Search results for 'Elletta Sangrey Callahan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elletta Sangrey Callahan & John W. Collins (1992). Employee Attitudes Toward Whistleblowing: Management and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):939 - 948.score: 870.0
    Managers of organizations should be aware of the attitudes of employees concerning whistleblowing. Employee views should affect how employers choose to respond to whistleblowers through the evolving law of wrongful discharge.This article reports on a survey of employee attitudes toward the legal protection of whistleblowers and presents an analysis of the results of that survey.
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  2. Gisela M. Von Dran, Elletta Sangrey Callahan & Heather Victoria Taylor (2001). Can Students' Academic Integrity Be Improved? Attitudes and Behaviors Before and After Implementation of an Academic Integrity Policy. Teaching Business Ethics 5 (1):35-58.score: 870.0
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  3. Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2004). Gisela M. Von Dran, Elletta Sangrey Callahan and Heather Victoria Taylor/Can Students' Academic Integrity Be Improved? Atti-Tudes and Behaviors Before and After Implementation of an Academic Integrity Policy 35–58. [REVIEW] Business Ethics 89:106.score: 270.0
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  4. John Leonard Callahan (1927). A Theory of Esthetic According to the Principles of St. Thomas Aquinas ... By Leonard Callahan. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America.score: 120.0
     
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  5. Daniel Callahan (2011). Daniel Callahan Replies. Hastings Center Report 41 (6):6.score: 120.0
     
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  6. Daniel Callahan (2006). Medicine and the Market: Equity V. Choice. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 60.0
    Much has been written about medicine and the market in recent years. This book is the first to include an assessment of market influence in both developed and developing countries, and among the very few that have tried to evaluate the actual health and economic impact of market theory and practices in a wide range of national settings. Tracing the path that market practices have taken from Adam Smith in the eighteenth century into twenty-first-century health care, Daniel Callahan and (...)
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  7. Joan Callahan (2009). Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters—At Least for Now. Hypatia 24 (1):70 - 80.score: 60.0
    This paper addresses the progressive, feminist critique of same-sex marriage as articulated by Claudia Card. Although agreeing with Card that the institution of marriage as we know it is profoundly morally flawed in its origins and effects, Callahan disagrees with Card's suggestion that queer activists in the United States should not be working for the inclusion of same-sex couples in the institution.
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  8. Daniel Callahan (1999). The Hastings Center and the Early Years of Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (1):53-71.score: 60.0
    The Hastings Center was founded in 1969 to study ethical problems in medicine and biology. The Center arose from a confluence of three social currents: the increased public scrutiny of medicine and its practices, the concern about the moral problems being generated by technological developments, and the desire of one of its founders (Callahan) to make use of his philosophical training in a more applied way. The early years of the Center were devoted to raising money, developing an early (...)
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  9. Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.score: 60.0
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive issues of (...)
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  10. Daniel Callahan (2006). Medicine and the Market: Equity V. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 60.0
    Much has been written about medicine and the market in recent years. This book is the first to include an assessment of market influence in both developed and developing countries, and among the very few that have tried to evaluate the actual health and economic impact of market theory and practices in a wide range of national settings. Tracing the path that market practices have taken from Adam Smith in the eighteenth century into twenty-first-century health care, Daniel Callahan and (...)
     
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  11. Daniel Callahan (1992). When Self‐Detertnination Runs Amok. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):52-55.score: 30.0
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  12. Daniel Callahan (2008). Organized Obfuscation: Advocacy for Physician-Assisted Suicide. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 30-33.score: 30.0
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  13. Hilary Callahan, Massimo Pigliucci & Carl Schlichting (1997). Developmental Phenotypic Plasticity: Where Ecology and Evolution Meet Molecular Biology. BioEssays 19 (6):519-525.score: 30.0
    An exploration of the nexus between ecology, evolutionary biology and molecular biology, via the concept of phenotypic plasticity.
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  14. Sidney Callahan (2003). New Challenges of Globalization for Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (1):3 – 15.score: 30.0
    Recent events demonstrated to the world a growing sense of interconnection and interdependence that will call for universal values and ethical behaviors on the part of journalists. In this article I look at journalism, likening this profession of inquiry to that of scientists, and I look at journalism ethics as a body of knowledge before identifying universal characteristics and suggesting that because of the many universal values that bond humans at whatever location, journalists should be able to agree on common (...)
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  15. Daniel Callahan (2012). Must We Ration Health Care for the Elderly? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):10-16.score: 30.0
    Resistance to rationing health care to the elderly is enormous. This article lays out the need for rationing, based on projections of Medicare expenditure in the near future, and the judgment of policy experts that there will be no technological breakthrough that might lower costs. Various forms of rationing possibilities are discussed as well as cultural and political obstacles to needed reform. Some general principles for thinking about health care for the elderly are presented.
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  16. Daniel Callahan (2011). Rationing: Theory, Politics, and Passions. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):23-27.score: 30.0
    A confession is in order. As did almost everyone else of a certain persuasion, I recoiled when Sarah Palin invoked the notion of a "death panel" to characterize reform efforts to improve end-of-life counseling. That was wrong and unfair. But I was left uneasy by her phrase. Had I not been one of a handful of bioethicists over the years who had pushed to bring the need for rationing of health care to public attention and proposed ways to carry it (...)
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  17. Daniel Callahan (2011). End-of-Life Care: A Philosophical or Management Problem? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):114-120.score: 30.0
    End-of-life care became an important issue in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was in great part driven by complaints about the care of the dying: lack of patient autonomy, indifferent or insensitive physicians, and inadequate pain control. The main task of those who worked to improve the situation centered on changing each of those variables, assuming that would do the job. But it has worked to a moderate extent only and the problem is not fully solved. The main (...)
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  18. Daniel Callahan (2009). Ethics and Population. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):11-13.score: 30.0
  19. Joan C. Callahan (1987). On Harming the Dead. Ethics 97 (2):341-352.score: 30.0
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  20. Daniel Callahan (2003). Individual Good and Common Good: A Communitarian Approach to Bioethics. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (4):496-507.score: 30.0
  21. Daniel Callahan (1998). Cloning: Then and Now. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):141-144.score: 30.0
    The possibility of human cloning first surfaced in the 1960s, stimulated by the report that a salamander had been cloned. James D. Watson and Joshua Lederberg, distinguished Nobel laureates, speculated that the cloning of human beings might one day be within reach; it was only a matter of time. Bioethics was still at that point in its infancybioethicsand cloning immediately caught the eye of a number of those beginning to write in the field. They included Paul Ramsey, Hans Jonas, and (...)
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  22. Daniel Callahan (2005). Death: "The Distinguished Thing". Hastings Center Report 35 (6 Supplement):sr5-s8.score: 30.0
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  23. Daniel Callahan (2001). Health Care for Children: A Community Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):137 – 146.score: 30.0
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  24. D. Callahan (2003). Principlism and Communitarianism. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (5):287-291.score: 30.0
  25. Daniel Callahan (2008). Death, Mourning, and Medical Progress. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (1):103-115.score: 30.0
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  26. Joan Callahan (1996). Symposium: A Roundtable on Feminism and Philosophy in the Mid-1990s: Taking Stock: Introduction. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):184-188.score: 30.0
  27. Joan C. Callahan (1986). Academic Paternalism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):21-31.score: 30.0
  28. Daniel Callahan (2006). Bioethics and Ideology. Hastings Center Report 36 (1):3-3.score: 30.0
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  29. Daniel Callahan (2000). Judging the Future: Whose Fault Will It Be? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):677 – 687.score: 30.0
    This paper looks at the future from the perspective of the way in which present thinking can influence what the future might be. It assumes that history shapes the future and that the present generation is in a position to shape it. It looks at the future of medicine as a science and a professional discipline, of health care as policy and politics, of culture and ideology as forces shaping medicine and health care, and of biomedical ethics as an influential (...)
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  30. Gene Callahan (2013). Liberty Versus Libertarianism. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (1):48-67.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to persuade its reader that libertarianism, at least in several of its varieties, is a species of the genus Michael Oakeshott referred to as ‘rationalism in politics’. I hope to demonstrate, employing the work of Oakeshott, as well as Aristotle and Onora O’Neill, how many libertarian theorists, who generally have a sincere and admirable commitment to personal liberty, have been led astray by the rationalist promise that we might be able to approach deductive certainty concerning the 'correctness' (...)
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  31. Hilde Lindemann Nelson & Daniel Callahan (2005). Before He Wakes. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):15-16.score: 30.0
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  32. Daniel Callahan (2006). Longer Lives-Whose Good? Dialogue 45 (3):567-575.score: 30.0
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  33. Joan C. Callahan (1986). Paternalism and Voluntariness. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):199 - 219.score: 30.0
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  34. Sidney Callahan (2008). Comment on Confucian Family Love From a Christian Perspective. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):145-149.score: 30.0
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  35. Joan C. Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction To. Hypatia 22 (1).score: 30.0
  36. Daniel Callahan (1999). Medicine and the Market: A Research Agenda. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (3):224 – 242.score: 30.0
    One of the most important developments in international medicine over the past two decades has been a turn to the market as a way of coping with rising costs and responding to calls for more freedom from government control. A full moral evaluation of the relationship of medicine and the market requires asking a wide range of questions bearing on the meaning and impact of market strategies on the economics of health care and on the clinical and public health outcomes (...)
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  37. Joan C. Callahan (1984). Liberty, Beneficence, and Involuntary Confinement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (3):261-294.score: 30.0
    My purpose in this paper is to show that current legal criteria for paternalistic involuntary psychiatric confinement of the mentally ill are both too narrow and too broad. I do this by first developing a principle of justified paternalistic interference with adults, which I take to be acceptably protective of individual liberty, but which does not require unnecessary sacrifices of individual welfare. After offering an analysis of current legal criteria for involuntary confinement, 1 argue that an acceptable theory of paternalistic (...)
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  38. Daniel Callahan (2005). Bioethics and the Culture Wars. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (4):424-431.score: 30.0
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  39. A. A. Eduard Verhagen, Pieter J. Sauer, Daniel Callahan, Frank A. Chervenak, Laurence B. McCullough, Birgit Arabin, Tim Smith & Georgia Goldfarb (2008). "Are Their Babies Different From Ours?": Dutch Culture and the Groningen Protocol. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):4-7.score: 30.0
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  40. Daniel Callahan (2011). Health Care Reform: Can a Communitarian Perspective Be Salvaged? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):351-362.score: 30.0
    The United States is culturally oriented more toward individual rights and values than to communitarian values. That proclivity has made it hard to develop a common good, or solidarity-based, perspective on health care. Too many people believe they have no obligation to support the health care of others and resist a strong role for government, higher taxation, or reduced health benefits. I argue that we need to build a communitarian perspective on the concept of solidarity, which has been the concept (...)
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  41. Daniel Callahan (2005). In Memoriam: Marc Lappé. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):10-10.score: 30.0
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  42. Daniel Callahan (2006). Universal Health Care: From the States to the Nation? Hastings Center Report 36 (5):28-29.score: 30.0
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  43. D. Callahan (2008). Europe and the United States: Contrast and Convergence. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (3):280-293.score: 30.0
    Though the health care systems of the United States and the European countries are very different, they are being buffeted by similar problems: rising health care costs caused by aging populations, technology, and rising public demand and expectations. The primary difference is that the US system is heavily privatized, whereas the European systems are heavily government run or operated. But the latter systems are increasingly open to market ideas and practices while the US is steadily being pushed toward a stronger (...)
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  44. John Francis Callahan (1948/1968). Four Views of Time in Ancient Philosophy. New York, Greenwood Press.score: 30.0
  45. John F. Callahan (1964). I. The “Ontological” Argument for the Existence of God. The Saint Augustine Lecture Series:1-47.score: 30.0
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  46. Daniel Callahan (1999). Shaping Biomedical Research Priorities: The Case of the National Institutes of Health. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (2):115-129.score: 30.0
    Despite the international interest in priority setting as an important tool for health policy, there has been comparatively little interest in the setting of research priorities. One of the few places where there has been such an interest is at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States. Under pressure from Congress to explain its priority setting process, the NIH has tried to explain the criteria and process it uses. The NIH procedure is described, and the problems created (...)
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  47. Daniel Callahan (1989). Moral Theory: Thinking, Doing, and Living. Journal of Social Philosophy 20 (1-2):18-24.score: 30.0
  48. Joan Callahan (2001). Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.score: 30.0
  49. Joan C. Callahan (1995). Christian Science Healing: An Alternative Health Care System? Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (3):105-111.score: 30.0
  50. Alexis Shotwell & Trevor Sangrey (2009). Resisting Definition: Gendering Through Interaction and Relational Selfhood. Hypatia 24 (3):56 - 76.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that trans and genderqueer people affect the gender formation and identity of non-trans people. We explore three instances of this relationship between trans and non-trans genders: an allegiance to inadequate liberal-individualist models of selfhood; tropes through which trans people are made to stand as theoretical objects with which to think about gender broadly; and a narrow focus on gender and evasion of an intersectional understanding of gender formation.
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