Search results for 'Elizabeth Lord' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Elizabeth Lord (1989). Human History and the Kingdom of God: Past Perspectives and Those of J. L. Segundo. Heythrop Journal 30 (3):293–305.
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  2. Elizabeth Lord (1989). Finding a Perspective on Vatican II. Heythrop Journal 30 (2):179–183.
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  3. Wilberforce Lord (1985). The Academics and Lord Denning. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 5 (3).
     
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  4. Francis Bacon (1877). The Works of Lord Bacon, Moral and Historical Including His Essays, Civil and Moral, Apophthegms, Advancement of Learning, Wisdom of the Ancients, New Atlantis, Julius Caesar, Life of Henry Vii., Queen Elizabeth, Etc., with a Brief Memoir of the Author. Ward.
     
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  5.  34
    Sally Ramage (forthcoming). BELLE- LORD MANSFIELD'S GREAT-NIECE. Criminal Law News (85).
    This is the review of a book by Paula Byrne on Lord Mansfield's great-niece whom he raised as his own daughter. Lord Mansfield was the Lord Chief Justice of England in the Eighteenth Century. The child was brought to him as an infant and grew up to become what we would today term his paralegal clerk in his Library at Kenwood House. His great-niece was the child of a black slave and his sister's son, Sir John Lindsay. (...)
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  6. Sally Ramage (2015). Criminal Law Journals Chief Editor. [REVIEW] Current Criminal Law ISSN 1758-8405 7 (4).
    Dido Belle was the illegitimate daughter of a slave woman and a captain in the British Royal Navy. Dido Belle was raised by her great-uncle, the Lord Chief Justice of England, Lord Mansfield, William Murray. Lord Mansfield was one of the most powerful men of the 18th Century. He has, when Dido was a young-lady, commissioned a portrait of Dido and Elizabeth who both lived with Lord and Lady Mansfield under their wardship. This paper tells (...)
     
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  7. Elizabeth Helsinger (1987). Clare and the Place of the Peasant Poet. Critical Inquiry 13 (3):509-531.
    One might say that Clare is almost by virtue of that label alone a political poet. “Peasant poet” is a contradiction in terms from the perspective of English literary history, or of the longer history of the literary pastoral. The phrase must refer to two different social locations, and as such makes social place an explicit, problematic concern for the middle-class readers of that poet’s work. To Clare’s publisher and patrons in the 1820s, as to his editors in the 1980s, (...)
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  8.  14
    Glyn Parry (2012). Occult Philosophy and Politics: Why John Dee Wrote His Compendious Rehearsal in November 1592. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):480-488.
    John Dee’s autobiographical Compendious rehearsal, written in November 1592, not only reveals the close connection between occult philosophy and high Elizabethan politics through its contents, but also through the circumstances that brought it into existence. Dee’s Court career shows a clear pattern, in which events sometimes aligned to make his occult philosophy useful to senior politicians, boosting his status at Court. One such series of events occurred in 1591–2, when Lord Burghley used Dee’s prediction of a Spanish conquest of (...)
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  9.  14
    Karen E. Tatum (2010). Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which (...)
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  10.  6
    José Igor Prieto-Arranz (2015). Whiggish History for Contemporary Audiences. Implicit Religion in Shekhar Kapur's Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (41):52-78.
    As James Chapman has famously put it in National Identity and the British Historical Film, historical films are “as much about the present in which they are made as they are about [the] past in which they are set.” This article discusses Shekhar Kapur’s aesthetically ground-breaking Elizabeth and its sequel Elizabeth: The Golden Age focusing on two main aspects, namely national identity issues and the representation of the enemy. Kapur’s Elizabeth films will first be placed within the (...)
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  11.  1
    C. B. Tkacz (2003). Singing Women's Words as Sacramental Mimesis. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 70 (2):275-328.
    Singing and praying in the words of biblical men and women is basic to sacramental mimesis, i.e., Christian imitation of the actions of the saints with the intention of thereby opening themselves to grace. This evidence counters the “voiceless victim” paradigm prevalent in much feminist scholarship. In pre-Christian Jewish liturgy, the song of Miriam after the Crossing of the Red Sea was already important in the annual celebration of the Passover. Jesus emphasized the spiritual equality of the sexes in his (...)
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  12.  14
    John Sutton (2001). Francis Bacon. In Encyclopedia of the life sciences. Macmillan 471.
    Francis Bacon was the youngest son of Nicholas Bacon, lord keeper of the great seal under Elizabeth I. He left Cambridge in 1575, studied law, and entered Parliament in 1581. Though roughly contemporary with Kepler, Galileo, and Harvey, Bacon’s grand schemes for the advancement of knowledge were not driven by their discoveries: he resisted the Copernican hypothesis, and did not give mathematics a central place in his vision of natural philosophy. His active public life, under both Elizabeth (...)
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  13.  5
    Norman Ford (2006). Cooperation in Unethical Actions of Others. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (1):1.
    Ford, Norman Lord Brennan, a Catholic Lawyer, chaired an inquiry into the allegations following criticism of certain unethical practices performed in St John and Elizabeth, a large London Catholic Private Hospital, thus providing an opportunity to reflect on the ethics of cooperating in the unethical actions of others. It is recommended that the opinion of a hospital's select group of staff, an ethicist and/or moral theologian would help discern when a proportionately critical cause justifies cooperation and hence collusion (...)
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  14. Johannes Türk (2008). The Intrusion: Carl Schmitt's Non-Mimetic Logic of Art. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2008 (142):73-89.
    The facts are known: The death of the queen seems imminent, while the decision on her successor has not yet been made. And while Queen Elizabeth's end, and with it the transition of power, is anticipated, political complications arise: the most apt successor of the childless heir is the Scottish prince James, whose great-grandmother was a daughter of Charles VII of England. But his mother's lover, the Earl of Bothwell, has killed James's father, Lord Darnley. And Maria Stewart (...)
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  15.  30
    Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.
  16. Anne Buchanan & Ellen Buchanan Weiss (2011). Of Sad and Wished-For Years: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Lifelong Illness. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):479-503.
    Victorian poets Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861) and Robert Browning (1812-1889) first fell in love through letters, which they began to write to each other in 1845 (Figures 1 and 2). Their growing relationship, slowly progressing from letter to first encounter and eventual secret marriage in 1846, is documented in two volumes of letters, with a plot that unfolds as warmly and compellingly as the best page-turner invented by a novelist. Both were master wordsmiths, so the beauty of their letters (...)
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  17.  62
    Roger Teichmann (2008). The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe. Oxford University Press.
    One of the most important philosophers of recent times, Elizabeth Anscombe wrote books and articles on a wide range of topics, including the ground-breaking monograph Intention. Her work is original, challenging, often difficult, always insightful; but it has frequently been misunderstood, and its overall significance is still not fully appreciated. This book is the first major study of Anscombe's philosophical oeuvre. In it, Roger Teichmann presents Anscombe's main ideas, bringing out their interconnections, elaborating and discussing their implications, pointing (...)
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  18.  47
    Joseph Long (2014). In Defence of Cornell Realism: A Reply to Elizabeth Tropman. Theoria 80 (2):174-183.
    Cornell realists claim, among other things, that moral knowledge can be acquired in the same basic way that scientific knowledge is acquired. Recently in this journal Elizabeth Tropman has presented two arguments against this claim. In the present article, I attempt to show that the first argument attacks a straw man and the second mischaracterizes the Cornell realists' epistemology and ends up begging the question. I close by suggesting that, given Tropman's own apparent views, her objections are also (...)
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  19. Mari Mikkola (2006). Elizabeth Spelman, Gender Realism, and Women. Hypatia 21 (4):77-96.
    : Elizabeth Spelman has famously argued against gender realism (the view that women have some feature in common that makes them women). By and large, feminist philosophers have embraced Spelman's arguments and deemed gender realist positions counterproductive. To the contrary, Mikkola shows that Spelman's arguments do not in actual fact give good reason to reject gender realism in general. She then suggests a way to understand gender realism that does not have the adverse consequences feminist philosophers commonly think (...)
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  20.  3
    Elizabeth S. Anderson (1995). The Democratic University: The Role of Justice in the Production of Knowledge*: ELIZABETH S. ANDERSON. Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):186-219.
    What is the proper role of politics in higher education? Many policies and reforms in the academy, from affirmative action and a multicultural curriculum to racial and sexual harassment codes and movements to change pedagogical styles, seek justice for oppressed groups in society. They understand justice to require a comprehensive equality of membership: individuals belonging to different groups should have equal access to educational opportunities; their interests and cultures should be taken equally seriously as worthy subjects of study, their persons (...)
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  21.  90
    D. Solomon (2008). Elizabeth Anscombe's "Modern Moral Philosophy": Fifty Years Later. Christian Bioethics 14 (2):109-122.
    Extracts This article introduces an issue of Christian bioethics which examines the significance of Elizabeth Anscombe's classic article, “Modern Moral Philosophy”, on the 50th anniversary of its publication. The manifold influences of this article are explored in some detail and the current status of the three famous theses put forward by Anscombe in the article is assessed. This article also briefly introduces the other articles in this issue and loactes them within the general framework of contemporary discussions of (...)
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  22.  25
    James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of at-Will Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119 - 130.
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications of (...)
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  23.  38
    Ralph Wedgwood (2012). Review: Elizabeth Brake, Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    This is a review of Elizabeth Brake's book Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).
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  24.  67
    Lisa Shapiro (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The Union of Soul and Body and the Practice of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (3):503 – 520.
    (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The union of soul and body and the practice of philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 503-520. doi: 10.1080/09608789908571042.
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  25.  16
    Martin Barker (2006). Envisaging 'Visualisation': Some Challenges From the International Lord of the Rings Audience Project. Film-Philosophy 10 (3):1-25.
    This essay explores a series of issues which have emerged around the term ‘visualisation’ asa result of materials generated out of the international Lord of the Rings audience project.‘Visualisation’ is quite widely used as a term in film studies, but not much considered. In this essay I begin from someelements of empirical evidence, and through some unlikely encounters that these spurredwith bodies of work from outside film studies, I develop an argument for a new approach tothinking about ‘visualisation’. (...)
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  26.  3
    Regina Morantz-Sanchez (1992). Feminist Theory and Historical Practice: Rereading Elizabeth Blackwell. History and Theory 31:51-69.
    This essay assesses the value of social constructivist theories of science to the history of medicine. It highlights particularly the ways in which feminist theorists have turned their attention to gender as a category of analysis in scientific thinking, producing an approach to modern science that asks how it became identified with "male" objectivity, reason, and mind, set in opposition to "female" subjectivity, feeling, and nature.In the history of medicine this new work has allowed a group of scholars to better (...)
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  27. G. E. M. Anscombe & Roger Teichmann (eds.) (2000). Logic, Cause & Action: Essays in Honour of Elizabeth Anscombe. Cambridge University Press.
    Elizabeth Anscombe is among the most distinguished and original philosophers alive today. Her work has ranged over many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of mind and action, and the philosophy of religion. In each of these areas she has made seminal contributions. The essays in this book reflect the breadth of her interests and the esteem in which she is held by her colleagues. The distinguished contributors include Michael Dunnett, Nancy Cartwright, Peter Geach and Philippa (...)
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  28.  8
    John Sutton (1999). Elizabeth A. Wilson, Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (4):299-301.
    Writing within and against the set critical practices of psychoanalytic-deconstructive-Foucauldian-feminist cultural theory, Elizabeth Wilson demonstrates, in this provocative and original book, the productivity and the pleasure of direct, complicitous engagement with the contemporary cognitive sciences. Wilson forges an eclectic method in reaction to the 'zealous but disavowed moralism' of those high cultural Theorists whose 'disciplining compulsion' concocts a monolithic picture of science in order to keep their 'sanitizing critical practice' untainted by its sinister reductionism. Her unsettling accounts of (...)
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  29.  38
    David Hodgson (2008). The Knowledge Argument: A Response to Elizabeth Schier. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):112-115.
    I much appreciated Elizabeth Schier's paper on Frank Jackson's knowledge argument, published in the January 2008 issue of Journal of Consciousness Studies (Schier, 2008) -- in part, I confess, because of resonances with my gestalt argument for free will (Hodgson, 2001; 2002; 2005; 2007a,b). I would like to offer two comments on this paper.
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  30.  6
    Wade L. Robison (2013). Hume the Moral Historian: Queen Elizabeth I. The European Legacy 18 (5):576-587.
    Hume was accused of partiality as soon as the first volume of his Histories reached the public. No better test can be found for whether he was partial than by looking at how he writes of Queen Elizabeth I. If his history is biased, we would expect her sex to make a difference to the history. We shall find, however, that Hume treats Elizabeth as a rational being who is a sovereign, and that he achieves, insofar (...)
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  31.  9
    Patricia Elizabeth Cossío Torres (2005). Patricia Elizabeth Cossío Torres." Factores psicosociales asociados a conductas de riesgo de una población de adolescentes de bachillerato". Episteme 1 (3).
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  32.  9
    Rémi Clot-Goudard (2014). Valérie Aucouturier, Elizabeth Anscombe. L’esprit en pratique. Paris, CNRS, 2012, 230 pages, 25 €. [REVIEW] Astérion 12.
    Dans le monde philosophique anglophone, Elizabeth Anscombe fait déjà partie des références incontournables. Son nom est généralement associé à celui de Wittgenstein dont elle fut l’un des principaux éditeurs et traducteurs. Mais elle est aussi l’auteure reconnue de deux contributions majeures : Intention , à l’origine du renouveau contemporain de la philosophie de l’action, et « Modern moral philosophy » , qui ouvrit la voie au retour de l’éthique des vertus. La philos..
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  33.  10
    Elizabeth A. Behnke (1992). Study Project in Phenomenology of the Body Elizabeth A. Behnke, Ph. D. Man and World 25 (521).
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  34.  9
    John Sutton (1999). Review of Elizabeth A. Wilson, Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review/ Comptes Rendus Philosophiques:299-301.
    Writing within and against the set critical practices of psychoanalytic-deconstructive-Foucauldian-feminist cultural theory, Elizabeth Wilson demonstrates, in this provocative and original book, the productivity and the pleasure of direct, complicitous engagement with the contemporary cognitive sciences. Wilson forges an eclectic method in reaction to the 'zealous but disavowed moralism' of those high cultural Theorists whose 'disciplining compulsion' concocts a monolithic picture of science in order to keep their 'sanitizing critical practice' untainted by its sinister reductionism. Her unsettling accounts of (...)
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  35.  3
    S. Laing (1983). Review Articles: Advertising and Consumption: Advertising and Social Change by Ronald Berman, Beverley Hills and London: Sage, , 1981, Pp 159, 11.95 and 5.50 The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981 Pp 248, 1.75 Conspicuous Consumption by Roger S Mason, Farnbrough: Gower, 1981, Pp X + 156, 9.50 Channels of Desire by Stuart Ewen and Elizabeth Ewen, New York and London: McGraw-Hill, 1982, Pp Viii + 312, $7.95. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 1 (3):142-149.
    Advertising and Consumption: Advertising and Social Change by Ronald Berman, Beverley Hills and London: Sage, , 1981, pp 159, £11.95 and £5.50 The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981 pp 248, £1.75 Conspicuous Consumption by Roger S Mason, Farnbrough: Gower, 1981, pp x + 156, £9.50 Channels of Desire by Stuart Ewen and Elizabeth Ewen, New York and London: McGraw-Hill, 1982, pp viii + 312, $7.95.
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  36.  28
    Efraim Podoksik (2009). Commentary on Elizabeth Corey's Interpretation of Michael Oakeshott. Zygon 44 (1):223-226.
    Elizabeth Corey suggests that in order to understand Michael Oakeshott's worldview one should pay special attention to two subjects, religion and aesthetics, and analyze the connection between these two realms and the idea of practical life in general and of politics in particular. Her book provides a sympathetic but also critical conversation with Oakeshott's ideas, ultimately offering us a coherent picture of the place of the religious, poetical, and political in the totality of his thought. Corey persuasively shows (...)
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  37.  9
    Magno Francisco de Jesus Santos (2011). A Súdita do Senhor dos Milagres e os Bastidores da Festa de Passos em Sergipe (The subjects of the Lord of Miracles and the backstage Party Steps into Sergipe) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n20p114. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (20):114-126.
    Todos os anos, no segundo final de semana da quaresma é realizada em São Cristóvão a mais importante manifestação festiva católica de Sergipe. Trata-se da Festa de Passos, que reúne romeiros dos mais variados municípios sergipanos, com pagamento de promessas, práticas penitenciais e conflitos. Ao longo do século XX um nome importante que participou ativamente dos bastidores da solenidade foi o de Maria Paiva Monteiro, professora, religiosa, madrinha dos cristovenses e considerada a guardiã da memória da romaria dos Passos. Nesse (...)
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  38.  7
    Greta Jones (2006). Women and Eugenics in Britain: The Case of Mary Scharlieb, Elizabeth Sloan Chesser, and Stella Browne. Annals of Science 52 (5):481-502.
    (1995). Women and eugenics in Britain: The case of Mary Scharlieb, Elizabeth Sloan Chesser, and Stella Browne. Annals of Science: Vol. 52, No. 5, pp. 481-502.
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  39.  18
    Tanya Collings (2011). Frankenstein and Feminism: Contemplating The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):66-68.
    Theodore Roszak's compelling parable, The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, provides an (eco)-feminist view of the “Night of the Living Dead Model” and suggests that only the equal union of “masculine” and “feminine” energies will help us resolve the current eco-crisis. This article further explores the consequences of the highly masculinized post-Enlightenment rationalism as demonstrated in Roszak's novel. Although this article agrees that there is a dangerous imbalance between natural/spiritual and scientific/rational viewpoints, it also stresses that the extreme genderification (...)
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  40.  5
    M. Eugene Boring (1986). The Theology of Revelation “The Lord Our God the Almighty Reigns”. Interpretation 40 (3):257-269.
    The representative summary of John's theology is the hymnic word drawn from the heavenly worship in which the church of that day—and ours—is invited to join: “Alleluiah! The Lord our God the Almighty reigns.”.
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  41.  6
    Amy R. Baehr (2009). Conservatism, Feminism, and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. Hypatia 24 (2):101 - 124.
    This paper is a philosophical reconstruction of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's thinking about women and feminism, and an inquiry into whether there is a conservative form of feminism. The paper argues that Fox-Genovese's endorsement of conventional social forms (like traditional marriage, motherhood, and sexual morality) contrasts strongly with feminism's criticism of these forms, and feminism's claim that they should be transformed. The paper concludes, however, that one need not call Fox-Genovese's thought "feminist" to recognize it as serious advocacy on behalf of (...)
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  42.  6
    Carlos Sonnenschein (2008). Book Review of "The Estrogen Elixir: A History of Hormone Replacement Therapy in America" by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):1-.
    The Estrogen Elixir: A History of Hormone Replacement Therapy in America by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins is a thoroughly documented cautionary tale of the information and advice offered to women in the perimenopausal period of their life, and the consequences of exposure to sexual hormones on their health and wellbeing.
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  43.  16
    D. B. Hogan & A. M. Clarfield (2007). Venerable or Vulnerable: Ageing and Old Age in JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Medical Humanities 33 (1):5-10.
    An underappreciated aspect of The lord of the rings by JRR Tolkien is in how the author dealt with death, longevity and ageing in the work. During his early years, Tolkien endured first the passing of both parents and then the deaths of most of his friends during the First World War. It was not surprising that a search for the meaning of life and death became a preoccupation of Tolkien. Tolkien’s Roman Catholic faith underpinned his thoughts about (...)
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  44.  5
    Dominic Green & Marsha Keith Schuchard (2013). “Our Protestant Rabbin” a Dialogue on the Conversion/Apostasy of Lord George Gordon. Common Knowledge 19 (2):283-314.
    This article comprises a dialogue between two historians who have attempted, individually, to narrate the life of Lord George Gordon (1751 – 93), the Scottish prophet, revolutionary, and convert to Judaism. For modern cultural historians, Gordon's peregrinations between identities offer a kaleidoscopic view of Britain in the overlooked but crucial interstice between the upheavals of 1776 and 1789. Yet the partial nature of the evidence, the long omission of Gordon from the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain, and the complex, often (...)
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  45.  5
    Elizabeth Schirmer (2010). Jennifer N. Brown, Three Women of Liège: A Critical Edition of and Commentary on the Middle English Lives of Elizabeth of Spalbeek, Christina Mirabilis, and Marie d'Oignies. Turnhout: Brepols, 2008. Pp. Viii, 348. €70. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):648-649.
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  46.  5
    Laura Janara (2006). Machiavelli, Elizabeth I and the Innovative Historical Self: A Politics of Action, Not Identity. History of Political Thought 27 (3):455-485.
    To contribute to contemporary debates about the human self, historical constitutedness and capacity for critical agency, I turn to Niccolo Machiavelli's account of human virtuosity. There I retrieve a vision of political action that centres on a critically conscious intelligence or 'I' engaged in the continual fracturing and manipulation of identity. Machiavelli shows this critical intelligence to be something developed by way of a mental standpoint I call critical in-betweenness -- a disposition that imperfectly enables positive political innovation. To account (...)
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  47.  19
    Yaffa Wolfman (2004). The Devil and the Good Lord: What Did Goethe's Faust Contribute to Sartre's Play? Sartre Studies International 10 (2):182-194.
    In this article we shall attempt to show that despite the originality of Sartre's writings and the original philosophical views they contain, his reliance on Goethe's Faust in The Devil and the Good Lord proves that he was quite familiar with the components of the former and made intensive use of them in his own play. A comparative analysis of the two texts will show that Sartre exploited any ethical problem, human act, historical name and fact which he was (...)
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  48.  3
    Elizabeth D. Whitaker (2012). Unraveled: A Weaver's Tale of Life Gone Modern. Elizabeth L.Krause. Berkeley: University of California Press. 2009. Xii + 282 Pp. [REVIEW] Ethos 40 (1):1-3.
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  49.  11
    Yang Shang (1928). The Book of Lord Shang. London, A. Probsthain.
    Shang, Yang. The Book of Lord Shang. A Classic of the Chinese School of Law. Translated from the Chinese with Introduction and Notes by Dr. J.J.L. Duyvendak.
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  50.  14
    Dimitris Vardoulakis (2009). Beside(S): Elizabeth Presa with Jacques Derrida. Derrida Today 2 (2):200-209.
    This paper explores the way that Elizabeth Presa's artworks respond to Jacques Derrida's thought. By examining how the particularity (the beside) and its supplements (the besides) operate in Presa's works, it is shown how this movement between beside and besides is also central to Derrida's thought.
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