Search results for 'Elletta Sangrey Callahan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elletta Sangrey Callahan & John W. Collins (1992). Employee Attitudes Toward Whistleblowing: Management and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):939 - 948.
    Managers of organizations should be aware of the attitudes of employees concerning whistleblowing. Employee views should affect how employers choose to respond to whistleblowers through the evolving law of wrongful discharge.This article reports on a survey of employee attitudes toward the legal protection of whistleblowers and presents an analysis of the results of that survey.
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  2.  1
    Gisela M. Von Dran, Elletta Sangrey Callahan & Heather Victoria Taylor (2001). Can Students' Academic Integrity Be Improved? Attitudes and Behaviors Before and After Implementation of an Academic Integrity Policy. Teaching Business Ethics 5 (1):35-58.
  3.  8
    Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2004). Gisela M. Von Dran, Elletta Sangrey Callahan and Heather Victoria Taylor/Can Students' Academic Integrity Be Improved? Atti-Tudes and Behaviors Before and After Implementation of an Academic Integrity Policy 35–58. [REVIEW] Business Ethics 89:106.
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  4. John Leonard Callahan (1927). A Theory of Esthetic According to the Principles of St. Thomas Aquinas ... By Leonard Callahan. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America.
     
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  5. Daniel Callahan (2011). Daniel Callahan Replies. Hastings Center Report 41 (6):6.
     
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  6. Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan & Frances Kissling (forthcoming). In Conversation: Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan, and Frances Kissling Discuss the Marlise Munoz Case, Advance Directives, and Pregnant Women. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (1).
    Feminist bioethicists of a variety of persuasions discuss the 2013 case of Marlise Munoz, a pregnant woman whose medical care was in dispute after she became brain dead.
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  7. Joan Callahan (2009). Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters—At Least for Now. Hypatia 24 (1):70 - 80.
    This paper addresses the progressive, feminist critique of same-sex marriage as articulated by Claudia Card. Although agreeing with Card that the institution of marriage as we know it is profoundly morally flawed in its origins and effects, Callahan disagrees with Card's suggestion that queer activists in the United States should not be working for the inclusion of same-sex couples in the institution.
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  8. Daniel Callahan & Norman Daniels (1989). Setting Limits: Medical Goals in an Aging Society. Ethics 100 (1):169-176.
    In Setting Limits, Daniel Callahan advances the provocative thesis that age be a limiting factor in decisions to allocate certain kinds of health services to the elderly. However, when one looks at available data, one discovers that there are many more elderly women than there are elderly men, and these older women are poorer, more apt to live alone, and less likely to have informal social and personal supports than their male counterparts. Older women, therefore, will make the heaviest (...)
     
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  9.  18
    Daniel Callahan (2006). Medicine and the Market: Equity V. Choice. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Much has been written about medicine and the market in recent years. This book is the first to include an assessment of market influence in both developed and developing countries, and among the very few that have tried to evaluate the actual health and economic impact of market theory and practices in a wide range of national settings. Tracing the path that market practices have taken from Adam Smith in the eighteenth century into twenty-first-century health care, Daniel Callahan and (...)
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  10.  16
    Daniel Callahan (1999). The Hastings Center and the Early Years of Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (1):53-71.
    The Hastings Center was founded in 1969 to study ethical problems in medicine and biology. The Center arose from a confluence of three social currents: the increased public scrutiny of medicine and its practices, the concern about the moral problems being generated by technological developments, and the desire of one of its founders (Callahan) to make use of his philosophical training in a more applied way. The early years of the Center were devoted to raising money, developing an early (...)
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  11. Raymond E. Callahan (1964). Education and the Cult of Efficiency. University of Chicago Press.
    Raymond Callahan's lively study exposes the alarming lengths to which school administrators went, particularly in the period from 1910 to 1930, in sacrificing educational goals to the demands of business procedures.
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  12.  4
    Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive issues of (...)
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  13. Daniel Callahan (2006). Medicine and the Market: Equity V. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Much has been written about medicine and the market in recent years. This book is the first to include an assessment of market influence in both developed and developing countries, and among the very few that have tried to evaluate the actual health and economic impact of market theory and practices in a wide range of national settings. Tracing the path that market practices have taken from Adam Smith in the eighteenth century into twenty-first-century health care, Daniel Callahan and (...)
     
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  14. Anita L. Allen, Stephen Bates, Mark A. Bedau, Jessica Berg, Nicole Deming, Ryan Blum, Benjamin Boltin, Nancy Berlinger, Harold Braswell & Daniel Callahan (2011). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 41 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2011. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 41 (2011) and May Be Purchased From Wiley-Blackwell; E-Mail: Cs-Journals@ Wiley. Com. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 41.
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  15.  24
    Laura Frances Callahan (2016). On the Problem of Paradise. Faith and Philosophy 33 (2):129-141.
    Benton, Hawthorne, and Isaacs (BHI) claim that evil must be evidence against God’s existence, because the absence of evil would be (presumably excellent) evidence for it. Their argument is obviously valid on standard Bayesian epistemology. But in addition to raising a few reasons one might doubt its premise, I here highlight the rather misleading meaning, in BHI’s argument, of evil’s being evidence against God. BHI seek to establish that if one learned simply “that there was evil,” perhaps via an oracle, (...)
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  16. Laura Frances Callahan & Timothy O'Connor (eds.) (2014). Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    Is religious faith consistent with being an intellectually virtuous thinker? In seeking to answer this question, one quickly finds others, each of which has been the focus of recent renewed attention by epistemologists: What is it to be an intellectually virtuous thinker? Must all reasonable belief be grounded in public evidence? Under what circumstances is a person rationally justified in believing something on trust, on the testimony of another, or because of the conclusions drawn by an intellectual authority? Can it (...)
     
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  17.  5
    A. Acevedo, E. H. Y. Boo, J. Brinkmann, E. S. Callahan, B. Castro, L. Chalip, P. M. Clikeman, L. Dickie, J. Down & D. D. DuFrene (2001). Index of Authors Volume 5, 2001. Teaching Business Ethics 5 (485).
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  18. Daniel Callahan (2003). Individual Good and Common Good: A Communitarian Approach to Bioethics. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (4):496-507.
  19.  4
    Sandra Lee Bartky, Daniel Callahan, Joan C. Callahan, Peggy DesAutels, Robin Fiore, Frida Kerner Furman, Martha Holstein, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, James Lindemann Nelson, Sara Ruddick, Anita Silvers, Joan Tronto, Margaret Urban Walker & Susan Wendell (eds.) (2000). Mother Time: Women, Aging, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Fifteen original essays open up a novel area of inquiry: the distinctively ethical dimensions of women's experiences of and in aging. Contributors distinguished in the fields of feminist ethics and the ethics of aging explore assumptions, experiences, practices, and public policies that affect women's well-being and dignity in later life. The book brings to the study of women's aging a reflective dimension missing from the empirical work that has predominated to date. Ethical studies of aging have so far failed to (...)
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  20.  43
    Daniel Callahan (2012). Must We Ration Health Care for the Elderly? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (1):10-16.
    Resistance to rationing health care to the elderly is enormous. This article lays out the need for rationing, based on projections of Medicare expenditure in the near future, and the judgment of policy experts that there will be no technological breakthrough that might lower costs. Various forms of rationing possibilities are discussed as well as cultural and political obstacles to needed reform. Some general principles for thinking about health care for the elderly are presented.
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  21. Joan Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction to Writing Against Heterosexism. Hypatia 22 (1).
  22. Daniel Callahan (1990). What Kind of Life the Limits of Medical Progress.
     
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  23. Hilary Callahan, Massimo Pigliucci & Carl Schlichting (1997). Developmental Phenotypic Plasticity: Where Ecology and Evolution Meet Molecular Biology. Bioessays 19 (6):519-525.
    An exploration of the nexus between ecology, evolutionary biology and molecular biology, via the concept of phenotypic plasticity.
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  24.  53
    Sidney Callahan (2003). New Challenges of Globalization for Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (1):3 – 15.
    Recent events demonstrated to the world a growing sense of interconnection and interdependence that will call for universal values and ethical behaviors on the part of journalists. In this article I look at journalism, likening this profession of inquiry to that of scientists, and I look at journalism ethics as a body of knowledge before identifying universal characteristics and suggesting that because of the many universal values that bond humans at whatever location, journalists should be able to agree on common (...)
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  25.  6
    Daniel Callahan (2016). Invisible Chains and Unwitting Captivity: American Health Care. Hastings Center Report 46 (2):44-45.
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  26. Daniel Callahan (1992). When Self‐Detertnination Runs Amok. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):52-55.
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  27.  22
    D. Callahan (2003). Principlism and Communitarianism. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (5):287-291.
    The decline in the interest in ethical theory is first outlined, as a background to the author’s discussion of principlism. The author’s own stance, that of a communitarian philosopher, is then described, before the subject of principlism itself is addressed. Two problems stand in the way of the author’s embracing principlism: its individualistic bias and its capacity to block substantive ethical inquiry. The more serious problem the author finds to be its blocking function. Discussing the four scenarios the author finds (...)
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  28.  1
    Daniel Callahan (2001). Doing Good and Doing Well. Hastings Center Report 31 (2):19-21.
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  29.  6
    Daniel Callahan (2013). Obesity: Chasing an Elusive Epidemic. Hastings Center Report 43 (1):34-40.
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  30. Mark J. Hanson & Daniel Callahan (1999). The Goals of Medicine the Forgotten Issue in Health Care Reform. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31.  5
    Daniel Callahan (1991). Medical Futility, Medical Necessity: The‐Problem‐Without‐A‐Name. Hastings Center Report 21 (4):30-35.
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  32.  83
    Joan C. Callahan (1985). Response to Rebecca Dresser's 'Involuntary Confinement: Legal and Psychiatric Perspectives'. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (2):199-202.
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  33.  38
    Joan C. Callahan (1987). On Harming the Dead. Ethics 97 (2):341-352.
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  34.  31
    Daniel Callahan (2011). Rationing: Theory, Politics, and Passions. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):23-27.
    A confession is in order. As did almost everyone else of a certain persuasion, I recoiled when Sarah Palin invoked the notion of a "death panel" to characterize reform efforts to improve end-of-life counseling. That was wrong and unfair. But I was left uneasy by her phrase. Had I not been one of a handful of bioethicists over the years who had pushed to bring the need for rationing of health care to public attention and proposed ways to carry it (...)
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  35. Daniel Callahan (2008). Organized Obfuscation: Advocacy for Physician-Assisted Suicide. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 30-33.
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  36.  8
    Daniel Callahan (1990). Religion and the Secularization of Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 20 (4):2-4.
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  37. Joan C. Callahan (ed.) (1988). Ethical Issues in Professional Life. Oxford University Press.
    When (if ever) may a professional deceive a client for the client's own good? Under what conditions (if any) is whistle-blowing morally required? These are just some of the questions that scholars as diverse as Michael D. Bayles, Thomas Nagel, Sissela Bok, Jessica Mitford, and Peter A. French confront in this stimulating anthology. Organized around philosophical issues such as the moral foundations of professional ethics, models of the professional-client relationship, deception, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, professional dissent, and professional virtue, (...)
     
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  38. Daniel Callahan & Laura M. Purdy (1995). The Troubled Dream of Life: Living with Mortality. Bioethics 9 (2):175-178.
     
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  39.  2
    Daniel Callahan (1994). Bioethics: Private Choice and Common Good. Hastings Center Report 24 (3):28-31.
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  40.  6
    Daniel Callahan (1984). Autonomy: A Moral Good, Not a Moral Obsession. Hastings Center Report 14 (5):40-42.
  41.  15
    D. Callahan (1993). Response to Roger W. Hunt. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):24-27.
    A response to a critique by Roger W. Hunt of my views on the eventual likely need to use age as a standard for the allocation of expensive, high-technology, life-extending medical care for the elderly. The response encompasses three elements: 1. that while the elderly have a substantial claim to publicly-provided health care, it cannot be an unlimited claim; 2. that a health care system which provided a decent, coherent set of medical and social services for the elderly would be (...)
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  42.  2
    Daniel Callahan (1995). The Puzzle of Profound Respect. Hastings Center Report 25 (1):39-40.
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  43.  4
    Barbara C. Thornton, Daniel Callahan & James Lindemann Nelson (1993). Bioethics Education. Hastings Center Report 23 (1):25-29.
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  44.  2
    Daniel Callahan (1993). Caring and Curing: A Medicare Proposal. Hastings Center Report 23 (3):18-19.
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  45.  37
    Daniel Callahan (1997). Cloning: The Work Not Done. Hastings Center Report 27 (5):18-20.
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  46.  14
    Sidney Callahan (1988). The Role of Emotion in Ethical Decisionmaking. Hastings Center Report 18 (3):9-14.
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  47.  12
    A. A. Eduard Verhagen, Pieter J. Sauer, Daniel Callahan, Frank A. Chervenak, Laurence B. McCullough, Birgit Arabin, Tim Smith & Georgia Goldfarb (2008). "Are Their Babies Different From Ours?": Dutch Culture and the Groningen Protocol. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):4-7.
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  48.  15
    Sidney Callahan (2008). Comment on Confucian Family Love From a Christian Perspective. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):145-149.
  49.  13
    Daniel Callahan (2000). Judging the Future: Whose Fault Will It Be? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):677 – 687.
    This paper looks at the future from the perspective of the way in which present thinking can influence what the future might be. It assumes that history shapes the future and that the present generation is in a position to shape it. It looks at the future of medicine as a science and a professional discipline, of health care as policy and politics, of culture and ideology as forces shaping medicine and health care, and of biomedical ethics as an influential (...)
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  50.  34
    Gene Callahan & Robert P. Murphy (2006). Hans-Herman Hoppe's Argumentation Ethic: A Critique. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (2):53-64.
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