Search results for 'Emily Burdett' (try it on Scholar)

995 found
Order:
  1.  41
    Emma Cohen, Emily Burdett, Nicola Knight & Justin Barrett (2011). Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences in Person-Body Reasoning: Experimental Evidence From the United Kingdom and Brazilian Amazon. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1282-1304.
    We report the results of a cross-cultural investigation of person-body reasoning in the United Kingdom and northern Brazilian Amazon (Marajó Island). The study provides evidence that directly bears upon divergent theoretical claims in cognitive psychology and anthropology, respectively, on the cognitive origins and cross-cultural incidence of mind-body dualism. In a novel reasoning task, we found that participants across the two sample populations parsed a wide range of capacities similarly in terms of the capacities’ perceived anchoring to bodily function. Patterns of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  13
    Charles Burdett (2003). Italian Fascism and Utopia. History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):93-108.
    Considering a number of recent works on the ideology and culture of Fascism, the article explores how the concept of utopia, as formulated by different thinkers, can prove useful in attempting to unlock some of the mechanisms through which Fascism sought to manipulate the imagination and the aspirations of Italians. It focuses on the written accounts of writers and journalists who reported on the supposed achievements of the regime both in Italy and in the newly established colonies. It examines the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  8
    Richard Burdett & Kathryn Firth (2001). Thames Barrier Park: A Catalyst for Urban Regeneration. Topos 35:54-62.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    Poon Wai Yee Emily (2005). The Cultural Transfer In Legal Translation. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 18 (3-4):307-323.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  3
    Carolyn Burdett (2009). The Burke–Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy. Intellectual History Review 19 (1):153-154.
  6. Carolyn Burdett (1992). Thrown Together: Olive Schreiner, Writing and Politics. In Kate Campbell (ed.), Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press 107.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. A. Largent Emily, G. Miller Franklin & Steven Joffe (2013). A Prescription for Ethical Learning. In Mildred Z. Solomon & Ann Bonham (eds.), Ethical Oversight of Learning Health Care Systems. Wiley-Blackwell
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Michael Emily (2003). John Wyclif on Body and Mind. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Ben Kimpel (1981). Emily Dickinson as Philosopher. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Maureen B. Adams (2000). Emily Brontë and Dogs: Transformation Within the Human-Dog Bond. Society and Animals 8 (2):167-181.
    This paper examines the bond between humans and dogs as demonstrated in the life and work of Emily Brontë . The nineteenth century author, publishing under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, evinced, both in her personal and professional life, the complex range of emotions explicit in the human-dog bond: attachment and companionship to domination and abuse. In Wuthering Heights, Brontë portrays the dog as scapegoat, illustrating the dark side of the bond found in many cultures. Moreover, she writes with awareness (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Gay L. Gullickson (2008). Emily Wilding Davison: Secular Martyr? Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (2):461-484.
    In 1913, the British suffragette Emily Wilding Davison was killed when she ran onto the race course at Epsom Downs during the running of the Derby. Davison's goals are unclear, but she was immediately hailed as a martyr to the women's cause by her comrades in the Women's Social and Political Union. Others denounced her as a suicidal fanatic. This article evaluates Davison's death by examining the WSPU's emphasis on self-sacrifice, the actions of other women who risked their lives (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  32
    Robert Young (2013). 'Debating the Morality and Legality of Medically Assisted Dying'. Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown, Debating Euthanasia. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2012. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):151-160.
    In this Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown’s Debating Euthanasia , the respective lines of argument put forward by each contributor are set out and the key debating points identified. Particular consideration is given to the points each contributor makes concerning the sanctity of human life and whether slippery slopes leading from voluntary medically assisted dying to non-voluntary euthanasia would be established if voluntary medically assisted dying were to be legalised. Finally, consideration is given to the positions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  8
    Alisa Gaunder (2011). Win Win's Struggles with the Institutional Transfer of the Emily's List Model to Japan: The Role of Accountability and Policy. Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (1):75-94.
    This article addresses the complexities of institutional transfer by exploring the case of EMILY's List and WIN WIN, two women's organizations in the US and Japan respectively that seek to increase the number of women in office by providing funds early in candidatescultures of giving’ exist, they do not necessarily preclude the success of an EMILY's List-type organization in Japan. Instead, WIN WIN made significant strategic organizational decisions that have impeded its ability to have a significant impact on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Abi Curtis (2013). MUSHROOMING: Resistance and Creativity in Sigmund Freud and Emily Dickinson. Angelaki 18 (2):29 - 44.
    (2013). MUSHROOMING: resistance and creativity in sigmund freud and emily dickinson. Angelaki: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 29-44.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  5
    Emily E. Anderson (2012). Review of Marion Danis, Emily Largent, David Wendler, Sara Chandros Hull, Seema Shah, Joseph Millum, Benjamin Berkman, and Christine Grady,Research Ethics Consultation: A Casebook1. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):54-55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 54-55, October 2012.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Phyllis Marie Jensen (2015). Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land: A Jungian Portrait. Routledge.
    Emily Carr, often called Canada’s Van Gogh, was a post-impressionist explorer, artist and writer. In _Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land_ Phyllis Marie Jensen draws on analytical psychology and the theories of feminism and social constructionism for insights into Carr’s life in the late Victorian period and early twentieth century. Presented in two parts, the book introduces Carr’s émigré English family and childhood on the "edge of nowhere" and her art education in San Francisco, London (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Patrick J. Keane (2008). Emily Dickinson's Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering. University of Missouri.
    As much a doubter as a believer, Emily Dickinson often expressed views about God in general—and God with respect to suffering in particular. In many of her poems, she contemplates the question posed by countless theologians and poets before her: how can one reconcile a benevolent deity with evil in the world? Examining Dickinson’s perspectives on the role played by a supposedly omnipotent and all-loving God in a world marked by violence and pain, Patrick Keane initially focuses on her (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Robert Krause (2006). Book Review: Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation From Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 13 (3):328-329.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. John Barton (2013). Book Review: Emily Arndt, Demanding Our Attention: The Hebrew Bible as a Source for Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (4):507-509.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  52
    Anne Dawson (2011). Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834. By Emily Clark. Heythrop Journal 52 (5):872-873.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  39
    Gareth B. Matthews New, Andrew R. Bailey, Sarah Buss, Steven M. Cahn, Howard Caygill, David J. Chalmers, John Christman, Michael Clark, David E. Cooper & Simon Critchley (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):403.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  10
    Arthur W. Frank (2004). Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  11
    Greg Johnson (1982). Emily Dickinson. Renascence 35 (1):2-15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    Adam Katz (2015). Suñña at the Bone: Emily Dickinson’s Theravadin Romanticism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 35 (1):111-119.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  15
    Paula Kurth (1929). Emily Dickinson in Her Letters. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):430-439.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  4
    Thomas M. Lennon (2015). Unmoved: A Rejoinder to Emily Thomas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):763-774.
    i began my “eleatic descartes” with a reminder of, what nobody denies, that Descartes is a convinced mechanist. Therefore, he must, in some sense, recognize motion. No less widely accepted is that Descartes is a plenum theorist. The main argument of the Eleatic interpretation is that given his articulation of the corporeal plenum in part two of the Principles, he cannot recognize motion by conceiving of it as real. And, because motion is what individuates bodies, there cannot be a multiplicity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  8
    Cyril Bailey (1927). Juno: A Study in Early Roman Religion. By Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin, Smith College, U.S.A. (Smith College Classical Studies, No. 7.) Pp. Iv+74. Northampton, Massachusetts, May, 1926. 75 Cents. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):43-.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  19
    Lewis Leary (1956). The Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):286-290.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  45
    Alan Sokal, Beyond the Hoax : A Response to Emily A. Schultz.
    For the complex or boundary objects in which I am interested . . . dimensions implode . . . they collapse into each other . . . story telling . . . is a fraught practice . . . In no way is story telling opposed to materiality, [sic] But materiality itself is tropic; it makes us swerve, it trips us; it is a knot of the textual, technical, mythic/oneric [sic], organic, political and economic.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  2
    Shé M. Hawke (2015). Review of Breathing with Luce Irigaray, Edited by Emily A. Holmes and Lenart Škof. [REVIEW] Sophia 54 (4):603-605.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  33
    Seth Lazar (2011). War: Essays in Political Philosophy, Edited by Larry May with Emily Crookston. Mind 120 (479):895-901.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Mary Domski (2006). Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson. Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  35.  36
    Gary Ostertag (2011). Emily Elizabeth Constance Jones. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  7
    Sally Borbasi (2001). Being, Seeking and Telling: Expressive Approaches to Qualitative Adult Education Research, Edited by Peter Willis, Robert Smith and Emily Collins: Book Review. [REVIEW] Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 1 (1).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  4
    Caroline Bruzelius (2015). Taryn E. L. Chubb and Emily Kelley, Eds., Mendicants and Merchants in the Medieval Mediterranean. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012. Paper. Pp. Iv, 149. $68. ISBN: 9789-0042-4976-9. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (2):525-526.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  12
    A. Souter (1936). Sister Mary Emily Keenan: The Life and Times of St. Augustine as Revealed in His Letters. Pp. Xx + 221. (The Catholic University of America Patristic Studies, Vol. XLV.) Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America, 1935. Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):39-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  8
    Glenn Hughes (2014). Love, Terror, and Transcendence in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry. Renascence 66 (4):283-304.
    Drawing on a large number of Dickinson’s poems, this essay explores the poetic originality, depth of insight, and extremes of emotional experience in those poems in which she articulates her relationship with a mystery of divinely transcendent being. Although Dickinson definitively rejected the institutional Christianity of her time and place, she employed the religious language and symbols of Christianity to express in a profoundly idiosyncratic way her recurrent experiences of sacred or divine transcendence. In these poems her articulation both of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  6
    Mario D'Avanzo (1967). Emily Dickinson's "Dying Eye". Renascence 19 (2):110-111.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    René Descartes & Ob Meditations (2006). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):391.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  5
    Shira Wolosky (2006). Emily Dickinson: Reclusion Against Itself. Common Knowledge 12 (3):443-459.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  9
    Sabine Valici (1996). Giovanna FIUME (dir.), Madri, Storia di un ruolo sociale, Marsilio. 1995, 326 p. Textes de Valeria Ando, Gianna Pomata, Giovanna Fiume, Emily Martin, Marina d'Amelia, Giulia Calvi, Maria Fubini Leuzzi, Marilena Modica, Giorgia Alessi, Nancy Triolo, Maril. [REVIEW] Clio 1:20-20.
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  9
    John Wilkins (1994). 'That's Another Fine Mess You Got Me Into' Emily Gowers: The Loaded Table: Representations of Food in Roman Literature. Pp. Xii + 334. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Cased, £40. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):69-71.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  8
    Tim Madigan (2012). Emily Brontë – Philosopher. Philosophy Now 90:35-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  8
    Norbert Hirschhorn & Polly Longsworth (2013). Was It Epilepsy?: Misdiagnosing Emily Dickinson. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (3):371-386.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  8
    J. Hainsworth (1997). Review. The Ages of Homer. A Tribute to Emily Townsend Vermeule. JB Carter, SP Morris. The Classical Review 47 (1):4-6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  8
    Michael Bernhard, Alya Guseva & Carol Johnson (2005). Emily Barman is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. She is Currently Working on a Book Entitled Contesting Communities: The Transformation of Workplace Charity. Her Research Interests Include the Study of the Nonprofit Sector, Economic Sociology, and Organizational Analysis. She is Also Analyzing the Uses of Tempo. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 34:105-107.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Lucia Binotti (2014). Pere Torrellas and Juan de Flores, Three Spanish Querelle Texts: “Grisel and Mirabella,” “The Slander Against Women,” and “The Defense of Ladies Against Slanderers,” Ed. And Trans. Emily C. Francomano. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2013. Paper. Pp. Ix, 206. $21.50. ISBN: 978-077-272-1341. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (2):553-555.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  2
    María José Alcaraz León (2015). The Sublime in Modern Philosophy. Aesthetics, Ethics and Nature By Emily Brady Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, Pp. 240, HB €60 ISBN: 9780521194143. [REVIEW] Philosophy 90 (2):341-346.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 995