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  1. Elizabeth A. Scott (2010). Cockney Plots : Allotments and Grassroots Political Activism. In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  2. Karen A. Jehn & Elizabeth D. Scott (2008). Perceptions of Deception: Making Sense of Responses to Employee Deceit. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):327 - 347.
    In this research, we examine the effects that customer perceptions of employee deception have on the customers’ attitudes toward an organization. Based on interview, archival, and observational data within the international airline industry, we develop a model to explain the complex effects of perceived dishonesty on observer’s attitudes and intentions toward the airline. The data revealed three types of perceived deceit (about beliefs, intentions, and emotions) and three additional factors that influence customer intentions and attitudes: the players involved, the beneficiaries (...)
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  3. Elizabeth D. Scott (2006). Just (?) a True-False Test Applying Signal Detection Theory to Judgments of Organizational Dishonesty. Business and Society 45 (2):130-148.
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  4. Elizabeth D. Scott (2003). Plane Truth: A Qualitative Study of Employee Dishonesty in the Airline Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 42 (4):321 - 337.
    Interviews with flight attendants are analyzed to refine a person-situation model of organizational dishonesty. The refined model suggests that organizational characteristics have direct and indirect (through flight characteristics) effects on likelihood of dishonesty, type of dishonesty, and motivation for dishonesty. The interviews confirm the existence of three motivations for dishonesty in customer service interactions. In addition to the three motivations originally modeled (enrichment, altruism, and revenge), flight attendants demonstrated a fourth: enforce personal moral codes, and a fifth: habituation. The article (...)
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  5. Elizabeth D. Scott & Karen A. Jehn (2003). About Face: How Employee Dishonesty Influences a Stakeholder's Image of an Organization. Business and Society 42 (2):234-266.
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  6. Elizabeth D. Scott & Karen A. Jehn (2003). Multiple Stakeholder Judgments of Employee Behaviors: A Contingent Prototype Model of Dishonesty. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):235 - 250.
    This paper describes the moral judgments made by various stakeholders in determining whether an event, caused by an organizational employee, constitutes dishonesty. It models person-situation interaction effects of situations in organizational settings and persons making moral judgments to predict judgments of dishonesty. Using a prototype definition of dishonesty, the paper examines the effects of differences in four areas (the prototypicality of the act, the actor''s motivation, the potential consequences, and the person judging the event) on the moral judgment of whether (...)
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  7. Elizabeth D. Scott (2002). Organizational Moral Values. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):33-56.
    Abstract: This article argues that the important organizational values to study are organizational moral values. It identifies five moral values (honest communication, respect for property, respect for life, respect for religion, and justice), which allow parallel constructs at individual and organizational levels of analysis. It also identifies dimensions used in differentiating organizations’ moral values. These are the act, actor, person affected, intention, and expected result. Finally, the article addresses measurement issues associated with organizational moral values, proposing that content analysis is (...)
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  8. Elizabeth D. Scott (2000). Moral Values. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):497-521.
    This article suggests that there are individual differences in how people define important moral values, and that these differences are made manifest in differences in the situations. It identifies five dimensions along which individuals can differ in their understandings of values: 1) value category (where the value lies in the hierarchy), 2) agent (how voluntary the action is and whether it is morally required of the agent), 3) object (how close the self is to the object of the action; whether (...)
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  9. Elizabeth D. Scott (2000). Moral Values Fit: Do Applicants Really Care? Teaching Business Ethics 4 (4):405-435.
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  10. Elizabeth D. Scott & Karen A. Jehn (1999). Ranking Rank Behaviors A Comprehensive Situation-Based Definition of Dishonesty. Business and Society 38 (3):296-325.
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  11. Ursula Martin & Elizabeth Scott (1997). The Order Types of Termination Orderings on Monadic Terms, Strings and Monadic Terms, Strings and Multisets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 62 (2):624-635.
    We consider total well-founded orderings on monadic terms satisfying the replacement and full invariance properties. We show that any such ordering on monadic terms in one variable and two unary function symbols must have order type ω, ω 2 or ω ω . We show that a familiar construction gives rise to continuum many such orderings of order type ω. We construct a new family of such orderings of order type ω 2 , and show that there are continuum many (...)
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