Search results for 'Emily S. Cutrell' (try it on Scholar)

  1.  6
    Marcia M. Boumil, Emily S. Cutrell, Kathleen E. Lowney & Harris A. Berman (2012). Pharmaceutical Speakers' Bureaus, Academic Freedom, and the Management of Promotional Speaking at Academic Medical Centers. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (2):311-325.
    Pharmaceutical companies routinely engage physicians, particularly those with prestigious academic credentials, to deliver “educational” talks to groups of physicians in the community to help market the company's brand-name drugs.Although presented as educational, and even though they provide educational content, these events are intended to influence decisions about drug selection in ways that are not based on the suitability and effectiveness of the product, but on the prestige and persuasiveness of the speaker. A number of state legislatures and most academic medical (...)
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  2. Marcia M. Boumil, Emily S. Cutrell, Kathleen E. Lowney & Harris A. Berman (2012). Pharmaceutical Speakers' Bureaus, Academic Freedom, and the Management of Promotional Speaking at Academic Medical Centers. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):311-325.
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  3.  8
    Alisa Gaunder (2011). Win Win's Struggles with the Institutional Transfer of the Emily's List Model to Japan: The Role of Accountability and Policy. Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (1):75-94.
    This article addresses the complexities of institutional transfer by exploring the case of EMILY's List and WIN WIN, two women's organizations in the US and Japan respectively that seek to increase the number of women in office by providing funds early in candidatescultures of giving’ exist, they do not necessarily preclude the success of an EMILY's List-type organization in Japan. Instead, WIN WIN made significant strategic organizational decisions that have impeded its ability to have a significant impact on (...)
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  4.  3
    M. S. W. MS (2004). Transgressing the Boundaries of Science: Glazer, Scepticism, and Emily's Experiment. Nursing Philosophy 5 (1):75–78.
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  5.  3
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
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  6. Patrick J. Keane (2008). Emily Dickinson's Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering. University of Missouri.
    As much a doubter as a believer, Emily Dickinson often expressed views about God in general—and God with respect to suffering in particular. In many of her poems, she contemplates the question posed by countless theologians and poets before her: how can one reconcile a benevolent deity with evil in the world? Examining Dickinson’s perspectives on the role played by a supposedly omnipotent and all-loving God in a world marked by violence and pain, Patrick Keane initially focuses on her (...)
     
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  7.  10
    Arthur W. Frank (2004). Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.
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  8.  12
    Thomas Cox (2004). Transgressing the Boundaries of Science: Glazer, Scepticism, and Emily's Experiment. Nursing Philosophy 5 (1):75-78.
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  9. Sarah Teresa Travis (2015). Book ReviewLiving Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and RaceBy Emily S. Lee, Ed., SUNY Series, Philosophy and Race, Albany : State University of New York Press, 2014, 300 Pp.; ISBN: 978-1-4384-5015-5 , ISBN: 978-1-4384-5016-2. [REVIEW] Critical Philosophy of Race 3 (2):349-351.
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  10.  6
    Glenn Hughes (2014). Love, Terror, and Transcendence in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry. Renascence 66 (4):283-304.
    Drawing on a large number of Dickinson’s poems, this essay explores the poetic originality, depth of insight, and extremes of emotional experience in those poems in which she articulates her relationship with a mystery of divinely transcendent being. Although Dickinson definitively rejected the institutional Christianity of her time and place, she employed the religious language and symbols of Christianity to express in a profoundly idiosyncratic way her recurrent experiences of sacred or divine transcendence. In these poems her articulation both of (...)
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  11.  3
    Adam Katz (2015). Suñña at the Bone: Emily Dickinson’s Theravadin Romanticism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 35 (1):111-119.
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  12.  8
    Cyril Bailey (1927). Juno: A Study in Early Roman Religion. By Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin, Smith College, U.S.A. (Smith College Classical Studies, No. 7.) Pp. Iv+74. Northampton, Massachusetts, May, 1926. 75 Cents. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):43-.
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  13.  6
    Mario D'Avanzo (1967). Emily Dickinson's "Dying Eye". Renascence 19 (2):110-111.
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  14.  9
    John Wilkins (1994). 'That's Another Fine Mess You Got Me Into' Emily Gowers: The Loaded Table: Representations of Food in Roman Literature. Pp. Xii + 334. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Cased, £40. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):69-71.
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  15.  3
    Marlene Springer (1971). Emily Dickinson's Humorous Road to Heaven. Renascence 23 (3):129-136.
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  16.  22
    Jason Boaz Simus (2007). A Response to Emily Brady's 'Aesthetic Regard for Nature in Environmental and Land Art'. Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (3):301 – 305.
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  17. J. Cover (2001). Leibniz's Science of the Rational by Emily Grosholz; Elhanan Yakira. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:180-181.
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  18. William Van Wyck (1937). Emily Dickinson's Songs Out of Sorrow. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 18 (2):183.
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  19. Natalia Vesselova (2011). “The Strongest Tie to Unity and Obedience”: Paradoxes of Freethinking, Religion and Colonialism in Frances Brooke's The History of Emily Montague. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 30:171.
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  20.  4
    Tania Pouwhare & Emily Grabham (2008). “It's Another Way Of Making A Really Big Fuss” Human Rights And Women's Activism In The United Kingdom: An Interview With Tania Pouwhare. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):97-112.
    Following the “Encountering Human Rights” conference in January 2007, Emily Grabham interviewed Tania Pouwhare, a women’s rights activist working at the Women’s Resource Centre in London. Their discussion engaged with the professionalisation of activism, funding constraints and New Labour policies and their impact on immigrant women. Against a background of financial insecurity and huge demand for their services, many women’s organisations in the United Kingdom struggle to use human rights law to advance women’s rights. Nevertheless, the rhetoric of (...)
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  21.  62
    Emily S. Lee (2010). Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Woman’s Encounter with a Saleschild. In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by a “saleschild.” Utilizing the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, this article explores their interaction phenomenologically. This small interaction of seemingly simple misunderstanding represents a limit condition in Merleau-Ponty’s analysis. His phenomenological framework does not explain the chasm between the “saleschild” and Williams, that in a sense they do not participate in the same world. This interaction between the “saleschild” and (...)
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  22.  23
    Emily S. Lee (2008). A Phenomenology for Homi Bhabha's Postcolonial Metropolitan Subject. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-557.
    Homi Bhabha attends to the figure of the postcolonial metropolitan subject-a racialized subject who is not representative of the first world, yet a symbol of the metropolitan sphere. Bhabha describes theirdaily lives as inextricably split or doubled. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when one is caught in not knowing, in focusing attention, and in developing understanding. Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology with the openness in the horizon of the gestaltian framework better accounts for such splits as moments on the (...)
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  23. Emily S. Lee (2008). Book Review of Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss’s Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW] American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7 (2):24--26.
  24.  1
    Sandra M. Gilbert (1985). Life's Empty Pack: Notes Toward a Literary Daughteronomy. Critical Inquiry 11 (3):355.
    A definition of [George] Eliot as renunciatory culture-mother may seem an odd preface to a discussion of Silas Marner since, of all her novels, this richly constructed work is the one in which the empty pack of daughterhood appears fullest, the honey of femininity most unpunished. I want to argue, however, that this “legendary tale,” whose status as a schoolroom classic makes it almost as much a textbook as a novel, examines the relationship between woman’s fate and the structure of (...)
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  25. Maureen B. Adams (2000). Emily Brontë and Dogs: Transformation Within the Human-Dog Bond. Society and Animals 8 (2):167-181.
    This paper examines the bond between humans and dogs as demonstrated in the life and work of Emily Brontë . The nineteenth century author, publishing under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, evinced, both in her personal and professional life, the complex range of emotions explicit in the human-dog bond: attachment and companionship to domination and abuse. In Wuthering Heights, Brontë portrays the dog as scapegoat, illustrating the dark side of the bond found in many cultures. Moreover, she writes with awareness (...)
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  26.  73
    Daniel Frost (2015). Getting Into Mischief: On What It Means to Appeal to the U.S. Constitution. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (2):267-287.
    In this chapter I seek to rehabilitate and elaborate the so-called “mischief rule” of English law. I begin by interrogating two views of legal and constitutional interpretation which make symmetrical mistakes about legal interpretation: Larry Alexander and Emily Sherwin’s view in Demystifying Legal Reasoning and Jack Balkin’s in Living Originalism. Against these views I argue that the appropriate interpretation of laws is guided by the “mischief” the legislators were trying to remedy when they created the law and by what (...)
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  27. Gay L. Gullickson (2008). Emily Wilding Davison: Secular Martyr? Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (2):461-484.
    In 1913, the British suffragette Emily Wilding Davison was killed when she ran onto the race course at Epsom Downs during the running of the Derby. Davison's goals are unclear, but she was immediately hailed as a martyr to the women's cause by her comrades in the Women's Social and Political Union. Others denounced her as a suicidal fanatic. This article evaluates Davison's death by examining the WSPU's emphasis on self-sacrifice, the actions of other women who risked their lives (...)
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  28.  24
    John Coggon (2013). The Wonder of Euthanasia: A Debate That's Being Done to Death. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):401-419.
    In their book Debating Euthanasia, Emily Jackson and John Keown present respectively arguments in favour of and against the legalization of (some instances of) euthanasia and assisted suicide. Jackson advances a case based on a principled commitment to a secular, liberal legal system, arguing that obligations rooted in compassion require the careful development of laws to permit assisted dying. Keown defends the status quo, arguing that the law ought to sustain a prohibition against assisted dying, both out of a (...)
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  29.  31
    Robert Young (2013). 'Debating the Morality and Legality of Medically Assisted Dying'. Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown, Debating Euthanasia. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2012. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):151-160.
    In this Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown’s Debating Euthanasia , the respective lines of argument put forward by each contributor are set out and the key debating points identified. Particular consideration is given to the points each contributor makes concerning the sanctity of human life and whether slippery slopes leading from voluntary medically assisted dying to non-voluntary euthanasia would be established if voluntary medically assisted dying were to be legalised. Finally, consideration is given to the positions (...)
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  30.  47
    Theodore M. Benditt, Fanny's Moral Limits.
    Ever since the publication of Mansfield Park readers and critics have debated how to understand the novel and particularly its heroine Fanny Price. Some have disliked Fanny, have thought of her as prudish and priggish, and perhaps have preferred Mary Crawford and wished for a different ending to the story. Others have defended Fanny’s virtue, her judgment, and her mind, regarding them as quite superior to the virtue, judgment, and minds of all of the other women in the novel, and (...)
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  31.  12
    Christiane Bailey & Chloë Taylor (2013). Editor's Introduction. Phaenex. Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture 8 (2):i-xv.
    Christiane Bailey and Chloë Taylor (Editorial Introduction) Sue Donaldson (Stirring the Pot - A short play in six scenes) Ralph Acampora (La diversification de la recherche en éthique animale et en études animales) Eva Giraud (Veganism as Affirmative Biopolitics: Moving Towards a Posthumanist Ethics?) Leonard Lawlor (The Flipside of Violence, or Beyond the Thought of Good Enough) Kelly Struthers Montford (The “Present Referent”: Nonhuman Animal Sacrifice and the Constitution of Dominant Albertan Identity) James Stanescu (Beyond Biopolitics: Animal Studies, Factory Farms, (...)
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  32.  33
    Janet Folina (2008). Intuition Between the Analytic-Continental Divide: Hermann Weyl's Philosophy of the Continuum. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (1):25-55.
    Though logical positivism is part of Kant's complex legacy, positivists rejected both Kant's theory of intuition and his classification of mathematical knowledge as synthetic a priori. This paper considers some lingering defenses of intuition in mathematics during the early part of the twentieth century, as logical positivism was born. In particular, it focuses on the difficult and changing views of Hermann Weyl about the proper role of intuition in mathematics. I argue that it was not intuition in general, but his (...)
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  33.  3
    Fred S. Michael & Emily Michael (1995). Gassendi's Modified Epicureanism and British Moral Philosophy. History of European Ideas 21 (6):743-761.
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  34.  1
    Sharon Cameron (1978). Naming as History: Dickinson's Poems of Definition. Critical Inquiry 5 (2):223-251.
    For Emily Dickinson, perhaps no more so than for the rest of us, there was a powerful discrepancy between what was "inner than the Bone"1 and what could be acknowledged. To the extent that her poems are a response to that discrepancy—are, on one hand, a defiant attempt to deny that the discrepancy poses a problem and, on the other, an admission of defeat at the problem's enormity—they have much to teach us about the way in which language articulates (...)
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  35.  1
    Emily M. S. Houh (2003). Living "Off-Stage": The Semiotic Potential of Narrative in Paula Johnson's Inner Lives: Voices of African American Women in Prison. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 16 (3):317-325.
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  36.  1
    Emily Michael & Fred S. Michael (1990). Hutcheson's Account of Beauty as a Response to Mandeville. History of European Ideas 12 (5):655-668.
  37. Phyllis Marie Jensen (2015). Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land: A Jungian Portrait. Routledge.
    Emily Carr, often called Canada’s Van Gogh, was a post-impressionist explorer, artist and writer. In _Artist Emily Carr and the Spirit of the Land_ Phyllis Marie Jensen draws on analytical psychology and the theories of feminism and social constructionism for insights into Carr’s life in the late Victorian period and early twentieth century. Presented in two parts, the book introduces Carr’s émigré English family and childhood on the "edge of nowhere" and her art education in San Francisco, (...)
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  38. Emily Michael & Fred S. Michael (1996). Stump`s Dialectic and its Place in the Development of Medieval Logic. Informal Logic 18 (1).
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  39.  24
    Molly C. Chalfin, Emily R. Murphy & Katrina A. Karkazis (2008). Women's Neuroethics? Why Sex Matters for Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):1 – 2.
    The Neuroethics Affinity Group of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities met for the third time in October 2007 to review progress in the field of neuroethics and consider high-impact priorities for the future. Closely aligned with ASBH's own goals of recruiting junior scholars to bioethics and mentoring them to successful careers, the Neuroethics Affinity Group placed a call for new ideas to be presented at the Group meeting, specifically by junior attendees. One group responded with the idea to (...)
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  40. Emily Grosholz (2010). Leibniz's Metaphysics of Time and Space (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 246-247.
    Most discussions of Leibniz's metaphysics of time and space begin and end with the correspondence between Leibniz and Samuel Clarke, Newton's friend and defender. But Leibniz's ideas about time and space are far richer than this exchange suggests, and Michael Futch shows that the study of those investigations will enhance current discussion among philosophers and cosmologists. Futch's scholarly attention to a wide range of texts is matched by his philosophical acuity. His detailed expositions of texts are not tedious or pedantic (...)
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  41.  3
    Emily Katz (2016). Bridging the Gap Between Aristotle's Science and Ethics Ed. By Devin Henry and Karen Margrethe Nielsen. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):155-156.
    Most of the essays in this excellent collection give clear and persuasive arguments about difficult topics, and several break new ground. They are demanding but accessible to the non-specialist, with all Greek transliterated and translated; footnotes send the specialist reader to other published works where the case for a point is made in more technical detail.The book’s stated aim casts a wide net: “to expose some of the ways in which the received view has overestimated the gap Aristotle sees between (...)
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  42.  1
    Emily Kelahan (forthcoming). Simple Ideas and Hume’s Missing Shade of Blue. Philosophia:1-17.
    This paper provides support for the unorthodox view that Hume’s simple ideas are most fruitfully understood as theoretical posits by showing that adopting this interpretation solves a lingering interpretive difficulty, the missing shade of blue. The missing shade of blue is thought to pose a serious challenge to the legitimacy of Hume’s copy principle. Thinking of Humean simple ideas as theoretical posits reveals a dialectical mismatch between Hume and his envisioned reader that, once understood, makes it clear that the case (...)
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  43.  29
    Emily Katz (2013). Aristotle's Critique of Platonist Mathematical Objects: Two Test Cases From Metaphysics M 2. Apeiron 46 (1):26-47.
    Books M and N of Aristotle's Metaphysics receive relatively little careful attention. Even scholars who give detailed analyses of the arguments in M-N dismiss many of them as hopelessly flawed and biased, and find Aristotle's critique to be riddled with mistakes and question-begging. This assessment of the quality of Aristotle's critique of his predecessors (and of the Platonists in particular), is widespread. The series of arguments in M 2 (1077a14-b11) that targets separate mathematical objects is the subject of particularly strong (...)
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  44.  63
    Emily Carson (2004). Metaphysics, Mathematics and the Distinction Between the Sensible and the Intelligible in Kant's Inaugural Dissertation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (2):165-194.
    In this paper I argue that Kant's distinction in the Inaugural Dissertation between the sensible and the intelligible arises in part out of certain open questions left open by his comparison between mathematics and metaphysics in the Prize Essay. This distinction provides a philosophical justification for his distinction between the respective methods of mathematics and metaphysics and his claim that mathematics admits of a greater degree of certainty. More generally, this illustrates the importance of Kant's reflections on mathematics (...)
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  45.  39
    Emily Brady (2011). Adam Smith's ''Sympathetic Imagination'' and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Environment. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):95-109.
    This paper explores the significance of Adam Smith's ideas for defending non-cognitivist theories of aesthetic appreciation of nature. Objections to non-cognitivism argue that the exercise of emotion and imagination in aesthetic judgement potentially sentimentalizes and trivializes nature. I argue that although directed at moral judgement, Smith's views also find a place in addressing this problem. First, sympathetic imagination may afford a deeper and more sensitive type of aesthetic engagement. Second, in taking up the position of the impartial spectator, aesthetic judgements (...)
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  46.  25
    Emily McRae (2011). The Cultivation of Moral Feelings and Mengzi's Method of Extension. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):587-608.
    Offered here is an interpretation of the ancient Confucian philosopher Mengzi's (372–289 B.C.E.) method of cultivating moral feelings, which he calls "extension." It is argued that this method is both psychologically plausible and an important, but often overlooked, part of moral life. In this interpretation, extending our moral feelings is not a project in logical consistency, analogical reasoning, or emotional intuition. Rather, Mengzi's method of extension is a project in realigning the human heart that harnesses our rational, reflective, and emotional (...)
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  47.  7
    Emily Michael (1974). Peirce's Early Study of the Logic of Relations, 1865-1867. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 10 (2):63 - 75.
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  48.  7
    Emily Zakin (2013). Godless Jews and Secular Christians: A Commentary on Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):184-195.
    Responding to Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism” and its posing of the “Christian Question,” in this paper I return to Freud's Moses and Monotheism and its narrative of Jewish self-division. In highlighting the retroactive formation of identity, I note both its temporal dimension and the force of exclusivity it generates. This reading suggests a contrast between such theo-political communities, with their legacies of affiliation, and Christian self-absolution (the refusal of constitutive self-division) with its image of a new man. I take (...)
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  49.  3
    Emily Michael (1976). Peirce's Earliest Contact with Scholastic Logic. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 12 (1):46 - 55.
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  50.  10
    Emily Michael (1978). Peirce's Adaptation of Kant's Definition of Logic: The Early Manuscripts. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 14 (3):176 - 183.
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