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Emily Murphy [5]Emily R. Murphy [2]
  1. Emily Murphy (forthcoming). Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina Roskies, teneille brown. Episteme.
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  2. Andrew P. Bayliss, Emily Murphy, Claire K. Naughtin, Ada Kritikos, Leonhard Schilbach & Stefanie I. Becker (2013). “Gaze Leading”: Initiating Simulated Joint Attention Influences Eye Movements and Choice Behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):76.
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  3. Molly C. Chalfin, Emily R. Murphy & Katrina A. Karkazis (2008). Women's Neuroethics? Why Sex Matters for Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):1 – 2.
    The Neuroethics Affinity Group of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) met for the third time in October 2007 to review progress in the field of neuroethics and consider high-impact priorities for the future. Closely aligned with ASBH's own goals of recruiting junior scholars to bioethics and mentoring them to successful careers, the Neuroethics Affinity Group placed a call for new ideas to be presented at the Group meeting, specifically by junior attendees. One group responded with the idea (...)
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  4. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  5. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Participants of the Working Meeting on Ethics, Neuroimaging and Limited States of Consciousness. Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. Am J Bioethics 8 (9):3-12.
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  6. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina Roskies, Teneille Brown & Emily Murphy (2008). Brain Images as Legal Evidence. Episteme 5 (3):359-373.
    This paper explores whether brain images may be admitted as evidence in criminal trials under Federal Rule of Evidence 403, which weighs probative value against the danger of being prejudicial, confusing, or misleading to fact finders. The paper summarizes and evaluates recent empirical research relevant to these issues. We argue that currently the probative value of neuroimages for criminal responsibility is minimal, and there is some evidence of their potential to be prejudicial or misleading. We also propose experiments that will (...)
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  7. Judy Illes & Emily R. Murphy (2007). Chimeras of Nurture. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):1 – 2.
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