0
    It is, as Dana Nelkin (2004) says, a rare point of agreement among participants in the free will debate that rational deliberation presupposes a belief in freedom. Of course, the precise content of that belief – and, indeed, the nature of deliberation – is controversial, with some philosophers claiming that deliberation commits us to a belief in libertarian free will (Taylor 1966; Ginet 1966), and others claiming that, on the contrary, deliberation presupposes nothing more than an epistemic openness that is (...)
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  39. Neil Levy (2008). Self-Deception Without Thought Experiments. In T. Bayne & J. Fernández (eds.), Delusion and Self-Deception: Affective and Motivational Influences on Belief Formation. Psychology Press.score: 20.0
    Theories of self-deception divide into those that hold that the state is characterized by some kind of synchronic tension or conflict between propositional attitudes and those that deny this. Proponents of the latter like Al Mele claim that their theories are more parsimonious, because they do not require us to postulate any psychological mechanisms beyond those which have been independently verified. But if we can show that there are real cases of motivated believing which are characterized by conflicting propositional attitudes, (...)
     
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  40. Donald Levy (2003). Neural Holism and Free Will. Philosophical Psychology 16 (2):205-229.score: 20.0
    Both libertarian and compatibilist approaches have been unsuccessful in providing an acceptable account of free will. Recent developments in cognitive neuroscience, including the connectionist theory of mind and empirical findings regarding modularity and integration of brain functions, provide the basis for a new approach: neural holism. This approach locates free will in fully integrated behavior in which all of a person's beliefs and desires, implicitly represented in the brain, automatically contribute to an act. Deliberation, the experience of volition, and cognitive (...)
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  41. Neil Levy (2005). Contrastive Explanations: A Dilemma for Libertarians. Dialectica 59 (1):51-61.score: 20.0
    To the extent that indeterminacy intervenes between our reasons for action and our decisions, intentions and actions, our freedom seems to be reduced, not enhanced. Free will becomes nothing more than the power to choose irrationally. In recognition of this problem, some recent libertarians have suggested that free will is paradigmatically manifested only in actions for which we have reasons for both or all the alternatives. In these circumstances, however we choose, we choose rationally. Against this kind of account, most (...)
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  42. Neil Levy (2006). Determinist Deliberations. Dialectica 60 (4):453-459.score: 20.0
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  43. Ken Levy (2001). The Main Problem with USC Libertarianism. Philosophical Studies 105 (2):107-127.score: 20.0
    Libertarians like Robert Kane believe that indeterminism is necessaryfor free will. They think this in part because they hold both (1) thatmy being the ultimate cause of at least part of myself is necessary forfree will and (2) that indeterminism is necessary for this ``ultimateself-causation''. But seductive and intuitive as this ``USCLibertarianism'' may sound, it is untenable. In the end, nometaphysically coherent (not to mention empirically valid) conception ofultimate self-causation is available. So the basic intuition motivatingthe USC Libertarian is ultimately (...)
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  44. Neil Levy (2007). Agents and Mechanisms: Fischer's Way. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):123–130.score: 20.0
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  45. Anne Buchanan & Ellen Buchanan Weiss (2011). Of Sad and Wished-For Years: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Lifelong Illness. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):479-503.score: 18.0
    Victorian poets Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861) and Robert Browning (1812-1889) first fell in love through letters, which they began to write to each other in 1845 (Figures 1 and 2). Their growing relationship, slowly progressing from letter to first encounter and eventual secret marriage in 1846, is documented in two volumes of letters, with a plot that unfolds as warmly and compellingly as the best page-turner invented by a novelist. Both were master wordsmiths, so the beauty of their letters is (...)
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  46. G. E. M. Anscombe & Roger Teichmann (eds.) (2000). Logic, Cause & Action: Essays in Honour of Elizabeth Anscombe. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Elizabeth Anscombe is among the most distinguished and original philosophers alive today. Her work has ranged over many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of mind and action, and the philosophy of religion. In each of these areas she has made seminal contributions. The essays in this book reflect the breadth of her interests and the esteem in which she is held by her colleagues. The distinguished contributors include Michael Dunnett, Nancy Cartwright, Peter Geach and Philippa Foot; (...)
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  47. Mari Mikkola (2006). Elizabeth Spelman, Gender Realism, and Women. Hypatia 21 (4):77-96.score: 18.0
    : Elizabeth Spelman has famously argued against gender realism (the view that women have some feature in common that makes them women). By and large, feminist philosophers have embraced Spelman's arguments and deemed gender realist positions counterproductive. To the contrary, Mikkola shows that Spelman's arguments do not in actual fact give good reason to reject gender realism in general. She then suggests a way to understand gender realism that does not have the adverse consequences feminist philosophers commonly think gender (...)
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  48. Roger Teichmann (2008). The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    One of the most important philosophers of recent times, Elizabeth Anscombe wrote books and articles on a wide range of topics, including the ground-breaking monograph Intention. Her work is original, challenging, often difficult, always insightful; but it has frequently been misunderstood, and its overall significance is still not fully appreciated. This book is the first major study of Anscombe's philosophical oeuvre. In it, Roger Teichmann presents Anscombe's main ideas, bringing out their interconnections, elaborating and discussing their implications, pointing out (...)
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  49. Ishtiyaque Haji & Michael Mckenna (2011). Disenabling Levy's Frankfurt-Style Enabling Cases. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):400-414.score: 18.0
    Recently, Neil Levy has proposed that an agent can acquire freedom-relevant agential abilities by virtue of the conditions in which she finds herself, and in this way, can be thought of as partially constituted by those conditions. This can be so even if the agent is completely ignorant of the relevant environmental conditions, and even if these conditions play no causal role in what the agent does. Drawing upon these resources, Levy argues that Frankfurt-style examples are not cogent. (...)
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  50. Lisa Shapiro (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The Union of Soul and Body and the Practice of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (3):503 – 520.score: 18.0
    (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The union of soul and body and the practice of philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 503-520. doi: 10.1080/09608789908571042.
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