Search results for 'Ellis Heywood' (try it on Scholar)

989 found
Sort by:
  1. Ellis Heywood (1972). Il Moro; Ellis Heywood's Dialogue in Memory of Thomas More. Cambridge, Mass.,Harvard University Press.score: 570.0
    The original Italian text has been reproduced in the back of the volume.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, Douglas Denon Heath, William Rawley & James Spedding, Works; Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis and Douglas Denon Heath.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Heywood (2003). Divine Revelation and Human Learning: A Christian Theory of Knowledge /C David Heywood. Ashgate.score: 120.0
    For Christian education, this book provides a theological rationale for the use of methods of teaching and learning of educationally proven effectiveness.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, Douglas Denon Heath, William Rawley & James Spedding, Works; Collected and Edited by James Spedding, R.L. Ellis and D.D. Heath.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robinson Ellis (1899). Robinson Ellis Stadtmüller's Anthologia Graeca Vol. II. Teubner 1899. Pp. Xcii, 524. 8 Mk. The Classical Review 13 (09):444-447.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. H. D. Ellis, A. H. Quaylea, A. W. Young & K. W. de Pauw (1997). Response From Ellis, Young, Quayle and de Pauw. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):158.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. A. Ellis (1997). Why I Am a Secular Humanist: An Interview with Albert Ellis. Free Inquiry 17:35-36.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. B. D. Ellis (2001). Scientific Essentialism. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Scientific Essentialism defends the view that the fundamental laws of nature depend on the essential properties of the things on which they are said to operate, and are therefore not independent of them. These laws are not imposed upon the world by God, the forces of nature, or anything else, but rather are immanent in the world. Ellis argues that ours is a dynamic world consisting of more or less transient objects which are constantly interacting with each other, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Brian Ellis (2005). Marc Lange on Essentialism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):75 – 79.score: 60.0
    For scientific essentialists, the only logical possibilities of existence are the real (or metaphysical) ones, and such possibilities, they say, are relative to worlds. They are not a priori, and they cannot just be invented. Rather, they are discoverable only by the a posteriori methods of science. There are, however, many philosophers who think that real possibilities are knowable a priori, or that they can just be invented. Marc Lange [Lange 2004] thinks that they can be invented, and tries to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Fiona Ellis (2005). Concepts and Reality in the History of Philosophy: Tracing a Philosophical Error From Locke to Bradley. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This book traces a deep misunderstanding about the relation of concepts and reality in the history of philosophy. It exposes the influence of the mistake in the thought of Locke, Berkeley, Kant, Nietzche and Bradley, and suggests that the solution can be found in Hegelian thought. Ellis argues that the treatment proposed exemplifies Hegel's dialectical method. This is an important contribution to this area of philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ralph D. Ellis (2005). Generating Predictions From a Dynamical Systems Emotion Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):202-203.score: 60.0
    Lewis's dynamical systems emotion theory continues a tradition including Merleau-Ponty, von Bertallanfy, and Aristotle. Understandably for a young theory, Lewis's new predictions do not follow strictly from the theory; thus their failure would not disconfirm the theory, nor their success confirm it – especially given that other self-organizational approaches to emotion (e.g., those of Ellis and of Newton) may not be inconsistent with these same predictions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ralph D. Ellis (1995). Questioning Consciousness: The Interplay of Imagery, Cognition, and Emotion in the Human Brain. John Benjamins.score: 60.0
    ... Geoffrey Underwood (University of Nottingham) Francisco Varela (CREA, Ecole Polytechnique. Paris) Volume 2 Ralph D. Ellis Questioning Consciousness ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Brian Ellis (1971). On Conventionality and Simultaneity - a Reply. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):177 – 203.score: 60.0
    This paper is a response to the "panel discussion of simultaneity by slow clock transport in the special and general theories of relativity" ("philosophy of science", 36, (march, 1969), Pp. 1-81) which arose out of a paper by brian ellis and peter bowman on "conventionality in distant simultaneity", ("philosophy of science", 34, (june, 1967), Pp. 116-36). It is argued that the basic disagreement between the pittsburgh panel and us is an epistemological one. In particular, Our concept of a good (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Brian Ellis (2012). The Ideals of Social Humanism. Australian Humanist, The 108 (108):7.score: 60.0
    Ellis, Brian Humanists have an unconditional concern for the wellbeing and dignity of humankind. They are fundamentally concerned with increasing the overall quality of people's lives, regardless of their behaviour, and to treat people with respect. They seek to do so by promoting the development of people's natural talents and inculcating attitudes of mutual respect and tolerance. Their central idea is that every person should be treated with equal concern for their good.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.) (1986). Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 60.0
    INTRODUCTION TO ASPECTS OF FACE PROCESSING: TEN QUESTIONS IN NEED OF ANSWERS. HD Ellis 1. INTRODUCTION These proceedings of the first international ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.) (2000). The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization--An Anthology. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.score: 60.0
    CHAPTER 1 Integrating the Physiological and Phenomenological Dimensions of Affect and Motivation Ralph D. Ellis Clark Atlanta University A neglected but ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. B. D. Ellis (2012). Social Humanism: A New Metaphysics. Routledge.score: 60.0
    In this book, Ellis argues that moral and political objectives are not independent of one other, and so must be pursued in tandem. Social humanism is a moral and political philosophy that does just this.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mary Lynne Ellis (2010). Questioning Identities: Philosophy in Psychoanalytic Practice. Karnac.score: 60.0
    In this new book, Mary Lynne Ellis and Noreen O'Connor move to the heart of 21st century intertwining of psychoanalytical and philosophical critical reflections ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Brian Ellis (2013). Humanism and Society. Australian Humanist, The 110 (110):3.score: 60.0
    Ellis, Brian Humanism has a lot to offer the world. It is not just an individual moral philosophy, although it includes such a philosophy. Nor is it just a political program, although it implies one. The theory of social humanism, which was developed in a book I published last year, is both a moral and a political philosophy. It is socially democratic, and morally and politically humanistic.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ezra H. Heywood, The War Method of Peace (1863).score: 60.0
    At the request of our friend, Mr. Heywood, we give in full, on our last page, his address on “The War Method of Peace,” – a somewhat paradoxical title, – delivered before the Twenty-Eighth Congregational Society, at the Melodeon, on Sunday, June 14th. Of course, he alone is responsible for the views he presents; and, certainly, he is to be respected and commended for his conscientious fidelity to his convictions. But we cannot regard his treatment of the subject, in (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Nancey Murphy, George Ellis, O. ’Connor F. R. & Timothy (eds.) (2009). Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will. Springer Verlag.score: 60.0
    The book includes contributions by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, George F. R. Ellis , Christopher D. Frith, Mark Hallett, David Hodgson, Owen D. Jones, Alicia Juarrero, J. A. Scott Kelso, Christof Koch, Hans Küng, Hakwan C. Lau, Dean Mobbs, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Ellis (2011). Conversations with Cinematographers. Scarecrow Press.score: 60.0
    In Conversations with Cinematographers, David Ellis has assembled interviews with some of the most influential and highly regarded cameramen of the last half century and more.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Aimee Dars Ellis (2011). Engaging in Social Action at Work. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:253-264.score: 60.0
    Many organizations are utilizing corporate social responsibility initiatives that require employee participation. These initiatives, which involve social action at work (SAW), can be a source of reputational gains, benefit the community, and increase employee organizational identification (Ellis, 2009). Although research has been conducted on employee volunteer programs (EVP), one aspect of SAW, those studies have not identified the characteristics of employees who are most likely to participate in EVP nor have they considered the wide range of SAW programs. In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Aimee Dars Ellis & Michael McCall (2012). For Me or for You? The Relative Power of Rebates for a Cause. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:60-65.score: 60.0
    In traditional rebates, consumers submit proof of purchase for an item and then receive a portion of the purchase price, usually in the form of a check or gift card. In contrast, when a consumer redeems a cause rebate, a cash reward is given not to the consumer but to a non-profit organization (Ellis & McCall, 2011). In this paper, we aim to determine the attitudes toward and effectiveness of cause rebates versus traditional rebates. This will help marketers develop (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Brian Ellis (2010). Causal Powers and Categorical Properties. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that there are categorical properties as well as causal powers, and that the world would not exist as we know it without them. For categorical properties are needed to define the powers—to locate them, and to specify their laws of action. These categorical properties, I shall argue, are not dispositional. For their identities do not depend on what they dispose their bearers to do. They are, as Alexander Bird would say, ’quiddities’. But (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse (1992). The World as One of a Kind: Natural Necessity and Laws of Nature. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):371-388.score: 30.0
  27. Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse (1994). Dispositional Essentialism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):27 – 45.score: 30.0
  28. Jonathan Ellis (2010). Phenomenal Character, Phenomenal Concepts, and Externalism. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):273 - 299.score: 30.0
    A celebrated problem for representationalist theories of phenomenal character is that, given externalism about content, these theories lead to externalism about phenomenal character. While externalism about content is widely accepted, externalism about phenomenal character strikes many philosophers as wildly implausible. Even if internally identical individuals could have different thoughts, it is said, if one of them has a headache, or a tingly sensation, so must the other. In this paper, I argue that recent work on phenomenal concepts reveals that, contrary (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Brian Ellis (2000). Causal Laws and Singular Causation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):329-351.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Edoardo Zamuner & Brian Ellis (forthcoming). “Review of Machery’s ‘Doing Without Concepts’”. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ralph D. Ellis (2006). Phenomenology-Friendly Neuroscience: The Return to Merleau-Ponty as Psychologist. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (1):33 - 55.score: 30.0
    This paper reports on the Kuhnian revolution now occurring in neuropsychology that is finally supportive of and friendly to phenomenology – the “enactive” approach to the mind-body relation, grounded in the notion of self-organization, which is consistent with Husserl and Merleau-Ponty on virtually every point. According to the enactive approach, human minds understand the world by virtue of the ways our bodies can act relative to it, or the ways we can imagine acting. This requires that action be distinguished from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Brian Ellis (2004). Scientific Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):495-497.score: 30.0
  33. Brian Ellis (2005). Universals, the Essential Problem and Categorical Properties. Ratio 18 (4):462–472.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Anthony Ellis (2003). A Deterrence Theory of Punishment. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (212):337–351.score: 30.0
    I start from the presupposition that the use of force against another is justified only in self-defence or in defence of others against aggression. If so, the main work of justifying punishment must rely on its deterrent effect, since most punishments have no other significant self-defensive effect. It has often been objected to the deterrent justification of punishment that it commits us to using offenders unacceptably, and that it is unable to deliver acceptable limits on punishment. I describe a sort (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Anthony Ellis (2005). Minority Rights and the Preservation of Languages. Philosophy 80 (2):199-217.score: 30.0
    Do minority groups have a right to the preservation of their language? I argue that the rights of groups are always reducible to the rights of individuals. In that case, the question whether minorities have a right to the preservation of their language is a question of whether individuals have a right to it. I argue that, in the only relevant sense of ‘right’, they do not. They may have an interest in the preservation of their language, but, if so, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas B. Ellis (2012). Growing Up Amid the Religion and Science Affair: A Perspective From Indology. Zygon 47 (3):589-607.score: 30.0
    Abstract This article identifies the tropes of “maturity” and “immaturity” in the dialogue between religion and science. On both sides of the aisle, authors charge, either directly or indirectly, that their dissenting interlocutors are not mature enough to see the value of their respective positions. Such accusations have recently emerged in discussions pertaining to Hindu theology, Indology, and science. Those who dismiss the substance dualism of Hindu yoga, according to Jonathan B. Edelmann, evince immaturity. Appeals to Hindu yoga are yet (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jonathan Ellis (forthcoming). Stroud's Modest Transcendental Argument. In W. Wong, N. Kolodny & J. Bridges (eds.), The Possibility of Philosophical Understanding: Essays for Barry Stroud. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Barry Stroud is well known as a critic of philosophers who purport to answer, or otherwise deflate, the threat of skepticism of the external world. He is most famous in this regard for his seminal paper on transcendental arguments, in which he argues that the prospects of defeating the skeptic with such arguments typically depend upon an implausible form of verification principle. There he mostly focuses upon Strawson and Shoemaker. But since then, Stroud has addressed strategies taken against skepticism as (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Brian Ellis (1988). Internal Realism. Synthese 76 (3):409 - 434.score: 30.0
    I argue in this paper that anyone who accepts the ontology of scientific realism can only accept a pragmatic theory of truth, i.e., a theory on which truth is what it is epistemically right to believe. But the combination of realism with such a theory of truth is a form of internal realism; therefore, a scientific realist should be an internal realist. The strategy of the paper is to argue that there is no adequate semantic or correspondence theory of truth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. George F. R. Ellis (2006). On the Nature of Emergent Reality. In Philip Clayton & Paul Sheldon Davies (eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert M. Ellis (2011). The Trouble with Buddhism. Lulu.com.score: 30.0
    This book is a philosophical critique of the Buddhist tradition (not a scholarly work about the Buddhist tradition), applying the standards of judgement developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. It is argued that although the Buddhist tradition provides access to the insights of the Middle Way, many other aspects of Buddhist tradition are inconsistent with this central insight. The sources of justified belief in Buddhism, karma, conditionality, concepts of reality, monasticism and Buddhist ethics are all subjected to the same (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Brian Ellis (2005). Physical Realism. Ratio 18 (4):371–384.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz (1999). Attention Without Awareness in Blindsight. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 266:1805-11.score: 30.0
  43. Anthony Ellis (2006). What is Special About Religion? Law and Philosophy 25 (2):219-241.score: 30.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A Theory of Moral Objectivity. Lulu.com.score: 30.0
    An inter-disciplinary philosophical treatise (written as an accredited Ph.D. thesis) that attempts to establish a new approach to moral objectivity. Inspired by the Buddha's Middle Way, but arguing from first premises, it challenges widespread and interlinked assumptions in both analytic and continental philosophy, whilst drawing on both these traditions together with psychological, religious and historical evidence. The first section of the book provides a detailed critique of existing approaches to ethics in the Western tradition. The second half then puts forward (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood (2000). Metacognition and Awareness. Consciousness And Cognition 9 (2):308-312.score: 30.0
    It is tempting to assume that metacognitive processes necessarily evoke awareness. We review a number of experiments in which cognitive schema have been shown to develop without awareness. Implicit learning of a novel schema may not involve metacognitive regulation per se. Substitution of one automatic process by another as a result of the inadequacy of the former as circumstances change does, however, clearly involve metacognitive and executive processes of error correction and schema selection. We describe a recently published study in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Robert Pargetter (1988). Forces. Philosophy of Science 55 (4):614-630.score: 30.0
    Traditionally, forces are causes of a special sort. Forces have been conceived to be the direct or immediate causes of things. Other sorts of causes act indirectly by producing forces which are transmitted in various ways to produce various effects. However, forces are supposed to act directly without the mediation of anything else. But forces, so conceived, appear to be occult. They are mysterious, because we have no clear conception of what they are, as opposed to what they are postulated (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jonathan Ellis (forthcoming). The Relevance of Radical Interpretation. In J. Malpas (ed.), The Hermeneutic Davidson. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    In Davidson’s philosophy, one finds a wide variety of rich, provocative, and influential arguments concerning the nature of the mind—that mental states emerge only in the context of interpretation, that belief is “in its nature” veridical, that mental events are physical events, and so on. Most, if not all, of Davidson’s conclusions about the mind have their source in discussions about the project of “radical interpretation.” They rely upon arguments concerning the conditions on the successful interpretation of a speaker by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (2005). Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
    The papers in this volume of Consciousness & Emotion Book Series are organized around the theme of "enaction.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jonathan Ellis, Can an Externalist About Concepts Be an Internalist About Phenomenal Character.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers today believe that what an individual is thinking does not depend entirely on the individual.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Brian Ellis (1988). Solving the Problem of Induction Using a Values-Based Epistemology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (2):141-160.score: 30.0
1 — 50 / 989