Search results for 'Embodied Simulation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vittorio Gallese (2005). Embodied Simulation: From Neurons to Phenomenal Experience. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):23-48.
    The same neural structures involved in the unconscious modeling of our acting body in space also contribute to our awareness of the lived body and of the objects that the world contains. Neuroscientific research also shows that there are neural mechanisms mediating between the multi-level personal experience we entertain of our lived body, and the implicit certainties we simultaneously hold about others. Such personal and body-related experiential knowledge enables us to understand the actions performed by others, and to directly decode (...)
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  2.  32
    Vittorio Gallese & Corrado Sinigaglia (2011). What is so Special About Embodied Simulation? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (11):512-519.
    Simulation theories of social cognition abound in the literature, but it is often unclear what simulation means and how it works. The discovery of mirror neurons, responding both to action execution and observation, suggested an embodied approach to mental simulation. Over the last years this approach has been hotly debated and alternative accounts have been proposed. We discuss these accounts and argue that they fail to capture the uniqueness of embodied simulation (ES). ES theory (...)
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  3.  15
    Vittorio Gallese & Corrado Sinigaglia (2012). Response to de Bruin and Gallagher: Embodied Simulation as Reuse is a Productive Explanation of a Basic Form of Mind-Reading. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):99-100.
    de Bruin & Gallagher suggest that the view of embodied simulation put forward in our recent article lacks explanatory power. We argue that the notion of reuse of mental states represented with a bodily format provides a convincing simulational account of the mirroring mechanism and its role in mind -reading.
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  4.  11
    Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess (2010). The Simulation of Smiles (SIMS) Model: Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):417.
    Recent application of theories of embodied or grounded cognition to the recognition and interpretation of facial expression of emotion has led to an explosion of research in psychology and the neurosciences. However, despite the accelerating number of reported findings, it remains unclear how the many component processes of emotion and their neural mechanisms actually support embodied simulation. Equally unclear is what triggers the use of embodied simulation versus perceptual or conceptual strategies in determining meaning. The (...)
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  5. Edoardo Zamuner & Julian Kiverstein (2010). Could Embodied Simulation Be a by-Product of Emotion Perception? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):449 - 449.
    The SIMS model claims that it is by means of an embodied simulation that we determine the meaning of an observed smile. This suggests that crucial interpretative work is done in the mapping that takes us from a perceived smile to the activation of one's own facial musculature. How is this mapping achieved? Might it depend upon a prior interpretation arrived at on the basis of perceptual and contextual information?
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  6. Shannon Spaulding (2011). A Critique of Embodied Simulation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):579-599.
    Social cognition is the capacity to understand and interact with others. The mainstream account of social cognition is mindreading, the view that we humans understanding others by interpreting their behavior in terms of mental states. Recently theorists from philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience have challenged the mindreading account, arguing for a more deflationary account of social cognition. In this paper I examine a deflationary account of social cognition, embodied simulation, which is inspired by recent neuroscientific findings. I argue that (...)
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  7.  5
    Jacob M. Vigil & Patrick Coulombe (2010). Embodied Simulation and the Search for Meaning Are Not Necessary for Facial Expression Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):461 - 463.
    Embodied simulation and the epistemic motivation to search for the of other people's behaviors are not necessary for specific and functional responding to, and hence processing of, human facial expressions. Rather, facial expression processing can be achieved through lower-cognitive, heuristical perceptual processing and expression of prototypical morphological musculature movement patterns that communicate discrete trustworthiness and capacity cues to conspecifics.
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  8. Vittorio Gallese & Michele Guerra (2012). Embodying Movies: Embodied Simulation and Film Studies. Cinema 3:183-210.
    Recent discoveries in neuroscience, among which that of mirror neurons ,have strongly influenced the debate on spatial cognition, action, emotion andempathy, all aspects that in recent years have been deeply reconsidered within film studies. This article focuses on the role embodied simulation theory—triggered by the discovery of MNs—plays in film experience. ES has beenproposed to constitute a basic functional mechanism of humans’ brain.Because of a shared bodily representational format, we map the actions of others onto our own motor (...)
     
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  9.  3
    Raymond W. Gibbs (2013). Artistic Understanding as Embodied Simulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):143 - 144.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) correctly include historical perspectives into the scientific study of art appreciation. But artistic understanding always emerges from embodied simulation processes that incorporate the ongoing dynamics of brains, bodies, and world interactions. There may not be separate modes of artistic understanding, but a continuum of processes that provide imaginative simulations of the artworks we see or hear.
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    Li Huang & Adam D. Galinsky (2010). No Mirrors for the Powerful: Why Dominant Smiles Are Not Processed Using Embodied Simulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):448-448.
    A complete model of smile interpretation needs to incorporate its social context. We argue that embodied simulation is an unlikely route for understanding dominance smiles, which typically occur in the context of power. We support this argument by discussing the lack of eye contact with dominant faces and the facial and postural complementarity, rather than mimicry, that pervades hierarchical relationships.
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  11.  64
    Raymond W. Gibbs Jr (2006). Metaphor Interpretation as Embodied Simulation. Mind and Language 21 (3):434–458.
    Cognitive theories of metaphor understanding are typically described in terms of the mappings between different kinds of abstract, schematic, disembodied knowledge. My claim in this paper is that part of our ability to make sense of metaphorical language, both individual utterances and extended narratives, resides in the automatic construction of a simulation whereby we imagine performing the bodily actions referred to in the language. Thus, understanding metaphorical expressions like ‘grasp a concept’ or ‘get over’ an emotion involve simulating what (...)
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  12. Vittorio Gallese (2007). Before and Below 'Theory of Mind': Embodied Simulation and the Neural Correlates of Social Cognition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 362 (1480):659-669.
  13.  9
    Leon de Bruin & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Embodied Simulation, an Unproductive Explanation: Comment on Gallese and Sinigaglia. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):98-99.
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  14. Vittorio Gallese (2007). The "Conscious" Dorsal Stream: Embodied Simulation and its Role in Space and Action Conscious Awareness. Psyche 13.
    The aim of the present article is three-fold. First, it aims to show that perception requires action. This is most evident for some types of visual percept . Second, it aims to show that the distinction of the cortical visual processing into two streams is insufficient and leads to possible misunderstandings on the true nature of perceptual processes. Third, it aims to show that the dorsal stream is not only responsible for the unconscious control of action, but also for the (...)
     
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  15.  15
    Vittorio Gallese (2009). The Two Sides of Mimesis: Girards Mimetic Theory, Embodied Simulation and Social Identification. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):21-44.
    Crucial in Girard's Mimetic Theory is the notion of mimetic desire, viewed as appropriative mimicry, the main source of aggressiveness and violence characterizing our species. The intrinsic value of the objects of our desire is not as relevant as the fact that the very same objects are the targets of others' desire. One could in principle object against such apparently negative and one-sided view of mankind, in general, and of mimesis, in particular. However, such argument would misrepresent Girard's thought. Girard (...)
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  16.  32
    Raymond W. Gibbs (2006). Metaphor Interpretation as Embodied Simulation. Mind Language 21 (3):434-458.
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  17.  2
    André Weinreich & Jakob Maria Funcke (2014). Embodied Simulation as Part of Affective Evaluation Processes: Task Dependence of Valence Concordant EMG Activity. Cognition and Emotion 28 (4):728-736.
  18.  2
    Kris Evers, Ilse Noens, Jean Steyaert & Johan Wagemans (2010). Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression in Autism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):445-446.
    We outline three possible shortcomings of the SIMS model and specify these by applying the model to autism. First, the SIMS model assigns a causal role to brain processes, thereby excluding individual and situational factors. Second, there is no room for subjective and high-level conceptual processes in the model. Third, disentangling the different stages in the model is very difficult.
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  19. Valentina Cuccio (2015). Embodied Simulation and Metaphors. On the Role of the Body in the Interpretation of Bodily-Based Metaphors. Epistemologia 1:99-113.
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  20. Raymond W. Gibbs Jr (2006). Embodied Simulation in Metaphor Interpretation. Mind and Language 21:434-458.
     
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  21. Raymond W. Gibbs (2006). Metaphor Interpretation as Embodied Simulation. Mind Language 21 (3):434-458.
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  22. Sergeiy Sandler (2011). Reenactment: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Meaning and Linguistic Content. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):583-598.
    A central finding in experimental research identified with Embodied Cognition (EC) is that understanding actions involves their embodied simulation, i.e. executing some processes involved in performing these actions. Extending these findings, I argue that reenactment – the overt embodied simulation of actions and practices, including especially communicative actions and practices, within utterances – makes it possible to forge an integrated EC-based account of linguistic meaning. In particular, I argue: (a) that remote entities can (...)
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  23.  25
    Max Louwerse & Louise Connell (2011). A Taste of Words: Linguistic Context and Perceptual Simulation Predict the Modality of Words. Cognitive Science 35 (2):381-398.
    Previous studies have shown that object properties are processed faster when they follow properties from the same perceptual modality than properties from different modalities. These findings suggest that language activates sensorimotor processes, which, according to those studies, can only be explained by a modal account of cognition. The current paper shows how a statistical linguistic approach of word co-occurrences can also reliably predict the category of perceptual modality a word belongs to (auditory, olfactory–gustatory, visual–haptic), even though the statistical (...) approach is less precise than the modal approach (auditory, gustatory, haptic, olfactory, visual). Moreover, the statistical linguistic approach is compared with the modal embodied approach in an experiment in which participants verify properties that share or shift modalities. Response times suggest that fast responses can best be explained by the linguistic account, whereas slower responses can best be explained by the embodied account. These results provide further evidence for the theory that conceptual processing is both linguistic and embodied, whereby less precise linguistic processes precede precise simulation processes. (shrink)
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  24.  23
    Guy Dove (2014). Thinking in Words: Language as an Embodied Medium of Thought. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):371-389.
    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the idea that natural language enhances and extends our cognitive capabilities. Supporters of embodied cognition have been particularly interested in the way in which language may provide a solution to the problem of abstract concepts. Toward this end, some have emphasized the way in which language may act as form of cognitive scaffolding and others have emphasized the potential importance of language-based distributional information. This essay defends a version of (...)
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  25.  30
    Christopher Letheby (2012). In Defence of Embodied Cognition: A Reply to Fred Adams. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):403-414.
    Fred Adams : 619–628, 2010) criticizes the theory of embodied cognition which holds that conceptual and linguistic thought is grounded in the brain’s perceptual and sensorimotor systems. Among other things, Adams claims that: EC is potentially committed to an implausible criterion of sentence meaningfulness; EC lacks claimed advantages over rival accounts of conceptual thought; relevant experimental data do not show constitutive, but only causal, involvement of perception in conception; and EC cannot account for the comprehension of abstract concepts. I (...)
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  26.  7
    Edwin Hutchins & Christine M. Johnson (2009). Modeling the Emergence of Language as an Embodied Collective Cognitive Activity. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):523-546.
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  27.  7
    John J. Clement (2009). The Role of Imagistic Simulation in Scientific Thought Experiments. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (4):686-710.
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  28. Shannon Spaulding (2014). Embodied Cognition and Theory of Mind. In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge 197-206.
    According to embodied cognition, the philosophical and empirical literature on theory of mind is misguided. Embodied cognition rejects the idea that social cognition requires theory of mind. It regards the intramural debate between the Theory Theory and the Simulation Theory as irrelevant, and it dismisses the empirical studies on theory of mind as ill conceived and misleading. Embodied cognition provides a novel deflationary account of social cognition that does not depend (...)
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  29.  9
    Louise Connell & Dermot Lynott (2011). Modality Switching Costs Emerge in Concept Creation as Well as Retrieval. Cognitive Science 35 (4):763-778.
    Theories of embodied cognition hold that the conceptual system uses perceptual simulations for the purposes of representation. A strong prediction is that perceptual phenomena should emerge in conceptual processing, and, in support, previous research has shown that switching modalities from one trial to the next incurs a processing cost during conceptual tasks. However, to date, such research has been limited by its reliance on the retrieval of familiar concepts. We therefore examined concept creation by asking participants to interpret modality-specific (...)
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  30. Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2011). The Extended Mind: Born to Be Wild? A Lesson From Action-Understanding. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):377-397.
    The extended mind hypothesis (Clark and Chalmers in Analysis 58(1):7–19, 1998; Clark 2008) is an influential hypothesis in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. I argue that the extended mind hypothesis is born to be wild. It has undeniable and irrepressible tendencies of flouting grounding assumptions of the traditional information-processing paradigm. I present case-studies from social cognition which not only support the extended mind proposal but also bring out its inherent wildness. In particular, I focus on cases of action-understanding and (...)
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  31.  27
    John Michael (2012). Mirror Systems and Simulation: A Neo-Empiricist Interpretation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):565-582.
    It is often claimed that the discovery of mirror neurons supports simulation theory (ST). There has been much controversy about this, however, as there are various competing models of the functional contribution of mirror systems, only some of which characterize mirroring as simulation in the sense required by ST. But a brief review of these models reveals that they all include simulation in some sense . In this paper, I propose that the broader conception of simulation (...)
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  32.  11
    Victoria Pitts‐Taylor (2013). I Feel Your Pain: Embodied Knowledges and Situated Neurons. Hypatia 28 (4):852-869.
    The widely touted discovery of mirror neurons has generated intense scientific interest in the neurobiology of intersubjectivity. Social neuroscientists have claimed that mirror neurons, located in brain regions associated with motor action, facial recognition, and somatosensory processing, allow us to automatically grasp other people's intentions and emotions. Despite controversies, mirror neuron research is animating materialist, affective, and embodied accounts of intersubjectivity. My view is that mirror neurons raise issues that are directly relevant to feminism and cultural studies, but interventions (...)
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  33.  1
    Piotr Winkielman (2010). Embodied and Disembodied Processing of Emotional Expressions: Insights From Autism Spectrum Disorders. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):463 - 464.
    Processing of facial expressions goes beyond simple pattern recognition. To elucidate this problem, Niedenthal et al. offer a model that identifies multiple embodied and disembodied routes for expression processing, and spell out conditions triggering use of different routes. I elaborate on this model by discussing recent research on emotional recognition in individuals with autism, who can use multiple routes of emotion processing, and consequently can show atypical and typical patterns of embodied simulation and mimicry.
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  34. Pablo Briñol, Kenneth G. DeMarree & K. Rachelle Smith (2010). The Role of Embodied Change in Perceiving and Processing Facial Expressions of Others. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):437-438.
    The embodied simulation of smiles involves motor activity that often changes the perceivers' own emotional experience (e.g., smiling can make us feel happy). Although Niedenthal et al. mention this possibility, the psychological processes by which embodiment changes emotions and their consequences for processing other emotions are not discussed in the target article's review. We argue that understanding the processes initiated by embodiment is important for a complete understanding of the effects of embodiment on emotion perception.
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  35. Shaun Gallagher (2001). The Practice of Mind: Theory, Simulation or Primary Interaction? Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):83-108.
    Theory of mind explanations of how we know other minds are limited in several ways. First, they construe intersubjective relations too narrowly in terms of the specialized cognitive abilities of explaining and predicting another person's mental states and behaviors. Second, they sometimes draw conclusions about secondperson interaction from experiments designed to test third-person observation of another's behavior. As a result, the larger claims that are sometimes made for theory of mind, namely, that theory of mind is our primary and pervasive (...)
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  36.  28
    Maria Brincker (2014). Navigating Beyond “Here & Now” Affordances—on Sensorimotor Maturation and “False Belief” Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    How and when do we learn to understand other people's perspectives and possibly divergent beliefs? This question has elicited much theoretical and empirical research. A puzzling finding has been that toddlers perform well on so-called implicit false belief (FB) tasks but do not show such capacities on traditional explicit FB tasks. I propose a navigational approach, which offers a hitherto ignored way of making sense of the seemingly contradictory results. The proposal involves a distinction between how we navigate FBs as (...)
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  37. Nick Bostrom (2009). The Simulation Argument: Some Explanations. Analysis 69 (3):458-461.
    Anthony Brueckner, in a recent article, proffers ‘a new way of thinking about Bostrom's Simulation Argument’ . His comments, however, misconstrue the argument; and some words of explanation are in order.The Simulation Argument purports to show, given some plausible assumptions, that at least one of three propositions is true . Roughly stated, these propositions are: almost all civilizations at our current level of development go extinct before reaching technological maturity; there is a strong convergence among technologically mature civilizations (...)
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  38.  8
    Norm Friesen (2011). Dissection and Simulation. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 15 (3):185-200.
    The increasing use of online simulations as replacements for animal dissection in the classroom or lab raises important questions about the nature of simulation itself and its relationship to embodied educational experience. This paper addresses these questions first by presenting a comparative hermeneutic-phenomenological investigation of online and offline dissection. It then interprets the results of this study in terms of Borgmann’s (1992) notion of the intentional “transparency” and “pliability” of simulated hyperreality. It makes the case that it is (...)
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  39.  12
    Louise Connell & Dermot Lynott (2014). Principles of Representation: Why You Can't Represent the Same Concept Twice. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):390-406.
    As embodied theories of cognition are increasingly formalized and tested, care must be taken to make informed assumptions regarding the nature of concepts and representations. In this study, we outline three reasons why one cannot, in effect, represent the same concept twice. First, online perception affects offline representation: Current representational content depends on how ongoing demands direct attention to modality-specific systems. Second, language is a fundamental facilitator of offline representation: Bootstrapping and shortcuts within the computationally cheaper linguistic system continuously (...)
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  40.  6
    Mark Andrews, Stefan Frank & Gabriella Vigliocco (2014). Reconciling Embodied and Distributional Accounts of Meaning in Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):359-370.
    Over the past 15 years, there have been two increasingly popular approaches to the study of meaning in cognitive science. One, based on theories of embodied cognition, treats meaning as a simulation of perceptual and motor states. An alternative approach treats meaning as a consequence of the statistical distribution of words across spoken and written language. On the surface, these appear to be opposing scientific paradigms. In this review, we aim to show how recent cross-disciplinary developments have done (...)
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  41.  1
    Andriy Myachykov, Wouter Platenburg & Martin H. Fischer (2009). Non-Abstractness as Mental Simulation in the Representation of Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):343 - 344.
    ion is instrumental for our understanding of how numbers are cognitively represented. We propose that the notion of abstraction becomes testable from within the framework of simulated cognition. We describe mental simulation as embodied, grounded, and situated cognition, and report evidence for number representation at each of these levels of abstraction.
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  42.  15
    Andreas K. A. Georgiou (2007). An Embodied Cognition View of Lmagery-Based Reasoning in Science. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):215-248.
    I consider how we might begin to redress a cognitive model for thought experimental and other imagery-based scientific reasoning from an embodied cognition viewpoint. The paper gravitates on clarifying tour issues: (i) the danger of understanding the genuine novelty of thought-experimental reasoning and other imagery-based reasoning as a product of ‘quasi-perceiving’ new phenomenology with the ‘mind’s eye’ (as asserted by quasi-pictorialist theories of imagery); (ii) the erroneous choice of units of analysis that assume equivalence of external (...)
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  43.  1
    Marian Stewart Bartlett (2010). Emotion Simulation and Expression Understanding: A Case for Time. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):434-435.
    Niedenthal et al. present a model for embodied emotion simulation and expression understanding that spans multiple brain systems. This commentary addresses the potential role of time in this model, and its implications for understanding social dysfunction.
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  44. Maria Brincker (2012). If the Motor System is No Mirror€. In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “mirror” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2] (Gallese 2003, 2004, 2007; Gallese & Goldman 1998; Goldman 2009; Hurley 2008). The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our (...)
     
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  45. Alvin I. Goldman (2013). Joint Ventures: Mindreading, Mirroring, and Embodied Cognition. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What distinguishes humankind from other species? A leading candidate is our facility at mutual understanding, our ability to ascribe thoughts, desires, and feelings to one another. How do we do this? Folk-wisdom says, "By empathy -- we put ourselves in other people's shoes". In the last few decades this idea has moved from folk-wisdom to philosophical conjecture to serious scientific theory. This volume collects essays by Alvin Goldman, many of which have played a major role in crystallizing this "simulation," (...)
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  46.  4
    Rolf A. Zwaan, Carol J. Madden, Richard H. Yaxley & Mark E. Aveyard (2004). Moving Words: Dynamic Representations in Language Comprehension. Cognitive Science 28 (4):611-619.
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  47.  81
    Susan L. Hurley (2008). The Shared Circuits Model. How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation and Mind Reading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is cast at a (...)
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  48.  33
    Pierre Jacob (2009). A Philosopher's Reflections on the Discovery of Mirror Neurons. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):570-595.
    Mirror neurons fire both when a primate executes a transitive action directed toward a target (e.g., grasping) and when he observes the same action performed by another. According to the prevalent interpretation, action-mirroring is a process of interpersonal neural similarity whereby an observer maps the agent's perceived movements onto her own motor repertoire. Furthermore, ever since Gallese and Goldman's (1998) influential paper, action-mirroring has been linked to third-person mindreading on the grounds that it enables an observer to represent the agent's (...)
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  49.  20
    John A. Teske (2013). From Embodied to Extended Cognition. Zygon 48 (3):759-787.
    Embodied cognitive science holds that cognitive processes are deeply and inescapably rooted in our bodily interactions with the world. Our finite, contingent, and mortal embodiment may be not only supportive, but in some cases even constitutive of emotions, thoughts, and experiences. My discussion here will work outward from the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the brain to a nervous system which extends to the boundaries of the body. It will extend to nonneural aspects of embodiment and even beyond the boundaries (...)
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  50.  1
    Nicolas Vermeulen, Paula M. Niedenthal & Olivier Luminet (2007). Switching Between Sensory and Affective Systems Incurs Processing Costs. Cognitive Science 31 (1):183-192.
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