Search results for 'Emily A. Ronning' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  48
    Melissa S. Anderson, Emily A. Ronning, Raymond De Vries & Brian C. Martinson (2007). The Perverse Effects of Competition on Scientists' Work and Relationships. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):437-461.
    Competition among scientists for funding, positions and prestige, among other things, is often seen as a salutary driving force in U.S. science. Its effects on scientists, their work and their relationships are seldom considered. Focus-group discussions with 51 mid- and early-career scientists, on which this study is based, reveal a dark side of competition in science. According to these scientists, competition contributes to strategic game-playing in science, a decline in free and open sharing of information and methods, sabotage of others’ (...)
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  2. Dale Dinnel, John A. Glover & Royce R. Ronning (1984). A Provisional Model of Mathematical Problem Solving. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (5):459-462.
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  3. A. Largent Emily, G. Miller Franklin & Steven Joffe (2013). A Prescription for Ethical Learning. In Mildred Z. Solomon & Ann Bonham (eds.), Ethical Oversight of Learning Health Care Systems. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  4.  1
    Royce R. Ronning (1965). Anagram Solution Times: A Function of the "Ruleout" Factor. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (1):35.
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  5. M. -L. Kearney & A. H. Ronning (1997). Women and the University Curriculum: Towards Equality, Democracy and Peace. British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (3):315-317.
     
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  6.  45
    Alan Sokal, Beyond the Hoax : A Response to Emily A. Schultz.
    For the complex or boundary objects in which I am interested . . . dimensions implode . . . they collapse into each other . . . story telling . . . is a fraught practice . . . In no way is story telling opposed to materiality, [sic] But materiality itself is tropic; it makes us swerve, it trips us; it is a knot of the textual, technical, mythic/oneric [sic], organic, political and economic.
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  7. Phyllis Marie Jensen (2015). Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land: A Jungian Portrait. Routledge.
    Emily Carr, often called Canada’s Van Gogh, was a post-impressionist explorer, artist and writer. In _Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land_ Phyllis Marie Jensen draws on analytical psychology and the theories of feminism and social constructionism for insights into Carr’s life in the late Victorian period and early twentieth century. Presented in two parts, the book introduces Carr’s émigré English family and childhood on the "edge of nowhere" and her art education in San Francisco, London (...)
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  8.  2
    Shé M. Hawke (2015). Review of Breathing with Luce Irigaray, Edited by Emily A. Holmes and Lenart Škof. [REVIEW] Sophia 54 (4):603-605.
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  9.  11
    J. M. Mossman (1991). Emily A. McDermott: Euripides' Medea: The Incarnation of Disorder. Pp. Ix + 156. London, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1989 $19.75. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):221-222.
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  10.  1
    Joel Sherzer (1994). Emily A. Schultz., Dialogue at the Margins. Whorf, Bakhtin, and Linguistic Relativity. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):146-147.
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  11.  4
    Thomas M. Lennon (2015). Unmoved: A Rejoinder to Emily Thomas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):763-774.
    i began my “eleatic descartes” with a reminder of, what nobody denies, that Descartes is a convinced mechanist. Therefore, he must, in some sense, recognize motion. No less widely accepted is that Descartes is a plenum theorist. The main argument of the Eleatic interpretation is that given his articulation of the corporeal plenum in part two of the Principles, he cannot recognize motion by conceiving of it as real. And, because motion is what individuates bodies, there cannot be a multiplicity (...)
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  12.  5
    Emily E. Anderson (2012). Review of Marion Danis, Emily Largent, David Wendler, Sara Chandros Hull, Seema Shah, Joseph Millum, Benjamin Berkman, and Christine Grady,Research Ethics Consultation: A Casebook1. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):54-55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 54-55, October 2012.
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  13.  2
    Lauren Vanderhurst (2011). “A Prison Gets to Be a Friend”: Emily Dickinson, Agoraphobia and Introspection. Emergence: A Journal of Undergraduate Literary Criticism and Creative Research 2.
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  14. Joseph A. Bracken, Rémi Brague, J. Budziszewski & Stratford Caldecott (2009). An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Bedau, Mark A., and Emily C. Parke, Eds. The Ethics of Protocells: Moral and Social Implications of Creating Life in the Laboratory. Cambridge, Mass. And London: MIT Press, 2009. Pp. X+ 368. Paper $28.00, ISBN: 978-0-262-51269-5. [REVIEW] American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (3).
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  15. Robert Krause (2006). Book Review: Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation From Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 13 (3):328-329.
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  16. John Barton (2013). Book Review: Emily Arndt, Demanding Our Attention: The Hebrew Bible as a Source for Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (4):507-509.
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  17.  52
    Anne Dawson (2011). Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834. By Emily Clark. Heythrop Journal 52 (5):872-873.
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  18.  8
    Cyril Bailey (1927). Juno: A Study in Early Roman Religion. By Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin, Smith College, U.S.A. (Smith College Classical Studies, No. 7.) Pp. Iv+74. Northampton, Massachusetts, May, 1926. 75 Cents. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):43-.
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  19. Mary Domski (2006). Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson. Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  20.  8
    J. Hainsworth (1997). Review. The Ages of Homer. A Tribute to Emily Townsend Vermeule. JB Carter, SP Morris. The Classical Review 47 (1):4-6.
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  21.  8
    Michael Bernhard, Alya Guseva & Carol Johnson (2005). Emily Barman is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. She is Currently Working on a Book Entitled Contesting Communities: The Transformation of Workplace Charity. Her Research Interests Include the Study of the Nonprofit Sector, Economic Sociology, and Organizational Analysis. She is Also Analyzing the Uses of Tempo. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 34:105-107.
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  22.  22
    Jason Boaz Simus (2007). A Response to Emily Brady's 'Aesthetic Regard for Nature in Environmental and Land Art'. Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (3):301 – 305.
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  23. Helen Cary Chadwick (1929). Emily Dickinson: A Study. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 10 (4):256.
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  24. Aïssatou Mbodj-Pouye (2013). Emily Lynn Osborn, Our New Husbands Are Here. Households, Gender, and Politics in a West African State from the Slave Trade to Colonial Rule. Clio 1:273-273.
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  25. Solveig C. Robinson (2014). Wounded: A New History of the Western Front in World War I by Emily Mayhew. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (3):443-447.
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  26. William Sacksteder (1951). Book Review:From the Wagner Act to Taft-Hartley: A Study of National Labor Policy and Labor Relations. Harry A. Millis, Emily Clark Brown. [REVIEW] Ethics 62 (1):65-.
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  27. John R. Williams (2015). Sexual Ethics: A Theological Introduction. By Todd A. Salzman and Michael G. Lawler. Pp. Xxix, 250, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2012, $18.75. An Argument for Same‐Sex Marriage: Religious Freedom, Sexual Freedom and Public Expressions of Civic Equality . By Emily R. Gill. Pp. X, 276, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2012, $20.75. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (5):876-878.
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  28.  8
    Emily A. Butler & Ashley K. Randall (2013). Author Reply: Coregulation is a State of a Temporal Interpersonal Emotion System. Emotion Review 5 (2):213-214.
    People in an emotional exchange form a temporal interpersonal emotion system (TIES), in which their emotions are interconnected over time (Butler, 2011). These systems can be in various states, defined by the pattern of emotional interconnections. We have defined coregulation as one such state involving coupled dampened oscillations between partners’ emotions that converge on a stable level. Coregulation could be distinguished from other states, such as stress buffering, by comparing statistical models that represent the theoretical distinctions between states. Optimal data (...)
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  29.  3
    Haley A. Vlach, Lauren Krogh, Emily E. Thom & Catherine M. Sandhofer (2010). Doing with Development: Moving Toward a Complete Theory of Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):227-228.
    Machery proposes that the construct of detracts from research progress. However, ignoring development also detracts from research progress. Developmental research has advanced our understanding of how concepts are acquired and thus is essential to a complete theory. We propose a framework that both accounts for development and holds great promise as a new direction for thinking about concepts.
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  30.  4
    Tania Pouwhare & Emily Grabham (2008). “It's Another Way Of Making A Really Big Fuss” Human Rights And Women's Activism In The United Kingdom: An Interview With Tania Pouwhare. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):97-112.
    Following the “Encountering Human Rights” conference in January 2007, Emily Grabham interviewed Tania Pouwhare, a women’s rights activist working at the Women’s Resource Centre in London. Their discussion engaged with the professionalisation of activism, funding constraints and New Labour policies and their impact on immigrant women. Against a background of financial insecurity and huge demand for their services, many women’s organisations in the United Kingdom struggle to use human rights law to advance women’s rights. Nevertheless, the rhetoric of human (...)
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  31.  6
    Emily A. Austin (2016). Plato on Grief as a Mental Disorder. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 98 (1):1-20.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 98 Heft: 8 Seiten: 1-20.
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  32.  3
    Emily A. Largent & Steven D. Pearson (2012). Which Orphans Will Find a Home? The Rule of Rescue in Resource Allocation for Rare Diseases. Hastings Center Report 42 (1):27-34.
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  33.  2
    Emily A. Largent, Franklin G. Miller & Steven Joffe (2013). A Prescription for Ethical Learning. Hastings Center Report 43 (s1):28-29.
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  34.  2
    A. H. Antommaria & Emily A. Thorell (2011). Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions to Limit the Transmission of a Pandemic Virus: The Need for Complementary Programs to Address Children's Diverse Needs. Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (1):25.
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  35.  3
    Emily A. Zakin (1993). Feminism Without Women: Culture and Criticism in a “Postfeminist” Age. By Tania Modleski. New York: Routledge, 1991. Hypatia 8 (4):164-173.
  36.  1
    Emily A. Daniels (2010). A Review of “Diversity and Education: Teachers, Teaching and Teacher Education”. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 46 (4):438-442.
  37.  5
    Lawrence O. Gostin & Emily A. Mok (2010). Innovative Solutions to Closing the Health Gap Between Rich and Poor: A Special Symposium on Global Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):451-458.
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  38. Lawrence O. Gostin & Emily A. Mok (2010). Innovative Solutions to Closing the Health Gap Between Rich and Poor: A Special Symposium on Global Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):451-458.
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  39. Emily A. Holmes (2013). The Gift of Breath: Towards a Maternal. In Lenart Škof (ed.), Breathing with Luce Irigaray. Bloomsbury 36.
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  40. Emily A. McDermott (forthcoming). Medea Line 37: A Note. American Journal of Philology.
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  41. Maureen B. Adams (2000). Emily Brontë and Dogs: Transformation Within the Human-Dog Bond. Society and Animals 8 (2):167-181.
    This paper examines the bond between humans and dogs as demonstrated in the life and work of Emily Brontë . The nineteenth century author, publishing under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, evinced, both in her personal and professional life, the complex range of emotions explicit in the human-dog bond: attachment and companionship to domination and abuse. In Wuthering Heights, Brontë portrays the dog as scapegoat, illustrating the dark side of the bond found in many cultures. Moreover, she writes with awareness (...)
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  42. Gay L. Gullickson (2008). Emily Wilding Davison: Secular Martyr? Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (2):461-484.
    In 1913, the British suffragette Emily Wilding Davison was killed when she ran onto the race course at Epsom Downs during the running of the Derby. Davison's goals are unclear, but she was immediately hailed as a martyr to the women's cause by her comrades in the Women's Social and Political Union. Others denounced her as a suicidal fanatic. This article evaluates Davison's death by examining the WSPU's emphasis on self-sacrifice, the actions of other women who risked their lives (...)
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  43.  20
    John Ryan, Process Philosophy and the Text-Image Interface: A Study of Three Western Australian Botanical Illustrators.
    Botanical illustration combines scientific knowledge and artistic technique. However, whereas illustrated botanical images record static visual qualities, such as form and color, written botanical narratives supply crucial sensory, ecological, historical, and cultural contexts that complement visual representation. Understanding the text-image interface—where images and words intersect—contributes to humanities-based analyses of botanical illustration and illustrators. More specifically, a process philosophy perspective reveals the extent to which botanical representations engage the temporality, cyclicality, and contextuality of the living plants being illustrated. This article takes (...)
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  44.  54
    Eva Feder Kittay (2010). Planning a Trip to Italy, Arriving in Holland: The Delusion of Choice in Planning a Family. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):9-24.
    The title of this paper deserves an explanation—or rather two explanations, one for the portion preceding the colon, the other for that following as the subtitle. The first part is derived from a short essay by Emily Perl Kingsley, written in 1987 in response to questions she had received about what it is like to raise a child with Down Syndrome.1 Kingsley suggests that planning for a child is like planning a trip to some wonderful destination—in her example, Italy. (...)
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  45.  24
    John Coggon (2013). The Wonder of Euthanasia: A Debate That's Being Done to Death. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):401-419.
    In their book Debating Euthanasia, Emily Jackson and John Keown present respectively arguments in favour of and against the legalization of (some instances of) euthanasia and assisted suicide. Jackson advances a case based on a principled commitment to a secular, liberal legal system, arguing that obligations rooted in compassion require the careful development of laws to permit assisted dying. Keown defends the status quo, arguing that the law ought to sustain a prohibition against assisted dying, both out of a (...)
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  46.  8
    Alisa Gaunder (2011). Win Win's Struggles with the Institutional Transfer of the Emily's List Model to Japan: The Role of Accountability and Policy. Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (1):75-94.
    This article addresses the complexities of institutional transfer by exploring the case of EMILY's List and WIN WIN, two women's organizations in the US and Japan respectively that seek to increase the number of women in office by providing funds early in candidatescultures of giving’ exist, they do not necessarily preclude the success of an EMILY's List-type organization in Japan. Instead, WIN WIN made significant strategic organizational decisions that have impeded its ability to have a significant impact on (...)
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  47.  5
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
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  48.  4
    Jennifer A. Dobson, Emily Christofides, Melinda Solomon, Valerie Waters & Kieran O’Doherty (2015). How Do Young People with Cystic Fibrosis Conceptualize the Distinction Between Research and Treatment? A Qualitative Interview Study. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 6 (4):1-11.
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  49.  2
    Emily R. Barnes, Laurie A. Theeke & Jennifer Mallow (2015). Impact of the Provider and Healthcare Team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines Intervention on Adherence to National Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines in a Primary Care Centre. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (2):300-306.
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  50.  1
    Sandra M. Gilbert (1985). Life's Empty Pack: Notes Toward a Literary Daughteronomy. Critical Inquiry 11 (3):355.
    A definition of [George] Eliot as renunciatory culture-mother may seem an odd preface to a discussion of Silas Marner since, of all her novels, this richly constructed work is the one in which the empty pack of daughterhood appears fullest, the honey of femininity most unpunished. I want to argue, however, that this “legendary tale,” whose status as a schoolroom classic makes it almost as much a textbook as a novel, examines the relationship between woman’s fate and the structure of (...)
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