Search results for 'Embryonic stem cells Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Patrick L. Taylor (2005). The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.score: 899.2
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents (...)
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  2. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Cenger for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.score: 849.0
     
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  3. Mi-Kyung Kim (2009). Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.score: 808.4
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental (...)
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  4. Minou Bernadette Friele (2008). Rechtsethik der Embryonenforschung: Rechtsharmonisierung in Moralisch Umstrittenen Bereichen. Mentis.score: 768.0
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  5. A. -K. M. Andersson (2011). Embryonic Stem Cells and Property Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):221-242.score: 717.6
    This article contributes to the current debate on human embryonic stem cell researchers’ possible complicity in the destruction of human embryos and the relevance of such complicity for the issue of commodification of human embryos. I will discuss if, and to what extent, researchers who destroy human embryos, and researchers who merely use human embryos destroyed by others, have moral use rights, and/or moral property rights, in these embryos. I argue that the moral status of the human embryo, (...)
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  6. William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.score: 703.2
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy (...)
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  7. S. Aksoy (2005). Making Regulations and Drawing Up Legislation in Islamic Countries Under Conditions of Uncertainty, with Special Reference to Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):399-403.score: 614.0
  8. Dong‐Bo Ou, Hong‐Juan Lang, Rui Chen, Xiong‐Tao Liu & Qiang‐Sun Zheng (2009). Using Embryonic Stem Cells to Form a Biological Pacemaker Via Tissue Engineering Technology. Bioessays 31 (2):246-252.score: 604.8
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  9. Philip J. Nickel (2008). Ethical Issues in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. In Kristen Renwick Monroe, Ronald B. Miller & Jerome Tobis (eds.), Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical & Political Issues. University of California Press.score: 592.8
    As a moral philosopher, the perspective I will take in this chapter is one of argumentation and informed judgment about two main questions: whether individuals should ever choose to conduct human embryonic stem cell research, and whether the law should permit this type of research. I will also touch upon a secondary question, that of whether the government ought to pay for this type of research. I will discuss some of the main arguments at stake, and explain how (...)
     
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  10. Frank Zenker (2010). Analyzing Social Policy Argumentation: A Case Study on the Opinion of the German National Ethics Council on an Amendment of the Stem Cell Law. Informal Logic 30 (1):62-91.score: 591.2
    This paper analyzes and evaluates the 2007 majority opinion of the German National Ethics Council which seeks to establish new information (as to the inferior quality of legally procurable human embryonic stem cells) as a sufficient reason for a relaxation of the 2002 Stem Cell Law. A micro-level analysis of the opinion’s central section is conducted and evaluated vis à vis the strongest known opponent position in the national debate at that time. The argumentation is claimed (...)
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  11. Jan P. Beckmann (2004). On the German Debate on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):603 – 621.score: 567.2
    Germany since 1990 has one of the strictest human embryo protection laws, yet according to the Stem Cell Act of 2002 allows, under strict conditions, the import and use of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) for high priority research goals. The author tries to show how this is taken to be coherent by the parliamentary majority (though not necessarily by the general public) in Germany. In doing so, he firstly looks into the chronicle of the debate (...)
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  12. Joseph J. Fins & Madeleine Schachter (2002). Patently Controversial: Markets, Morals, and the President's Proposal for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (3):265-278.score: 567.2
    : This essay considers the implications of President George W. Bush's proposal for human embryonic stem cell research. Through the perspective of patent law, privacy, and informed consent, we elucidate the ongoing controversy about the moral standing of human embryonic stem cells and their derivatives and consider how the inconsistencies in the president's proposal will affect clinical practice and research.
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  13. Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.score: 554.4
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for (...)
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  14. Demetrio Neri (2011). The Race Toward 'Ethically Universally Acceptable' Human Pluripotent (Embryonic-Like) Stem Cells: Only a Problem of Sources? Bioethics 25 (5):260-266.score: 546.0
    Over the past few years, several proposals aimed at procuring human pluripotent (embryonic-like) stem cells without involving the destruction of a human embryo have been proposed and widely discussed. This article focuses on a basic aspect of the debate, namely the plausibility of one or more of these new proposals being able to meet the ethical requirements that those who regard the human embryo as sacred have tried to impose on stem cells research in the (...)
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  15. Roman J. Krawetz, Xiangyun Li & Derrick E. Rancourt (2009). Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Caught Between a ROCK Inhibitor and a Hard Place. Bioessays 31 (3):336-343.score: 542.4
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  16. Françoise Baylis (2009). For Love or Money? The Saga of Korean Women Who Provided Eggs for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.score: 534.0
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid consents (...)
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  17. Nicholas Agar (2007). Embryonic Potential and Stem Cells. Bioethics 21 (4):198–207.score: 533.4
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  18. Godfrey B. Tangwa (2007). Moral Status of Embryonic Stem Cells: Perspective of an African Villager. Bioethics 21 (8):449–457.score: 511.2
  19. Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry (2007). Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position. Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.score: 508.8
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and (...)
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  20. David B. Resnik (2007). Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity. Health Care Analysis 15 (3):211-222.score: 472.8
    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity (...)
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  21. David B. Resnik (2002). The Commercialization of Human Stem Cells: Ethical and Policy Issues. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):127-154.score: 455.4
    The first stage of the human embryonic stem(ES) cell research debate revolved aroundfundamental questions, such as whether theresearch should be done at all, what types ofresearch may be done, who should do theresearch, and how the research should befunded. Now that some of these questions arebeing answered, we are beginning to see thenext stage of the debate: the battle forproperty rights relating to human ES cells. The reason why property rights will be a keyissue in this debate (...)
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  22. Audrey R. Chapman & Courtney C. Scala (2012). Evaluating the First-in-Human Clinical Trial of a Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Therapy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (3):243-261.score: 448.8
    The transition of novel and potentially promising medical therapies into their initial human clinical trials can engender conflicting pressures. On the one side, because Phase I trials raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, there is a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials, especially if the FIH trial involves significant risks. On (...)
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  23. Andrew Fenton & Frederic Gilbert (2011). On the Use of Animals in Emergent Embryonic Stem Cell Research for Spinal Cord Injuries. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):37-45.score: 441.6
    In early 2009, President Obama overturned the ban on federal funding for research involving the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also approved Geron’s first-in-human hESC trial for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We anticipate an increase in both research in the United States to derive hESC and applications to the FDA for approval of clinical trials involving transplantation of hESCs. An increase of such clinical trials will require a concomitant (...)
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  24. Audrey R. Chapman (2009). The Ethics of Patenting Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (3):pp. 261-288.score: 432.0
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  25. Jeffrey L. Ecker & Patricia Pearl O'Rourke (2007). An Immodest Proposal: Banking Embryonic Stem Cells for Solid Organ Transplantation is Problematic and Premature. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (8):48 – 50.score: 432.0
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  26. William B. Hurlbut (2005). Altered Nuclear Transfer as a Morally Acceptable Means for the Procurement of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (2):211-228.score: 432.0
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  27. F. Simonstein (2008). Embryonic Stem Cells: The Disagreement Debate and Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Israel. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (10):732-734.score: 432.0
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  28. Zubin Master & Bryn Williams-Jones (2007). The Global Hla Banking of Embryonic Stem Cells Requires Further Scientific Justification. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (8):45 – 46.score: 432.0
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  29. Geron Ethics Advisory Board (forthcoming). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. Hastings Center Report.score: 432.0
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  30. Rebecca Dresser (2002). Embryonic Stem Cells: Expanding the Analysis. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):40 – 41.score: 432.0
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  31. H.-W. Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.score: 432.0
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  32. J. R. Meyer (2000). Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Respect for Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):166-170.score: 432.0
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  33. P. S. Copland (2004). The Roman Catholic Church and Embryonic Stem Cells. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):607-608.score: 432.0
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  34. Anna-Karin M. Andersson (2011). Embryonic Stem Cells and Property Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):221-242.score: 432.0
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  35. G. Badura-Lotter (2001). Ethical, Biological and Legal Aspects in the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Germany. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (2):38.score: 432.0
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  36. Maureen L. Condic & Edward J. Furton (2007). Harvesting Embryonic Stem Cells From Deceased Human Embryos. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (3):507-526.score: 432.0
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  37. Pablo Navarro & Philip Avner (2010). An Embryonic Story: Analysis of the Gene Regulative Network Controlling Xist Expression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. Bioessays 32 (7):581-588.score: 432.0
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  38. Sophie Bridge (2013). Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: An Alternative to Embryonic Stem Cells? Asian Bioethics Review 5 (1):25-39.score: 432.0
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  39. Hans-Werner Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.score: 432.0
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  40. Norman Ford (2000). Therapeutic Use of Pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 6 (1):11.score: 432.0
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  41. Alexandra L. Joyner (1991). Gene Targeting and Gene Trap Screens Using Embryonic Stem Cells: New Approaches to Mammalian Development. Bioessays 13 (12):649-656.score: 432.0
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  42. Karen Lebacqz, Michael M. Mendiola, Ted Peters, Ernlé W. D. Young & Laurie Zoloth‐Dorfman (1999). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. Hastings Center Report 29 (2):31-36.score: 432.0
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  43. M. M. Mendiola, T. Peters, E. W. Young & L. Zoloth-Dorfman (1999). Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations. By Geron Ethics Advisory Board. Hastings Center Report 29 (2):31.score: 432.0
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  44. Harold Morowitz (2003). Embryonic Stem Cells. Complexity 8 (3):10-11.score: 432.0
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  45. Christine Mummery (2007). Cardiomyocytes From Human Embryonic Stem Cells: More Than Heart Repair Alone. Bioessays 29 (6):572-579.score: 432.0
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  46. Fernando Miguel Pérez Herranz (2010). Gnoseología de Las «Células Madre Embrionarias»; Gnoseology of «Embryonic Stem Cells». Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 43:309 - 336.score: 432.0
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  47. Michel Revel (2010). Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cloning for Stem Cells. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (1):4-14.score: 432.0
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  48. Insoo Hyun (2008). Review of K. R. Monroe, R. B. Miller, and J. Tobis. Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical and Political Issues . Review of C. B. Cohen. Renewing the Stuff of Life: Stem Cells, Ethics, and Public Policy . Review of R. Korobkin with S. R. Munzer. Stem Cell Century: Law and Policy for a Breakthrough Technology. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):57 – 59.score: 423.0
  49. Maureen L. Condic, Samuel B. Condic & William B. Hurlbut (2005). Producing Non-Embryonic Organisms for Stem Cells. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (1).score: 423.0
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