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  1. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2012). New Essays in Political and Social Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume represents a contribution to the investigation of these issues of perennial interest and import, featuring essays whose authors hope to extend, deepen, and, in some cases, move in new directions, the current state of discussion.
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  2. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2012). Natural Rights Individualism and Progressivism in American Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    "In 1776, the American Declaration of Independence appealed to "the Laws of nature and of Nature's God" and affirmed "these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain ...
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  3. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2010). Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press.
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  4. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2010). What Should Constitutions Do? Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume--written by prominent philosophers, political scientists, and legal scholars--address these questions and explore related issues.
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  5. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2009). Utilitarianism: The Aggregation Question. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  6. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2008). Objectivism, Subjectivism, and Relativism in Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Some essays in this book consider whether objective moral truths can be grounded in an understanding of the nature of human beings as rational and social ...
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  7. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2006). Justice and Global Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Since the end of the Cold War, there has been increasing interest in the global dimensions of a host of public policy issues - issues involving war and peace, terrorism, international law, regulation of commerce, environmental protection, and disparities of wealth, income, and access to medical care. Especially pressing is the question of whether it is possible to formulate principles of justice that are valid not merely within a single society but across national borders. The thirteen essays in this volume (...)
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  8. Ellen Frankel Paul (2005). Rights and Reason. Review of Metaphysics 58 (4):896-898.
  9. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2005). Natural Rights Liberalism From Locke to Nozick. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays is dedicated to the memory of the late Harvard philosopher Robert Nozick, who died in 2002. The publication of Nozick's Anarchy, State, and Utopia in 1974 revived serious interest in natural rights liberalism, which, beginning in the latter half of the eighteenth century, had been eclipsed by a succession of antithetical political theories including utilitarianism, progressivism, and various egalitarian and collectivist ideologies. Some of our contributors critique Nozick's political philosophy. Other contributors examine earlier figures in the (...)
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  10. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2005). Personal Identity. Cambridge University Press.
    What is a person? What makes me the same person today that I was yesterday or will be tomorrow? Philosophers have long pondered these questions. In Plato's Symposium, Socrates observed that all of us are constantly undergoing change: we experience physical changes to our bodies, as well as changes in our 'manners, customs, opinions, desires, pleasures, pains, [and] fears'. Aristotle theorized that there must be some underlying 'substratum' that remains the same even as we undergo these changes. John Locke rejected (...)
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  11. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2004). Morality and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Divisions abound as to whether politics should be held responsible to a higher moral standard or whether pragmatic considerations, or realpolitik, should prevail. The two poles are represented most conspicuously by Aristotle (for whom the proper aim of politics is moral virtue) and Machiavelli (whose prince exalted political pragmatism over morality). The fourteen contributions to this volume address perennial concerns in political and moral theory. They underscore the rekindled yearning of many to hold the political realm to a higher standard (...)
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  12. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2003). Autonomy. Cambridge University Press.
    A central idea in moral and political philosophy, 'autonomy' is generally understood as some form of self-governance or self-direction. Certain Stoics, modern philosophers such as Spinoza, and most importantly, Immanuel Kant, are among the great philosophers who have offered important insights on the concept. Some theorists analyze autonomy in terms of the self being moved by its higher-order desires. Others argue that autonomy must be understood in terms of acting from reason or from a sense of moral duty independent of (...)
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  13. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2002). Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Technological innovations and social developments have led to dramatic changes in the practice of medicine and in the way that scientists conduct medical research. Change has brought beneficial consequences, yet these gains have come at a cost, for many modern medical practices raise troubling ethical questions: Should life be sustained mechanically when the brain's functions have ceased? Should potential parents be permitted to manipulate the genetic characteristics of their embryos? Should society ration medical care to control costs? Should fetal stem (...)
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  14. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2001). Moral Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers since ancient times have pondered how we can know whether moral claims are true or false. The first half of the twentieth century witnessed widespread skepticism concerning the possibility of moral knowledge. Indeed, some argued that moral statements lacked cognitive content altogether, because they were not susceptible to empirical verification. The British philosopher A. J. Ayer contends that 'They are pure expressions of feeling and as such do not come under the category of truth and falsehood. They are unverifiable (...)
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  15. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1999). Human Flourishing. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume examine the nature of human flourishing and its relationship to a variety of other key concepts in moral theory. Some of them trace the link between flourishing and human nature, asking whether a theory of human nature can allow us to develop an objective list of goods that are of value to all agents, regardless of their individual purposes or aims. Some essays look at the role of friendships or parent-child relationships in a good life, (...)
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  16. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1999). Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume address questions about responsibility that arise in moral philosophy and legal theory. Some analyse different theories of causality, asking which theory offers the best account of human agency and the most satisfactory resolution of troubling controversies about free will and determinism. Some essays look at responsibility in the legal realm, seeking to determine how the law should assign liability for negligence, or whether the courts should allow defendants to offer excuses for their wrongdoing or to (...)
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  17. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Political and Social Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    These essays represent the latest research of a number of prominent political theorists. The essays explore the role of government, the nature of public discourse and the obligations of citizens. Some examine the sources of our need for government, asking what form of government we should establish and whether a single form can be suitable for all societies. Some seek to discover the proper aims of government - asking, for example, whether government should promote equality among its citizens or whether (...)
     
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  18. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1995). The Just Society. Cambridge University Press.
    The twelve essays in this collection address questions about justice and social institutions designed to secure it. Some explore the relationship between justice and equality, asking whether societies should strive to eliminate inequalities in their citizens' levels of opportunity or welfare. Some consider whether societies are obligated to provide their less fortunate citizens with some minimum level of subsistence, or whether the provision of such relief is best left to private charitable organisations. Some essays look at the relationship between justice (...)
     
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  19. Ellen Frankel Paul (1992). Fetal Protection and Freedom of Contract. Public Affairs Quarterly 6 (3):305-326.
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  20. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1992). The Good Life and the Human Good. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the good life? This question captured the attention of ancient philosophers and it remains with us today, because it compels us to consider what it is to be human. To inquire about the good life is to ask, not about the proper conduct in one specific situation, but about the proper course of an entire life. It is to ask what we ought to make of ourselves as moral beings, what standards we ought to follow, and what goals (...)
     
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  21. Ellen Frankel Paul (1988). Business Abroad. In Tibor R. Machan (ed.), Commerce and Morality. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  22. Ellen Frankel Paul (ed.) (1988). The New Social Contract: Essays on Gauthier. B. Blackwell for the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, Bowling Green State University.
     
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  23. Jules L. Coleman & Ellen Frankel Paul (eds.) (1987). Philosophy and Law. B. Blackwell for the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, Bowling Green State University.
     
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  24. Ellen Frankel Paul (1983). On Three. The Monist 66 (4):529-544.
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  25. Ellen Frankel Paul (1983). On Three "Inherent" Powers of Government. The Monist 66 (4):529-544.
  26. Ellen Frankel Paul (1981). The Just Takings Issue. Environmental Ethics 3 (4):309-328.
    Courts and legal commentators have been notoriously unsuccessful in articulating a rule to differentiate between uncompensated police power regulations of land by govemment and situations in which the govemment can only interfere with property rights if it provides compensation to those owners who suffer losses. Noticeably absent from most discussions of this “takings” issue is any foundational underpinning in a theory of justice with respect to property holdings. Can two of the most influential contemporary theories ofjustice-that of John Rawls and (...)
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  27. Ellen Frankel Paul (1978). J. S. Mill: The Utilitarian Influence in the Demise of Laissez-Faire. Journal of Libertarian Studies 2 (2).
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