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  1. Eric Racine, Emily Bell, Natalie Zizzo & Courtney Green (forthcoming). Public Discourse on the Biology of Alcohol Addiction: Implications for Stigma, Self-Control, Essentialism, and Coercive Policies in Pregnancy. Neuroethics:1-10.
    International media have reported cases of pregnant women who have had their children apprehended by social services, or who were incarcerated or forced into treatment programs based on a history of substance use or lack of adherence to addiction treatment programs. Public discourse on the biology of addiction has been criticized for generating stigma and a diminished perception of self-control in individuals with an addiction, potentially contributing to coercive approaches and criminalization of women who misuse substances during pregnancy. We explored (...)
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  2. Emily Bell (2015). A Room with a View of Integrity and Professionalism: Personal Reflections on Teaching Responsible Conduct of Research in the Neurosciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):461-469.
    Neuroscientists are increasingly put into situations which demand critical reflection about the ethical and appropriate use of research tools and scientific knowledge. Students or trainees also have to know how to navigate the ethical domains of this context. At a time when neuroscience is expected to advance policy and practice outcomes, in the face of academic pressures and complex environments, the importance of scientific integrity comes into focus and with it the need for training at the graduate level in the (...)
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  3. Emily Bell, Natalie Zizzo & Eric Racine (2015). Caution! Warning Labels About Alcohol and Pregnancy: Unintended Consequences and Questionable Effectiveness. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):18-20.
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  4. Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana & Laura Macdonald (2014). Beyond Consent in Research: Revisiting Vulnerability in Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
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  5. Emily Bell, Veljko Dubljevic & Eric Racine (2013). Nudging Without Ethical Fudging: Clarifying Physician Obligations to Avoid Ethical Compromise. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):18-19.
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  6. Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more animal (...)
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  7. Nicole Palmour, William Affleck, Emily Bell, Constance Deslauriers, Bruce Pike, Julien Doyon & Eric Racine (2011). Informed Consent for MRI and fMRI Research: Analysis of a Sample of Canadian Consent Documents. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):1.
    BackgroundResearch ethics and the measures deployed to ensure ethical oversight of research are vested with extremely important ethical and practical goals. Accordingly, these measures need to function effectively in real-world research and to follow high level standards.MethodsWe examined approved consent forms for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies approved by Canadian research ethics boards .ResultsWe found evidence of variability in consent forms in matters of physical and psychological risk reporting. Approaches used to tackle the emerging issue of (...)
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  8. Emily Bell, Bruce Maxwell, Mary Pat McAndrews, Abbas Sadikot & Eric Racine (2010). Hope and Patients' Expectations in Deep Brain Stimulation: Healthcare Providers' Perspectives and Approaches. Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (2):112.
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  9. Emily Bell & Eric Racine (2010). Deep Brain Stimulation, Ethics, and Society. Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (2):101.
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  10. Eric Racine, Emily Bell & Constance Deslauriers (2010). Canadian Research Ethics Boards and Multisite Research: Experiences From Two Minimal-Risk Studies. Irb: Ethics and Human Research 32 (3):12-18.
    Canada’s Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans mandates that all research involving human subjects be reviewed and approved by a research ethics board . We have little evidence on how researchers are dealing with this requirement in multisite studies, which involve more than one REB. We retrospectively examined 22 REB submissions for two minimal-risk, multisite studies in leading Canadian institutions. Most REBs granted expedited review to the studies, while one declared the application to be exempt from review. (...)
     
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  11. Emily Bell & Eric Racine (2009). Enthusiasm for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Fmri) Often Overlooks its Dependence on Task Selection and Performance. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):23 – 25.
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  12. Eric Racine & Emily Bell (2008). Clinical and Public Translation of Neuroimaging Research in Disorders of Consciousness Challenges Current Diagnostic and Public Understanding Paradigms. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):13 – 15.