Search results for 'Emergentism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. J. Lowe (2000). Causal Closure Principles and Emergentism. Philosophy 75 (294):571-586.score: 24.0
    Causal closure arguments against interactionist dualism are currently popular amongst physicalists. Such an argument appeals to some principles of the causal closure of the physical, together with certain other premises, to conclude that at least some mental events are identical with physical events. However, it is crucial to the success of any such argument that the physical causal closure principle to which it appeals is neither too strong nor too weak by certain standards. In this paper, it is argued that (...)
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  2. Olga Markič (2004). Causal Emergentism. Acta Analytica 19 (33):65-81.score: 24.0
    In this paper I describe basic features of traditional (British) emergentism and Popper’s emergentist theory of consciousness and compare them to the contemporary versions of emergentism present in connectionist approach in cognitive sciences. I argue that despite their similarities, the traditional form, as well as Popper’s theory belong to strong causal emergentism and yield radically different ontological consequences compared to the weaker, contemporary version present in cognitive science. Strong causal emergentism denies the causal closure of the (...)
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  3. Nicholas Schroeder (forthcoming). A Physicalistic Account of Emergentism. Axiomathes:1-16.score: 24.0
    Jaegwon Kim’s argument against non-reductive physicalism is well known. Many philosophers take Kim’s argument to also apply to emergentism. But this does not necessarily follow. In this paper, I will first briefly show why Kim’s argument against non-reductive physicalism need not apply to emergentism. Next, I will present a physicalistic account of emergentism offered by Jason Megill in his paper “A Defense of Emergence.” This will be followed by an examination of some of the limitations of Megill’s (...)
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  4. Godehard Brüntrup (1998). Is Psycho-Physical Emergentism Committed to Dualism? The Causal Efficacy of Emergent Mental Properties. Erkenntnis 3 (2):133-151.score: 21.0
  5. Philip Clayton (2010). Freedom, Consciousness, and Science: An Emergentist Response to the Challenge. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 985--998.score: 21.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * A Neuroscientific Theory of Cognition: The Global Workspace Model * The Burden of Proof and the Loss of Innocence * The Harshest Attack on Freedom and Consciousness: Daniel Dennett * A More Radical Entailment? * Consciousness as an Emergent Property * Conclusion * Notes.
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  6. Alvin F. Nelson (1969). Emergentism Reconsidered and an Alternative. Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):187-192.score: 21.0
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  7. Charles Taliaferro (2001). Emergentism and Consciousness: Going Beyond Property Dualism. In Soul, Body, and Survival: Essays on the Metaphysics of Human Persons. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  8. Achim Stephan (2002). Emergentism, Irreducibility, and Downward Causation. Grazer Philosophische Studien 65 (1):77-93.score: 18.0
    Several theories of emergence will be distinguished. In particular, these are synchronic, diachronic, and weak versions of emergence. While the weaker theories are compatible with property reductionism, synchronic emergentism and strong versions of diachronic emergentism are not. Synchronice mergentism is of particular interest for the discussion of downward causation. For such a theory, a system's property is taken to be emergent if it is irreducible, i.e., if it is not reductively explainable. Furthermore, we have to distinguish two different (...)
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  9. Kristina Musholt, Emergentism Revisited.score: 18.0
    The “explanatory gap” is proposed to be the “hard problem” of consciousness research and has generated a great deal of recent debate. Arguments brought forward to reveal this gap include the conceivability of zombies or the “super-neuroscientist” Mary. These are supposed to show that the facts of consciousness are not a priori entailed by the microphysical facts. Similar arguments were already proposed by emergence theories in the context of the debate between mechanism and vitalism. According to synchronic emergentism, the (...)
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  10. Carl Gillett (2006). Samuel Alexander's Emergentism. Synthese 153 (2):261-296.score: 18.0
    Samuel Alexander was one of the foremost philosophical figures of his day and has been argued by John Passmore to be one of ‘fathers’ of Australian philosophy as well as a novel kind of physicalist. Yet Alexander is now relatively neglected, his role in the genesis of Australian philosophy if far from widely accepted and the standard interpretation takes him to be an anti-physicalist. In this paper, I carefully examine these issues and show that Alexander has been badly, although understandably, (...)
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  11. Robert J. Howell (2009). Emergentism and Supervenience Physicalism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):83 – 98.score: 18.0
    A purely metaphysical formulation of physicalism is surprisingly elusive. One popular slogan is, 'There is nothing over and above the physical'. Problems with this arise on two fronts. First, it is difficult to explain what makes a property 'physical' without appealing to the methodology of physics or to particular ways in which properties are known. This obviously introduces epistemic features into the core of a metaphysical issue. Second, it is difficult to cash out 'over-and-aboveness' in a way that is rigorous, (...)
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  12. Dave Elder-Vass (2007). Luhmann and Emergentism: Competing Paradigms for Social Systems Theory? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):408-432.score: 18.0
    Social systems theory has been dominated in recent years by the work of Niklas Luhmann, but there is another strand of systems thinking, which is receiving increasing attention in sociology: emergentism. For emergentism, the core problems of systems thinking are concerned with causation and reductionism; for Luhmann, they are questions of meaning and self-reference. Arguing from an emergentist perspective, the article finds that emergentism addresses its own core problem successfully, while Luhmann's approach is incapable of resolving questions (...)
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  13. Kevin Morris (2014). Supervenience Physicalism, Emergentism, and the Polluted Supervenience Base. Erkenntnis 79 (2):351-365.score: 18.0
    A prominent objection to supervenience physicalism is that a definition of physicalism in terms of supervenience allows for physicalism to be compatible with nonphysicalist outlooks, such as certain forms of emergentism. I take as my starting point a recent defense of supervenience physicalism from this objection. According to this line of thought, the subvenient base for emergent properties cannot be said to be purely physical; rather, it is “polluted” with emergent features in virtue of necessarily giving rise to them. (...)
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  14. Michael A. Stadler & Peter Kruse (1994). Gestalt Theory and Synergetics: From Psychophysical Isomorphism to Holistic Emergentism. Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):211-226.score: 18.0
    Gestalt theory is discussed as one main precursor of synergetics, one of the most elaborated theories of self-organization. It is a precursor for two reasons: the Gestalt theoretical view of cognitive order-formation comes dose to the central ideas of self-organization. Furthermore both approaches have stressed the significance of non-linear perceptual processes (such as multistability) for the solution of the mind-brain problem. The question of whether Gestalt theory preferred a dualistic or a monistic view of the mind-body relation is answered in (...)
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  15. Luisa Damiano (2012). Co-Emergences in Life and Science: A Double Proposal for Biological Emergentism. [REVIEW] Synthese 185 (2):273-294.score: 18.0
    This article addresses the problem of emergence through a distinction, often neglected in the literature, between two different aspects of this issue: (1) the theoretical problem of providing modelizations able to explain the expression of emergent properties; (2) the epistemological problem of warranting the scientific value of the emergentist descriptions of nature. This paper considers this double issue with regard to the biological domain, and proposes a double solution (theoretical and epistemological) originally developed in early studies on self-organization. The underlying (...)
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  16. Dave Elder-Vass (2007). Reconciling Archer and Bourdieu in an Emergentist Theory of Action. Sociological Theory 25 (4):325 - 346.score: 18.0
    Margaret Archer and Pierre Bourdieu have advanced what seem at first sight to be incompatible theories of human agency. While Archer places heavy stress on conscious reflexive deliberation and the consequent choices of identity and projects that individuals make, Bourdieu's concept of habitus places equally heavy stress on the role of social conditioning in determining our behavior, and downplays the contribution of conscious deliberation. Despite this, I argue that these two approaches, with some modification, can be reconciled in a single (...)
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  17. Emanuele Ratti (2014). Levels of Abstraction, Emergentism and Artificial Life. Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence:1-12.score: 18.0
    I diagnose the current debate between epistemological and ontological emergentism as a Kantian antinomy, which has reasonable but irreconcilable thesis and antithesis. Kantian antinomies have recently returned to contemporary philosophy in part through the work of Luciano Floridi, and the method of levels of abstraction. I use a thought experiment concerning a computer simulation to show how to resolve the epistemological/ontological antinomy about emergence. I also use emergentism and simulations in artificial life to illuminate both levels of abstraction (...)
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  18. Philip Clayton & P. C. W. Davies (eds.) (2006). The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    This volume introduces readers to emergence theory, outlines the major arguments in its defence, and summarizes the most powerful objections against it. It provides the clearest explication yet of this exciting new theory of science, which challenges the reductionist approach by proposing the continuous emergence of novel phenomena.
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  19. Edward L. Schoen (2007). Philip Clayton and Paul Davies (Eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):119-121.score: 15.0
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  20. Philip Clayton (1999). Neuroscience, the Person, and God: An Emergentist Account. In Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Notre Dame: University Notre Dame Press. 613-652.score: 15.0
  21. Robert C. Koons (2003). Functionalism Without Physicalism: Outline of an Emergentist Program. Progress in Complexity, Information, and Design 2 (3-3).score: 15.0
    The historical association between functionalism and physicalism is not an unbreakable one. There are reasons for finding some version of a functional account of the mental attractive that are independent of the plausibility of physicalism. I develop a non-physicalist version of func- tionalism and explain how this model is able to secure genuine emergence of the mental, despite Kim’s arguments that such emergence theories are incoherent. The kind of teleological emergence of the mental required by this model is in fact (...)
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  22. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2010). Emergentist Monism, Biological Realism, Operations and Brain-Mind Problem. Physics of Life Reviews 7 (2):264-268.score: 15.0
    We would like to thank all the commentators who responded to our target review paper for their thought-provoking ideas and for their initially positive characterization of our theorizing. Our position provoked a broad range of reactions, from enthusiastic support to some kind of opposition. Regardless of the type of the response, one common factor appears to be the plausibility of a presented attempt to apply insights from physics, biology (neuroscience), and phenomenology of mind to form a unified theoretical framework of (...)
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  23. Bradford McCall (2011). The Reemergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. Edited by Philip Clayton and Paul Davies. Heythrop Journal 52 (2):319-320.score: 15.0
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  24. Timothy O'Connor (2003). Groundwork for an Emergentist Account of the Mental. Pcid 2.score: 15.0
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  25. Donald A. Crosby (2010). Emergentism, Perspectivism, and Divine Pathos. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (3):196-206.score: 15.0
    In his book Divine Beauty: The Aesthetics of Charles Hartshorne, Daniel A. Dombrowski performs a welcome service by bringing into clear focus a large number of the extensive writings of Hartshorne and relating them to the topic of aesthetics.1 In so doing, he shows how central Hartshorne’s analysis of aesthetic experience is to various aspects of his thought, including but by no means restricted to his views on the nature of art and the place of the arts in human life. (...)
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  26. William Hasker (1982). Emergentism. Religious Studies 18 (December):473-88.score: 15.0
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  27. A. M. Soto & C. Sonnenschein (2006). Emergentism by Default: A View From the Bench. [REVIEW] Synthese 151 (3):361-376.score: 15.0
    For the last 50 years the dominant stance in experimental biology has been reductionism in general, and genetic reductionism in particular. Philosophers were the first to realize that the belief that the Mendelian genes were reduced to DNA molecules was questionable. Soon, experimental data confirmed these misgivings. The optimism of molecular biologists, fueled by early success in tackling relatively simple problems has now been tempered by the difficulties encountered when applying the same simple ideas to complex problems. We analyze three (...)
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  28. Kenneth F. Schaffner (1998). Genes, Behavior, and Developmental Emergentism: One Process, Indivisible? Philosophy of Science 65 (2):209-252.score: 15.0
    The question of the influence of genes on behavior raises difficult philosophical and social issues. In this paper I delineate what I call the Developmentalist Challenge (DC) to assertions of genetic influence on behavior, and then examine the DC through an indepth analysis of the behavioral genetics of the nematode, C. elegans, with some briefer references to work on Drosophila. I argue that eight "rules" relating genes and behavior through environmentally-influenced and tangled neural nets capture the results of developmental and (...)
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  29. Olivier Sartenaer (2013). Neither Metaphysical Dichotomy nor Pure Identity. Clarifying the Emergentist Creed. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):365-373.score: 15.0
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  30. William Seager (2012). Emergentist Panpsychism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):9-10.score: 15.0
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  31. Scott F. Gilbert & Erik M. Jorgensen (1998). Wormwholes: A Commentary on K. F. Schaffner's "Genes, Behavior, and Developmental Emergentism". Philosophy of Science 65 (2):259-266.score: 15.0
    Although Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen and modified to be an organism that would facilitate a reductionist program for neurogenetics, recent research has provided evidence for properties that are emergent from the neurons. While neurogenetic advances have been made using C. elegans which may be useful in explaining human neurobiology, there are severe limitations on C. elegans to explain any significant human behavior.
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  32. Warren Shrader, John Stuart Mill and the Development of British Emergentism.score: 15.0
     
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  33. Mario De Caro (2010). 10 Is Emergentism Refuted by the Neurosciences? In Antonella Corradini & Timothy O'Connor (eds.), Emergence in Science and Philosophy. Routledge. 190.score: 15.0
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  34. Elly Vintiadis (2013). Why a Naturalist Should Be an Emergentist About the Mind. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):38-62.score: 15.0
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  35. F. L. Wells (1928). Psychogenic Factors in Emergentism and Allied Views. Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):71-75.score: 15.0
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  36. Robert N. Brandon & Grant Ramsey (2007). What's Wrong with the Emergentist Statistical Interpretation of Natural Selection and Random Drift. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press. 66--84.score: 15.0
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  37. Paul-Antoine Miquel (2007). Bergson and Darwin: From an Immanentist to an Emergentist Approach to Evolution. Substance 36 (3):42-56.score: 15.0
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  38. Paul-Antoine Miquel (2007). From an Immanentist to an Emergentist Approache to Evolution: Between Bergson and Darwin. Substance 114 (3):42-56.score: 15.0
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  39. Gerry T. M. Altmann (2010). Why Emergentist Accounts of Cognition Are More Theoretically Constraining Than Structured Probability Accounts: Comment on Griffiths Et Al. And McClelland Et Al. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):340.score: 15.0
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  40. George Hollich, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Michael L. Tucker & R. M. Golinkoff (2000). A Change is Afoot: Emergentist Thinking in Language Acquisition. In P. B. Andersen, Claus Emmeche, N. O. Finnemann & P. V. Christiansen (eds.), Downward Causation. University of Aarhus Press.score: 15.0
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  41. Jaegwon Kim (1992). "Downward Causation" in Emergentism and Nonreductive Physicalism. In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter. 119--138.score: 15.0
     
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  42. Ana M. Soto & Carlos Sonnenschein (2006). Emergentism by Default: A View From the Bench. Synthese 151 (3):361-376.score: 15.0
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  43. Donato Bergandi (2011). Multifaceted Ecology Between Organicism, Emergentism and Reductionism. In A. Schwarz & K. Jax (eds.), Ecology Revisited. Reflecting on Concepts, Advancing Science. Springer.score: 15.0
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  44. C. D. Broad (1999). Mechanism and Emergentism. In Jaegwon Kim & Ernest Sosa (eds.), Metaphysics: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers. 487--498.score: 15.0
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  45. Arthur L. Caplan (1981). Pick Your Poison: Historicism, Essentialism, and Emergentism in the Definition of Species. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):285.score: 15.0
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  46. Antonella Corradini (2008). 1. Monism in British Emergentism. In Alessandro Antonietti, Antonella Corradini & E. Jonathan Lowe (eds.), Psycho-Physical Dualism Today: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Lexington Books. 185.score: 15.0
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  47. Sean Creaven (2007). Emergentist Marxism: Dialectical Philosophy and Social Theory. Routledge.score: 15.0
  48. Michele Di Francesco (2010). 4 Two Varieties of Causal Emergentism. In Antonella Corradini & Timothy O'Connor (eds.), Emergence in Science and Philosophy. Routledge. 64.score: 15.0
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  49. Michele Di Francesco (2005). Filling the Gap, or Jumping Over It? Emergentism and Naturalism. Epistemologia 28 (1):93-120.score: 15.0
     
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  50. J. Goldstein (forthcoming). The Past is Not What It Used to Be: An Introduction to GH Mead's Radical Emergentism. Emergence: Complexity and Organization.score: 15.0
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