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Emily R. Grosholz [17]Emily Rolfe Grosholz [1]
  1.  11
    Emily R. Grosholz (2015). Carlo Cellucci. Rethinking Logic: Logic in Relation to Mathematics, Evolution and Method. Dordrecht: Springer, 2013. ISBN: 978-94-007-6090-5 ; 978-94-007-6091-2 . Pp. Xv + 389. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 23 (1):136-140.
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  2.  22
    Emily R. Grosholz (2007). The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue. Early Science and Medicine 12 (4):453-456.
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  3.  52
    Emily R. Grosholz (2001). Critical Studies/Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):79-80.
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  4.  4
    Emily R. Grosholz (2000). The Partial Unification of Domains, Hybrids, and the Growth of Mathematical Knowledge. In Emily Grosholz & Herbert Breger (eds.), The Growth of Mathematical Knowledge. Kluwer Academic Publishers 81--91.
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  5.  18
    Emily R. Grosholz (1986). A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:116 - 124.
    The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion of (...)
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  6.  20
    Emily R. Grosholz (2005). Chikara Sasaki. Descartes's Mathematical Thought. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 237. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003. Pp. XIV + 496. Isbn 1-4020-1746-. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (3):337-342.
  7.  12
    Emily R. Grosholz (1988). Geometry, Time and Force in the Diagrams of Descartes, Galileo, Torricelli and Newton. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:237 - 248.
    Cartesian method both organizes and impoverishes the domains to which Descartes applies it. It adjusts geometry so that it can be better integrated with algebra, and yet deflects a full-scale investigation of curves. It provides a comprehensive conceptual framework for physics, and yet interferes with the exploitation of its dynamical and temporal aspects. Most significantly, it bars a fuller unification of mathematics and physics, despite Descartes' claims to quantify nature. The work of his contemporaries Galileo and Torricelli, and of his (...)
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  8.  6
    Emily R. Grosholz (2005). Berzelian Formulas as Generative Paper Tools. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):411-417.
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  9.  2
    Emily R. Grosholz (2001). Theomorphic Expression in Leibniz's "Discourse on Metaphysics". Studia Leibnitiana 33 (1):4 - 18.
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  10.  4
    Emily R. Grosholz (1990). Problematic Objects Between Mathematics and Mechanics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:385 - 395.
    The existence of mathematical objects may be explained in terms of their occurrence in problems. Especially interesting problems arise at the overlap of domains, and the items that intervene in them are hybrids sharing the characteristics of both domains in an ambiguous way. Euclid's geometry, and Leibniz' work at the intersection of geometry, algebra and mechanics in the late seventeenth century, provide instructive examples of such problems and items. The complex and yet still formal unity of these items calls into (...)
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  11. Emily R. Grosholz (1980). Descartes' Unification of Algebra and Geometry. In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Descartes: Philosophy, Mathematics and Physics. Barnes & Noble Books 156--68.
  12. Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) (2015). G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Netherlands.
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  13. Emily R. Grosholz (2015). Leibniz’s Mathematical and Philosophical Analysis of Time. In Norma B. Goethe, Philip Beeley & David Rabouin (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Netherlands
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  14. Emily R. Grosholz (2003). Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy (1641). In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub. 217.
     
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  15. Emily R. Grosholz (2004). The House We Never Leave: Childhood, Shelter, and Freedom in the Writings of Beauvoir and Colette. In The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press
     
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  16.  11
    Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) (2006). The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
    This collection of new essays treats the historical, philosophical, and literary dimensions of Simone de Beauvoir's thought, and celebrates the 50th anniversary of her most influential book, The Second Sex. A team of distinguished philosophers and literary critics locate her work in the intellectual and political upheavals that marked Paris in the 1930s and 1940s; analyse her philosophical links to 17th-century rationalism, and to Kant, Hegel, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Simone Weil, and Heidegger; and study the connections between her philosophical and literary (...)
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  17. Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) (2004). The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
    This collection of new essays treats the historical, philosophical, and literary dimensions of Simone de Beauvoir's thought, and celebrates the 50th anniversary of her most influential book, The Second Sex. A team of distinguished philosophers and literary critics locate her work in the intellectual and political upheavals that marked Paris in the 1930s and 1940s; analyse her philosophical links to 17th-century rationalism, and to Kant, Hegel, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Simone Weil, and Heidegger; and study the connections between her philosophical and literary (...)
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