Search results for 'Elizabeth S. Scott' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth D. Scott & Karen A. Jehn (2003). About Face: How Employee Dishonesty Influences a Stakeholder's Image of an Organization. Business and Society 42 (2):234-266.
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  2.  7
    Karen A. Jehn & Elizabeth D. Scott (2008). Perceptions of Deception: Making Sense of Responses to Employee Deceit. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):327 - 347.
    In this research, we examine the effects that customer perceptions of employee deception have on the customers’ attitudes toward an organization. Based on interview, archival, and observational data within the international airline industry, we develop a model to explain the complex effects of perceived dishonesty on observer’s attitudes and intentions toward the airline. The data revealed three types of perceived deceit (about beliefs, intentions, and emotions) and three additional factors that influence customer intentions and attitudes: the players involved, the beneficiaries (...)
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  3.  2
    Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu & Alejandro Arturo Vallega (eds.) (2001). Companion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    Companion to Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy Edited by Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu, and Alejandro Vallega A key to unlocking one of Heidegger’s most difficult and important works. The publication of the first English translation of Martin Heidegger’s Beiträge zur Philosophie marked a significant event for Heidegger studies. Considered by scholars to be his most important work after Being and Time, Contributions to Philosophy elaborates what Heidegger calls "being-historical-thinking," a project in which he undertakes to reshape what (...)
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  4. C. B. Cohen, S. E. Wheeler & D. A. Scott (2000). Prayer is Therapy-Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler, and David A. Scott Reply. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):5-5.
     
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  5. M. Hyland Gurevich, G. Kreisel, G. Longo, D. S. Scott & D. van Dalen (1986). The Philosophy Department of the Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht Organizes the Conference “Church's Theses After Fifty Years”. Among the Invited Speakers Are E. Borger, RO Gandy, J.-Y. Girard, Y. [REVIEW] Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 30:330.
     
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  6.  18
    C. A. Niven & P. A. Scott (2003). The Need for Accurate Perception and Informed Judgement in Determining the Appropriate Use of the Nursing Resource: Hearing the Patient's Voice. Nursing Philosophy 4 (3):201-210.
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  7.  8
    Elizabeth D. Scott & Karen A. Jehn (2003). Multiple Stakeholder Judgments of Employee Behaviors: A Contingent Prototype Model of Dishonesty. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):235 - 250.
    This paper describes the moral judgments made by various stakeholders in determining whether an event, caused by an organizational employee, constitutes dishonesty. It models person-situation interaction effects of situations in organizational settings and persons making moral judgments to predict judgments of dishonesty. Using a prototype definition of dishonesty, the paper examines the effects of differences in four areas (the prototypicality of the act, the actor''s motivation, the potential consequences, and the person judging the event) on the moral judgment of whether (...)
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  8. Dayna Nadine Scott (2009). “Gender-Benders”: Sex and Law in the Constitution of Polluted Bodies. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):241-265.
    This paper explores how law might conceive of the injury or harm of endocrine disruption as it applies to an aboriginal community experiencing chronic chemical pollution. The effect of the pollution in this case is not only gendered, but gendering: it seems to be causing the ‘production’ of two girl babies for every boy born on the reserve. This presents an opening to interrogate how law is implicated in the constitution of not just gender but sex. The analysis takes an (...)
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  9.  10
    Dominic Scott, Plato's Meno.
    Given its brevity, Plato's Meno covers an astonishingly wide array of topics: politics, education, virtue, definition, philosophical method, mathematics, the nature and acquisition of knowledge and immortality. Its treatment of these, though profound, is tantalisingly short, leaving the reader with many unresolved questions. This book confronts the dialogue's many enigmas and attempts to solve them in a way that is both lucid and sympathetic to Plato's philosophy. Reading the dialogue as a whole, it explains how different arguments are related to (...)
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  10.  34
    Charles E. Scott (2001). The Birth of an Identity: A Response to Del McWhorter's Bodies and Pleasures. Hypatia 16 (3):106 - 114.
    First, I engage Del McWhorter's confessional voice in the context of her thought and emphasize her claim that even "objective knowledge" often has an indirectly confessional aspect. Second, I give an account of the value of historicity and genealogy in McWhorter's understanding of knowing and subjectivity. Third, I address her reconfiguration of the subjectivity of desiring by prioritizing pleasure in the project of "becoming truly gay." Finally, I assess the meaning of her phrase, "straying afield from myself.".
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  11.  3
    Gary Alan Scott (2000). Plato's Socrates as Educator. State University of New York Press.
    Examines and evaluates Socrates' role as an educator in Plato's dialogues.
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  12.  19
    David Scott (1998). Leibniz's Model of Creation and His Doctrine of Substance. Animus 3 (4):73-88.
    It is well known that Leibniz's advances metaphysical, logical and moral reasons why monads possess their own force of action; but what is not well known is that he also advances an account of the divine creative act in explicit support of force-endowed monads. This paper's goal is to highlight and critically examine this doctrine of creation, and to contrast it with the doctrine of creation underlying the occasionalist denial that substances possess their own force of action.
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  13.  1
    Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu & Alejandro Arturo Vallega (eds.) (2001). Companion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    In theCompanion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophyan international group of fourteen Heidegger scholars shares strategies for reading and understanding this challenging work.
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  14.  54
    Dominic Scott (2000). Plato's Critique of the Democratic Character. Phronesis 45 (1):19-37.
    This paper tackles some issues arising from Plato's account of the democratic man in Rep. VIII. One problem is that Plato tends to analyse him in terms of the desires that he fulfils, yet sends out conflicting signals about exactly what kind of desires are at issue. Scholars are divided over whether all of the democrat's desires are appetites. There is, however, strong evidence against seeing him as exclusively appetitive: rather he is someone who satisfies desires from all three parts (...)
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  15.  39
    Dominic Scott (2000). Plato's Critique of the Democratic Character. Phronesis 45 (1):19 - 37.
    This paper tackles some issues arising from Plato's account of the democratic man in Rep. VIII. One problem is that Plato tends to analyse him in terms of the desires that he fulfils, yet sends out conflicting signals about exactly what kind of desires are at issue. Scholars are divided over whether all of the democrat's desires are appetites. There is, however, strong evidence against seeing him as exclusively appetitive: rather he is someone who satisfies desires from all three parts (...)
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  16.  11
    B. Scott (2009). Conversation, Individuals and Concepts: Some Key Concepts in Gordon Pask's Interaction of Actors and Conversation Theories. Constructivist Foundations 4 (3):151 - 158.
    Purpose: Gordon Pask has left behind a voluminous scientific oeuvre in which he frequently uses technical language and a detail of argument that makes his work difficult to access except by the most dedicated of students. His ideas have also evolved over a long period. This paper provides introductions to three of Pask's key concepts: "conversations," "individuals," and "concepts." Method: Based on the author's close knowledge of Pask's work, as his collaborator for ten years and as someone who has had (...)
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  17.  11
    Alan Scott (2012). A Desperate Comedy: Hope and Alienation in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):448-460.
    This article is both a personal response to Samuel Beckett?s Waiting for Godot and an examination of the concept within literature of making the strange familiar and making the familiar strange. It discusses the educative force and potential of Beckett?s strangers in a strange world by examining my own personal experiences with the play. At the same time the limitations of Beckett?s theatre are explored through the contrast with the work of Berthold Brecht, who sought to make the familiar strange (...)
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  18.  6
    John A. Scott (2012). Who’s Where? Environment, Space, Place 4 (2):7-24.
    Central to several current philosophical projects is determining which conversational conventions will best locate and accommodate all the required participants. This article follows Troy Paddock’s lead in exploring a number of conventions currently on offer, particularly Heidegger’s aesthetic nearness-to-hand and Latour’s scientific Actor-Network-Theory. This article also introduces Donald Davidson’s social triangulation as a complementary model of approach: one thatimplicates propositional agents in potentially revealing relations. It concludes that a close study of implicational, as distinct from inferential, argument and judgment may (...)
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  19.  8
    Emma Scott (2014). The Visionary Psyche: Jung's Analytical Psychology and Its Impact on Theories of Shamanic Imagery. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):91-115.
    This article considers the shaman's visionary encounters with spirit beings from the critical viewpoint of several innovative theories of shamanism: Richard Noll's cognitive approach and Michael Winkelman's neurophenomenological perspective. These distinct approaches are analyzed in light of Jung's central concepts of the archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the individuation process, which have had a huge formative influence upon the academic investigation of visions and spiritual experiences. The centrality of Jung's theoretical reasoning within these recent studies of shamanism strongly demonstrates the (...)
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  20.  4
    John A. Scott (2012). Who's Where? Environment, Space, Place 4 (2):7-24.
    Central to several current philosophical projects is determining which conversational conventions will best locate and accommodate all the required participants. This article follows Troy Paddock’s lead in exploring a number of conventions currently on offer, particularly Heidegger’s aesthetic nearness-to-hand and Latour’s scientific Actor-Network-Theory. This article also introduces Donald Davidson’s social triangulation as a complementary model of approach: one thatimplicates propositional agents in potentially revealing relations. It concludes that a close study of implicational, as distinct from inferential, argument and judgment may (...)
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  21.  6
    Charles E. Scott (2001). The Birth of an Identity: A Response to Del McWhorter's. Hypatia 16 (3).
    : First, I engage Del McWhorter's confessional voice in the context of her thought and emphasize her claim that even "objective knowledge" often has an indirectly confessional aspect. Second, I give an account of the value of historicity and genealogy in McWhorter's understanding of knowing and subjectivity. Third, I address her reconfiguration of the subjectivity of desiring by prioritizing pleasure in the project of "becoming truly gay." Finally, I assess the meaning of her phrase, "straying afield from myself.".
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  22.  5
    Campbell L. Scott & Henderikus J. Stam (1996). The Psychological Subject and Harré's Social Psychology: An Analysis of a Constructionist Case. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (4):327-352.
    Taking Rom Harré's social constructionism as a focus we point to and discuss the issue of the a priori psychological subject in social constructionist theory. While Harré indicates that interacting, intending beings are necessary for conversation to occur, he assumes that the primary human reality is conversation and that psychological life emerges from this social domain. Nevertheless, we argue that a fundamental and agentive psychological subject is implicit to his constructionist works. Our critical analyses focus upon Harré's understandings of persons, (...)
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  23.  11
    Bernard Scott (2001). Gordon Pask's Conversation Theory: A Domain Independent Constructivist Model of Human Knowing. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 6 (4):343-360.
    Although it is conceded that distinct knowledge domains do presentparticular problems of coming to know, in thispaper it is argued that it is possible to construct a domain independent modelof the processes of coming to know, one inwhich observers share understandings and do soin agreed ways. The model in question is partof the conversation theory of Gordon Pask. CT, as a theory of theory construction andcommunication, has particular relevance forfoundational issues in science and scienceeducation. CT explicitly propounds a ``radicalconstructivist'' epistemology. (...)
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  24.  2
    Frederick J. Down Scott (1976). A Note on James's Aid of Peirce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 12 (1):71 - 76.
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  25.  1
    Charles E. Scott (1968). Schleiermacher and the Problem of Divine Immediacy: CHARLES E. SCOTT. Religious Studies 3 (2):499-512.
    A problem which was widely recognised during Schleiermacher's life, and one which I think is not yet satisfactorily solved, concerned the integration of feeling and concepts within human consciousness. Within the domain of philosophy of religion it may be phrased as follows: How does religious feeling relate to rational reflection such that each complements and enriches the other? Schleiermacher was convinced that religion never originates in human understanding or autonomy and that one's understanding of the world is not necessarily dependent (...)
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  26.  1
    B. Scott (2013). Author's Response: Explaining Cognition and Explaining Explaining. Constructivist Foundations 9 (1):143-146.
    Upshot: I thank Mallen for providing some historical background concerning the origin of the Typist models and for helping clarify the theoretical issues addressed and motivations for creating the models. Whilst de Zeeuw acknowledges the Typist models as a useful contribution to first-order cybernetics, he questions their relevance for second-order cybernetics. I argue that, in the context of research on human learning, de Zeeuw’s characterisation is third- rather than second-order. Stewart questions the status of the model with respect to the (...)
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  27. Gary Alan Scott & William A. Welton (2009). Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium. State University of New York Press.
    _A lively and highly readable commentary on one of Plato’s most beloved dialogues._.
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  28. Dominic Scott (2015). Levels of Argument: A Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    Dominic Scott compares the Republic and Nicomachean Ethics from a methodological perspective. He argues that Plato and Aristotle distinguish similar levels of argument in the defence of justice, and that they both follow the same approach: Plato because he thinks it will suffice, Aristotle because he thinks there is no need to go beyond it.
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  29. Gary Alan Scott (ed.) (2007). Philosophy in Dialogue: Plato's Many Devices. Northwestern University Press.
    Traditional Plato scholarship, in the English-speaking world, has assumed that Platonic dialogues are merely collections of arguments. Inevitably, the question arises: If Plato wanted to present collections of arguments, why did he write dialogues instead of treatises? Concerned about this question, some scholars have been experimenting with other, more contextualized ways of reading the dialogues. This anthology is among the first to present these new approaches as pursued by a variety of scholars. As such, it offers new perspectives on Plato (...)
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  30. John T. Scott (2016). The Routledge Guidebook to Machiavelli's the Prince. Routledge.
    Niccolò Machiavelli’s _The Prince_ is one of the most influential works in the history of political thought and the adjective Machiavellian is well-known and perhaps even over-used. So why does the meaning of the text continue to be debated to the present day? And how does a contemporary reader get to grips with a book full of references to the politics of the early 16 th Century? The Routledge Guidebook to Machiavelli’s The Prince provides readers with the historical background, textual (...)
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  31. Kimberly Scott & Allison Henward (eds.) (2016). Women Education Scholars and Their Children's Schooling. Routledge.
    This volume offers both theoretical and research-based accounts from mothers in academia who must balance their own intricate knowledge of school systems, curriculum and pedagogy with their children’s education and school lives. It explores the contextual advantages and disadvantages of "knowing too much" and how this impacts children’s actions, scholastics and developing consciousness along various lines. Additionally, it allows teachers, administrators and researchers to critically examine their own discourses and those of their students to better navigate their professional and domestic (...)
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  32. William O. Scott (2006). "A Woman's Thought Runs Before Her Actions": Vows as Speech Acts in As You Like It. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):528-539.
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  33.  86
    Alexander D. Scott & Michael Scott (1997). What’s in the Two Envelope Paradox? Analysis 57 (1):34–41.
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  34.  18
    Drusilla Scott (1987). A Reply to Dorothy Emmet on Michael Polanyi's Idea of Truth. Tradition and Discovery 15 (2):33-36.
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  35.  69
    Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of learning in relation to (...)
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  36.  7
    Carolyn McGettigan & Sophie K. Scott (2012). Cortical Asymmetries in Speech Perception: What's Wrong, What's Right and What's Left? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):269-276.
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  37.  18
    Drusilla Scott (1985). Michael Polanyi's Humor. Tradition and Discovery 13 (2):37-38.
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  38.  17
    Mary Scott (1995). U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich. Business Ethics 9 (5):24-27.
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  39.  14
    Charles E. Scott (1986). The Pathology of the Father's Rule. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):118-130.
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  40.  20
    Drusilla Scott (1987). Quality but Bristling with Difficulties on Polanyi's View of Reality. Tradition and Discovery 15 (1):14-17.
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  41.  11
    F. E. Fox, G. J. Taylor, M. F. Harris, K. J. Rodham, J. Sutton, J. Scott & B. Robinson (2010). "It's Crucial They're Treated as Patients": Ethical Guidance and Empirical Evidence Regarding Treating Doctor-Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):7-11.
    Ethical guidance from the British Medical Association about treating doctor–patients is compared and contrasted with evidence from a qualitative study of general practitioners who have been patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 GPs who had experienced a significant illness. Their experiences were discussed and issues about both being and treating doctor–patients were revealed. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to evaluate the data. In this article data extracts are used to illustrate and discuss three key points that summarise the BMA (...)
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  42.  4
    Lawrence A. Kelley & Michael Scott (2001). On John Allen's Critique of Induction. Bioessays 23 (9):860-861.
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  43.  43
    Michael Scott (1998). The Context of Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Action. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):595-617.
  44.  20
    David Scott (1996). Malebranche's Indirect Realism: A Reply to Steven Nadler. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (1):53 – 78.
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  45.  30
    David Scott (2011). Gilles Deleuze's Contributions to David Hume, Sa Vie, Son Œuvre. Angelaki 16 (2):175 - 180.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 175-180, June 2011.
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  46.  33
    Anita Allen, Anika Maaza Mann, Donna-Dale L. Marcano, Michele Moody-Adams & Jacqueline Scott (2008). Situated Black Women's Voices in/on the Profession of Philosophy. Hypatia 23 (2):160-189.
  47.  23
    Michael Scott (1996). Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Action. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):347-363.
  48.  9
    William T. Scott (1970). A Bridge From Science to Religion Based on Polanyi's Theory of Knowledge. Zygon 5 (1):41-62.
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  49.  30
    David Scott (1992). Doubt and Descartes' a Priori Proof of God's Existence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):101-116.
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  50.  5
    Jacqueline Scott (1999). Editor's Introduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (S1):1-2.
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