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  1.  67
    Emilio Mordini (2014). Considering the Human Implications of New and Emerging Technologies in the Area of Human Security. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):617-638.
    IntroductionThis special issue of Science and Engineering Ethics is devoted to the ethical, societal and political implications of new and emerging technologies in the area of Human Security. Its aim is to address the wider implications of an altered security landscape. Specifically, and in accordance with SEE’s main area of interest, contributions to this special issue focus on those ethical considerations warranted by scientific and technological advances in the field of human security. This includes, but is not restricted to, issues (...)
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  2.  3
    Thomas E. Novotny, Emilio Mordini, Ruth Chadwick, J. Martin Pedersen, Fabrizio Fabbri, Reidar K. Lie, Natapong Thanachaiboot, Elias Mossialos & Govin Permanand, Bioethical Implications of Globalization: An International Consortium Project of the European Commission.
    The term “globalization” was popularized by Marshall McLuhan in War and Peace in the Global Village. In the book, McLuhan described how the global media shaped current events surrounding the Vietnam War [1] and also predicted how modern information and communication technologies would accelerate world progress through trade and knowledge development. Globalization now refers to a broad range of issues regarding the movement of goods and services through trade liberalization, and the movement of people through migration. Much has also been (...)
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  3.  7
    Emilio Mordini, David Wright, Kush Wadhwa, Paul Hert, Eugenio Mantovani, Jesper Thestrup, Guido Steendam, Antonio D'Amico & Ira Vater (2009). Senior Citizens and the Ethics of E-Inclusion. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):203-220.
    The ageing society poses significant challenges to Europes economy and society. In coming to grips with these issues, we must be aware of their ethical dimensions. (...)Values are the heart of the European Union, as Article 1a of the Lisbon Treaty makes clear: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity…”. The notion of Europe as a community of values has various important implications, including the development of inclusion policies. A special case of exclusion concerns the gap between those people with effective access to digital and information technology and those without access to it, thedigital divide”, which in Europe is chiefly age-related. Policies to overcome the digital divide and, more generally speaking, e-inclusion policies addressing the ageing population raise some ethical problems. Among younger senior citizens, say those between 65 and 80 years old, the main issues are likely to be universal access to ICT and e-participation. Among the older senior citizens, say those more than 80 years old, the main issues are mental and physical deterioration and assistive technology. An approach geared towards the protection of human rights could match the different needs of senior citizens and provide concrete guidance to evaluate information technologies for them. (shrink)
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  4.  9
    Emilio Mordini, David Wright, Paul de Hert, Eugenio Mantovani, Kush R. Wadhwa, Jesper Thestrup & Guido van Steendam (2009). Ethics, E-Inclusion and Ageing. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (1).
    Ethical questions about information and communications technologies have been debated since World War II. Western democracies have had more than 50 years of experience in addressing and organising the ethical, social and legal aspects of scientific and technological developments. However, this expertise, tradition and experience are not enough to manage the most urgent ethical and social issues and contemporary challenges involving ICT. A systematic and institutional organisation of social values in the context of modern ICT tools is needed.This paper focuses (...)
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  5.  18
    Emilio Mordini & Sonia Massari (2008). Body, Biometrics and Identity. Bioethics 22 (9):488-498.
    According to a popular aphorism, biometrics are turning the human body into a passport or a password. As usual, aphorisms say more than they intend. Taking the dictum seriously, we would be two: ourself and our body. Who are we, if we are not our body? And what is our body without us? The endless history of identification systems teaches that identification is not a trivial fact but always involves a web of economic interests, political relations, symbolic networks, narratives and (...)
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  6.  25
    Emilio Mordini, David Wright, Kush Wadhwa, Paul De Hert, Eugenio Mantovani, Jesper Thestrup, Guido Van Steendam, Antonio D’Amico & Ira Vater (2009). Senior Citizens and the Ethics of E-Inclusion. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):203-220.
    The ageing society poses significant challenges to Europe’s economy and society. In coming to grips with these issues, we must be aware of their ethical dimensions. Values are the heart of the European Union, as Article 1a of the Lisbon Treaty makes clear: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity…”. The notion of Europe as a community of values has various important implications, including the development of inclusion policies. A special case of exclusion concerns the (...)
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  7.  8
    Emilio Mordini (2011). Pulcinella secrets. Bioethics 25 (9):ii-iii.
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  8.  6
    Emilio Mordini (2005). Biowarfare as a Biopolitical Icon. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):242-255.
    Nuclear warfare threat has been one of the main driver for cultural, political, economical and social changes in the late twentieth century, biological warfare threat is about to take it over. However, while nuclear warfare was a concrete possibility, biological warfare is just an elusive risk. This paper will explore some reasons for this apparent inconsistency by discussing biowarfare from a symbolic point of view, looking for its inner meanings and philosophical implications.
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  9. Emilio Mordini (1997). Commentary on" The Stoic Conception of Mental Disorder". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):297-301.