Search results for 'Elizabeth Stuart' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth Stuart (1988). The Condemnation of Anglican Orders in the Light of the Roman Catholic Reaction to the Oxford Movement. Heythrop Journal 29 (1):86–98.score: 240.0
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  2. D. Leal (1997). Book Reviews : Christian Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender, Edited by Adrian Thatcher and Elizabeth Stuart. Leominster: Fowler Wright, 1996. Xiv + 478 Pp. Pb. 16.99. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (1):134-138.score: 150.0
  3. Alastair Hamilton (2011). Religious Women in Golden Age Spain: The Permeable Cloister. By Elizabeth A. Lehfeldt and Public Theater in Golden Age Madrid and Tudor-Stuart London: Class, Gender and Festive Community. By Ivan Cañadas. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (5):863-864.score: 120.0
  4. S. Laing (1983). Review Articles: Advertising and Consumption: Advertising and Social Change by Ronald Berman, Beverley Hills and London: Sage, (Volume 8 The Sage Commtext Series), 1981, Pp 159, 11.95 and 5.50 The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981 (Revised Edition) Pp 248, 1.75 (Paperback) Conspicuous Consumption by Roger S Mason, Farnbrough: Gower, 1981, Pp X + 156, 9.50 Channels of Desire by Stuart Ewen and Elizabeth Ewen, New York and London: McGraw-Hill, 1982, Pp Viii + 312, $7.95 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 1 (3):142-149.score: 120.0
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  5. Elizabeth S. Anderson (1991). John Stuart Mill and Experiments in Living. Ethics 102 (1):4-26.score: 36.0
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  6. Ian Angus, Lenore Langsdorf, S. Atran, Robert M. Baird, Stuart E. Rosembaum, C. Bonelli Munegato, Scott M. Christensen, Dale R. Turner, Bohdan Dziemidok & Peter Engelmann (1993). Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Alcoff, Linda and Potter, Elizabeth (Eds.), Feminist Epistemologies, London, UK, Rout-Ledge, 1993, Pp. 312,£ 35.00,£ 12.99. [REVIEW] Mind 102:406.score: 36.0
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  7. Elizabeth A. S. Dawes (1898). Garnett and Stuart-Glennie's Greek Folk Poesy Greek Folk Poesy : Annotated Translations From the Whole Cycle of Romaic Folkverse and Folk-Prose, by L. M. J. Garnett. Edited with Essays on the Science of Folklore, Greek Folk-Speech, and the Survival of Paganism, by J. S. Stuart-Glennie, M.A. London, David Nutt: 1896. 2 Vols. Demy 8vo. Pp. Xlv. + 541. Nett £1 1s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (05):266-269.score: 36.0
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  8. Elizabeth Telfer (1996). Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to (...)
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  9. Nancy C. Elder & Andrew Schwarzer (1996). Fictional Women Physicians in the Nineteenth Century: The Struggle for Self-Identity. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (3):165-177.score: 30.0
    By the late nineteenth century, there were large numbers of women physicians in the United States. Three Realist novels of the time,Dr. Breen's Practice, by William Dean Howells,Dr. Zay, by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps andA Country Doctor, by Sarah Orne Jewett, feature women doctors as protagonists. The issues in these novels mirrored current issues in medicine and society. By contrasting the lives of these fictional women doctors to their historical counterparts, it is seen that, while the novels are good (...)
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  10. Carlos Montemayor & Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (forthcoming). Review of Space, Time, and Number in the Brain. [REVIEW] Mathematical Intelligencer.score: 24.0
    Albert Einstein once made the following remark about “the world of our sense experiences”: “the fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle.” (1936, p. 351) A few decades later, another physicist, Eugene Wigner, wondered about the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences, concluding his classic article thus: “the miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor deserve” (1960, p. 14). (...)
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  11. Helen Ruth McCabe (2014). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Persuasion. Informal Logic 34 (1):38-61.score: 24.0
    In his youth, John Stuart Mill followed his father’s philosophy of persuasion but, in 1830, Mill adopted a new philosophy of persuasion, trying to lead people incrementally towards the truth from their original stand-points rather than engage them antagonistically. Understanding this change helps us understand apparent contradictions in Mill’s cannon, as he disguises some of his more radical ideas in order to bring his audience to re-assess and authentically change their opinions. It also suggests a way of re-assessing the (...)
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  12. Baruch A. Brody, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, John E. Fellers, Amir Halevy, B. Andrew Lustig, Elizabeth Heitman, Laurence B. McCullough, Gerald McKenny, J. Robert Nelson & Stuart Spicker (1995). For Further Information and/or to Register for the Seminar, Please Write or Call The Institute of Religion, Texas Medical Center, 1129 Wilkins Blvd., Houston, TX 77030.(713) 797-0600. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 7:5.score: 24.0
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  13. Rosario López Sánchez (2013). El principio de nacionalidad en John Stuart Mill: propuestas para un estudio desde la historia contextual. Telos 18 (1-2):63-76.score: 24.0
    The paper offers an interpretation of the role the concept of nationality plays in John Stuart Mill’s thought. To that purpose, I consider not only his best-known writings, but also those less frequently studied in the academic literature on that issue. The argument benefits from Quentin Skinner’s methodological insights into the study of the history of political thought. In that sense, I focus on Mill’s System of Logic textual revisions. In doing so, I briefly examine Mill’s intellectual and personal (...)
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  14. Xaquelina Matesanz Tojeiro (2011). Reseña de "John Stuart Mill: Tres ensayos sobre la religión, editado y traducido por Carlos Mellizo". Telos 18 (1-2):313-318.score: 24.0
    Review of "John Stuart Mill: Tres ensayos sobre la religión (La naturaleza; La utilidad de la religión; El teísmo), editado y traducido por Carlos Mellizo, Madrid, Editorial Tecnos, 2012. ISBN 13: 978-84-309-5502-2".
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  15. Kathleen Blake (2009). Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    This book offers a fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in their bearing for Victorian literature and culture. It treats writings by Jeremy Bentham, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, James and John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Rabindranath Tagore. It sets texts in historical context, examines style as well as ideas, and aims to widen awareness of commonalities across seemingly divided expressions (...)
     
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  16. Baruch A. Brody, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, Elizabeth Heitman, B. Andrew Lustig, Laurence B. McCullough, Gerald McKenny, Stuart F. Spieker & Porter B. Storey (1995). " Recovering the Traditions: Religious Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Christian Bioethics 1 (2):247.score: 24.0
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  17. L. Elizabeth Goldman, Stuart Henderson, Daniel P. Dohan, Jason A. Talavera & R. Adams Dudley (2007). Public Reporting and Pay-for-Performance: Safety-Net Hospital Executives' Concerns and Policy Suggestions. Inquiry 44 (2):137-145.score: 24.0
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  18. Karen E. Tatum (2010). Drawing the Eczema Aesthetic: The Psychological Effects of Chronic Skin Disease as Depicted in the Works of John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):127-153.score: 24.0
    How might the psycho-social effects of chronic skin disease, its treatments (and discontents) be figuratively expressed in writing and painting? Does the art reveal common denominators in experience and representation? If so, how do we understand the cryptic language of these expressions? By examining the works of artists with chronic skin diseases—John Updike, Elizabeth Bishop, and Zelda Fitzgerald—some common features can be noted. Chronically broken skin can fracture the ego or self-perception, resulting in a disturbed body image, which leads (...)
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  19. Colin Heydt, Mill, John Stuart — A. Overview. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  20. Guy Fletcher (2011). Review of Ben Eggleston, Dale Miller & David Weinstein (Eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 21.0
  21. Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.score: 21.0
  22. John Woods (1999). John Stuart Mill (1806--1873). Argumentation 13 (3):317-334.score: 21.0
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  23. John Stuart Mill (1961). The Philosophy of John Stuart Mill: Ethical, Political, and Religious. New York, Modern Library.score: 21.0
    Bentham.--Coleridge.--M. de Tocqueville on democracy in America.--On liberty.--Utilitarianism.--From Considerations on representative government.--From An examination of Sir William Hamilton's philosophy, volume 1.--From Three essays on religion.--John Stuart Mill, a select bibliography (p. [525]-530).
     
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  24. Anne Buchanan & Ellen Buchanan Weiss (2011). Of Sad and Wished-For Years: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Lifelong Illness. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):479-503.score: 18.0
    Victorian poets Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861) and Robert Browning (1812-1889) first fell in love through letters, which they began to write to each other in 1845 (Figures 1 and 2). Their growing relationship, slowly progressing from letter to first encounter and eventual secret marriage in 1846, is documented in two volumes of letters, with a plot that unfolds as warmly and compellingly as the best page-turner invented by a novelist. Both were master wordsmiths, so the beauty of their letters is (...)
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  25. Daniel Jacobson (2008). Utilitarianism Without Consequentialism: The Case of John Stuart Mill. Philosophical Review 117 (2):159-191.score: 18.0
    This essay argues, flouting paradox, that Mill was a utilitarian but not a consequentialist. First, it contends that there is logical space for a view that deserves to be called utilitarian despite its rejection of consequentialism; second, that this logical space is, in fact, occupied by John Stuart Mill. The key to understanding Mill's unorthodox utilitarianism and the role it plays in his moral philosophy is to appreciate his sentimentalist metaethics—especially his account of wrongness in terms of fitting guilt (...)
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  26. G. E. M. Anscombe & Roger Teichmann (eds.) (2000). Logic, Cause & Action: Essays in Honour of Elizabeth Anscombe. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Elizabeth Anscombe is among the most distinguished and original philosophers alive today. Her work has ranged over many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of mind and action, and the philosophy of religion. In each of these areas she has made seminal contributions. The essays in this book reflect the breadth of her interests and the esteem in which she is held by her colleagues. The distinguished contributors include Michael Dunnett, Nancy Cartwright, Peter Geach and Philippa Foot; (...)
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  27. P. M. S. Hacker (2005). Thought and Action: A Tribute to Stuart Hampshire. Philosophy 80 (2):175-197.score: 18.0
    The paper is a tribute to the late Stuart Hampshire's investigations of the ramifying role of intention in our conceptual scheme. It surveys the central argument of Thought and Action and the third chapter of Freedom of the Individual. Emphasis is placed upon Hampshire's constructive account of human agency and consequent description of the manner in which perception and action are interwoven. His analysis of the character of intentional action, self-knowledge and autonomy is described. Various lacunae in Hampshire's account (...)
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  28. Mari Mikkola (2006). Elizabeth Spelman, Gender Realism, and Women. Hypatia 21 (4):77-96.score: 18.0
    : Elizabeth Spelman has famously argued against gender realism (the view that women have some feature in common that makes them women). By and large, feminist philosophers have embraced Spelman's arguments and deemed gender realist positions counterproductive. To the contrary, Mikkola shows that Spelman's arguments do not in actual fact give good reason to reject gender realism in general. She then suggests a way to understand gender realism that does not have the adverse consequences feminist philosophers commonly think gender (...)
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  29. Roger Teichmann (2008). The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    One of the most important philosophers of recent times, Elizabeth Anscombe wrote books and articles on a wide range of topics, including the ground-breaking monograph Intention. Her work is original, challenging, often difficult, always insightful; but it has frequently been misunderstood, and its overall significance is still not fully appreciated. This book is the first major study of Anscombe's philosophical oeuvre. In it, Roger Teichmann presents Anscombe's main ideas, bringing out their interconnections, elaborating and discussing their implications, pointing out (...)
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  30. Lisa Shapiro (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The Union of Soul and Body and the Practice of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (3):503 – 520.score: 18.0
    (1999). Princess Elizabeth and Descartes: The union of soul and body and the practice of philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 503-520. doi: 10.1080/09608789908571042.
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  31. Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez (2009). Utilitarismo y Derechos Humanos: La Propuesta de John Stuart Mill. Plaza y Valdés.score: 18.0
    Se dice que el utilitarismo es incompatible con la defensa de los derechos humanos, pues la búsqueda del mayor bien para el mayor número que prescribe el utilitarismo, puede exigir, en ocasiones, pasar por encima de los derechos. Sin embargo, quizá sea posible ofrecer una solución al conflicto presentando una doctrina utilitarista, reconocible como tal, que sea lo suficientemente amplia como para dar cabida a los derechos. La presente obra tiene como objeto exponer la doctrina de John Stuart Mill (...)
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  32. John Stuart Mill (2006). The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Liberty Fund.score: 18.0
  33. D. Solomon (2008). Elizabeth Anscombe's "Modern Moral Philosophy": Fifty Years Later. Christian Bioethics 14 (2):109-122.score: 18.0
    Extracts This article introduces an issue of Christian bioethics which examines the significance of Elizabeth Anscombe's classic article, “Modern Moral Philosophy”, on the 50th anniversary of its publication. The manifold influences of this article are explored in some detail and the current status of the three famous theses put forward by Anscombe in the article is assessed. This article also briefly introduces the other articles in this issue and loactes them within the general framework of contemporary discussions of Anscombe's (...)
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  34. Daniel M. Hausman (1981). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Economics. Philosophy of Science 48 (3):363-385.score: 18.0
    John Stuart Mill regards economics as an inexact and separate science which employs a deductive method. This paper analyzes and restates Mill's views and considers whether they help one to understand philosophical peculiarities of contemporary microeconomic theory. The author concludes that it is philosophically enlightening to interpret microeconomics as an inexact and separate science, but that Mill's notion of a deductive method has only a little to contribute.
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  35. David Hodgson (2008). The Knowledge Argument: A Response to Elizabeth Schier. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):112-115.score: 18.0
    I much appreciated Elizabeth Schier's paper on Frank Jackson's knowledge argument, published in the January 2008 issue of Journal of Consciousness Studies (Schier, 2008) -- in part, I confess, because of resonances with my gestalt argument for free will (Hodgson, 2001; 2002; 2005; 2007a,b). I would like to offer two comments on this paper.
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  36. Ralph Wedgwood (2012). Review: Elizabeth Brake, Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Elizabeth Brake's book Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).
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  37. Joseph Long (2014). In Defence of Cornell Realism: A Reply to Elizabeth Tropman. Theoria 80 (2):174-183.score: 18.0
    Cornell realists claim, among other things, that moral knowledge can be acquired in the same basic way that scientific knowledge is acquired. Recently in this journal Elizabeth Tropman has presented two arguments against this claim. In the present article, I attempt to show that the first argument attacks a straw man and the second mischaracterizes the Cornell realists' epistemology and ends up begging the question. I close by suggesting that, given Tropman's own apparent views, her objections are also probably (...)
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  38. Elijah Millgram (2009). John Stuart Mill, Determinism, and the Problem of Induction. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):183-199.score: 18.0
    Auguste Comte's doctrine of the three phases through which sciences pass (the theological, the metaphysical, and the positive) allows us to explain what John Stuart Mill was attempting in his magnum opus, the System of Logic: namely, to move the science of logic to its terminal and 'positive' stage. Both Mill's startling account of deduction and his unremarked solution to the Humean problem of induction eliminate the notions of necessity or force—in this case, the 'logical must'—characteristic of a science's (...)
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  39. Raphael Cohen-Almagor, John Stuart Mill.score: 18.0
    John Stuart Mill's concept of ethics was closely related to his firm belief in freedom. He was strictly a believer in each person bringing the greatest degree of happiness or good to the greatest number. This would be an individual act and in no way a forced action. One is free to act without coercion as long as no harm is brought to another person. Consequences must be considered carefully before acting and the act chosen must be the best (...)
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  40. Efraim Podoksik (2009). Commentary on Elizabeth Corey's Interpretation of Michael Oakeshott. Zygon 44 (1):223-226.score: 18.0
    Elizabeth Corey suggests that in order to understand Michael Oakeshott's worldview one should pay special attention to two subjects, religion and aesthetics, and analyze the connection between these two realms and the idea of practical life in general and of politics in particular. Her book provides a sympathetic but also critical conversation with Oakeshott's ideas, ultimately offering us a coherent picture of the place of the religious, poetical, and political in the totality of his thought. Corey persuasively shows that (...)
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  41. John Stuart Mill, The Autobiography of John Stuart Mill.score: 18.0
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  42. Tanya Collings (2011). Frankenstein and Feminism: Contemplating The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):66-68.score: 18.0
    Theodore Roszak's compelling parable, The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, provides an (eco)-feminist view of the “Night of the Living Dead Model” and suggests that only the equal union of “masculine” and “feminine” energies will help us resolve the current eco-crisis. This article further explores the consequences of the highly masculinized post-Enlightenment rationalism as demonstrated in Roszak's novel. Although this article agrees that there is a dangerous imbalance between natural/spiritual and scientific/rational viewpoints, it also stresses that the extreme genderification of (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Loftus, Elizabeth F. Loftus & William H. Calvin , "Memory's Future,".score: 18.0
    Psychology's fascination with memory and its imperfections dates back further than we can remember. The first careful experimental studies of memory were published in 1885 by German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus, and tens of thousands of memory studies have been conducted since. What has been learned, and what might the future of memory be?
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  44. Stephen Nathanson (2005). John Stuart Mill on the Ownership and Use of Land. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):10-16.score: 18.0
    My aim in this paper is to describe some of John Stuart Mill’s views about property rights in land and some implications he drew for public policy. While Mill defends private ownership of land, he emphasizes the ways in which ownership of land is an anomaly that does not fit neatly into the usual views about private ownership. While most of MiII’s discussion assumes the importance of maximizing the productivity of land, he anticipates contemporary environmentalists by also expressing concerns (...)
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  45. S. H. Vollmer (2003). The Philosophy of Chemistry Reformulating Itself: Nalni Bhushan and Stuart Rosenfeld's of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):383-390.score: 18.0
    Philosophers of chemistry, following the lead of physicists, have been slow to realize that molecular descriptions issuing from quantum mechanics in the absence of chemical theory are fatally flawed. In the wake of this realization, new topics have begun to unfoldincluding new metaphysical issues, new concerns about the philosophy of chemistry's place in the philosophy of science, and new accounts of how properties are observed, inferred, and presented. A recent collection of essays, Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on (...)
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  46. Stephen Jay Gould, "The Pattern of Life's History" Stuart Kauffman: Steve is Extremely Bright, Inventive. He Thoroughly Understands Paleontology; He Thoroughly Understands Evolutionary Biology. He Has.. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Stuart Kauffman: Steve is extremely bright, inventive. He thoroughly understands paleontology; he thoroughly understands evolutionary biology. He has performed an enormous service in getting people to think about punctuated equilibrium, because you see the process of stasis/sudden change, which is a puzzle. It's the cessation of change for long periods of time. Since you always have mutations, why don't things continue changing? You either have to say that the particular form is highly adapted, optimal, and exists in a stable (...)
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  47. Sean Donaghue Johnston (2011). John Stuart Mill on Health Care Reform. Social Philosophy Today 27:63-74.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I explore John Stuart Mill’s theory of government and its application to the issue of health care reform. In particular, I ask whether Mill’s theory of government would justify or condemn the creation of a public health-insurance option. Although Mill’s deep distrust of governmental authority would seem to align him with Republicans, Tea Partiers, libertarians, and others, who cast the public option as a “government takeover” of “our” health care system, I argue that Mill offers good (...)
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  48. John V. Strong (1978). John Stuart Mill, John Herschel, and the 'Probability of Causes'. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:31 - 41.score: 18.0
    While historians of scientific method have recently called attention to the views of many of John Stuart Mill's contemporaries on the relation between probability and inductive inference, little if any note has been taken of Mill's own vigorous attack on the received "Laplacean" interpretation of probability in the first (1843) edition of the System of Logic. This paper examines the place of Mill's critique, both in the overall framework of his philosophy, and in the tradition of assessing the (...)
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  49. Ben Eggleston, Dale E. Miller & D. Weinstein (eds.) (2011). John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The 'Art of Life' is John Stuart Mill's name for his account of practical reason. In this volume, eleven leading scholars elucidate this fundamental, but widely neglected, element of Mill's thought. Mill divides the Art of Life into three 'departments': 'Morality, Prudence or Policy, and Æsthetics'. In the volume's first section, Rex Martin, David Weinstein, Ben Eggleston, and Dale E. Miller investigate the relation between the departments of morality and prudence. Their papers ask whether Mill is a rule utilitarian (...)
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  50. Henrika Kuklick (2011). Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia. Minerva 49 (3):355-358.score: 18.0
    Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 355-358 DOI 10.1007/s11024-011-9173-3 Authors Henrika Kuklick, History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania, 303 Cohen Hall, 249 South 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6304, USA Journal Minerva Online ISSN 1573-1871 Print ISSN 0026-4695 Journal Volume Volume 49 Journal Issue Volume 49, Number 3.
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