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  1. Elizabeth S. Spelke & Emmanuel Dupoux, Native Over Foreign Speakers.
    Infants learn from adults readily and cooperate with them spontaneously, but how do they select culturally appropriate teachers and collaborators? Building on evidence that children demonstrate social preferences for speakers of their native language, Experiment 1 presented 10- month-old infants with videotaped events in which a native and a foreign speaker introduced two different toys. When given a chance to choose between real exemplars of the objects, infants preferentially chose the toy modeled by the native speaker. In Experiment 2, 2.5-year-old (...)
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  2. Marine Buon, Pierre Jacob, Elsa Loissel & Emmanuel Dupoux (2013). A Non-Mentalistic Cause-Based Heuristic in Human Social Evaluations. Cognition 126 (2):149-155.
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  3. Laurent Cleret de Langavant, Charlotte Jacquemot, Anne-Catherine Bachoud-Lévi & Emmanuel Dupoux (2013). The Second Person in “I”-“You”-“It” Triadic Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):416 - 417.
    Second person social cognition cannot be restricted to dyadic interactions between two persons (the and the ). Many instances of social communication are triadic, and involve a third person (the ), which is the object of the interaction. We discuss neuropsychological and brain imaging data showing that triadic interactions involve dedicated brain networks distinct from those of dyadic interactions.
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  4. Andrew Martin, Sharon Peperkamp & Emmanuel Dupoux (2013). Learning Phonemes With a Proto-Lexicon. Cognitive Science 37 (1):103-124.
    Before the end of the first year of life, infants begin to lose the ability to perceive distinctions between sounds that are not phonemic in their native language. It is typically assumed that this developmental change reflects the construction of language-specific phoneme categories, but how these categories are learned largely remains a mystery. Peperkamp, Le Calvez, Nadal, and Dupoux (2006) present an algorithm that can discover phonemes using the distributions of allophones as well as the phonetic properties of the allophones (...)
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  5. Yasuyo Minagawa-Kawai, Alejandrina Cristia, Bria Long, Inga Vendelin, Yoko Hakuno, Michel Dutat, Luca Filippin, Dominique Cabrol & Emmanuel Dupoux (2013). Inights on NIRS Sensitivity From a Cross-Linguistic Study on the Emergence of Phonological Grammar. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Each language has a unique set of phonemic categories and phonotactic rules which determine permissible sound sequences in that language. Behavioral research demonstrates that one’s native language shapes the perception of both sound categories and sound sequences in adults, and neuroimaging results further indicate that the processing of native phonemes and phonotactics involves a left-dominant perisylvian brain network. Recent work using a novel technique, functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS), has suggested that a left-dominant network becomes evident towards the end of (...)
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  6. Florian Cova, Emmanuel Dupoux & Pierre Jacob (2012). On Doing Things Intentionally. Mind and Language 27 (4):378-409.
    Recent empirical and conceptual research has shown that moral considerations have an influence on the way we use the adverb ‘intentionally’. Here we propose our own account of these phenomena, according to which they arise from the fact that the adverb ‘intentionally’ has three different meanings that are differently selected by contextual factors, including normative expectations. We argue that our hypotheses can account for most available data and present some new results that support this. We end by discussing the implications (...)
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  7. Thomas Hannagan, Emmanuel Dupoux & Anne Christophe (2011). Holographic String Encoding. Cognitive Science 35 (1):79-118.
    In this article, we apply a special case of holographic representations to letter position coding. We translate different well-known schemes into this format, which uses distributed representations and supports constituent structure. We show that in addition to these brain-like characteristics, performances on a standard benchmark of behavioral effects are improved in the holographic format relative to the standard localist one. This notably occurs because of emerging properties in holographic codes, like transposition and edge effects, for which we give formal demonstrations. (...)
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  8. Florian Cova, Emmanuel Dupoux & Pierre Jacob (2010). Moral Evaluation Shapes Linguistic Reports of Others' Psychological States, Not Theory-of-Mind Judgments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):334-335.
    We use psychological concepts (e.g., intention and desire) when we ascribe psychological states to others for purposes of describing, explaining, and predicting their actions. Does the evidence reported by Knobe show, as he thinks, that moral evaluation shapes our mastery of psychological concepts? We argue that the evidence so far shows instead that moral evaluation shapes the way we report, not the way we think about, others' psychological states.
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  9. Emmanuel Dupoux, Sharon Peperkamp & Núria Sebastián-Gallés (2010). Limits on Bilingualism Revisited: Stress 'Deafness' in Simultaneous French–Spanish Bilinguals. Cognition 114 (2):266-275.
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  10. Sid Kouider, Vincent de Gardelle, Jérôme Sackur & Emmanuel Dupoux (2010). How Rich is Consciousness? The Partial Awareness Hypothesis. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (7):301-307.
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  11. Paul Smolensky, Emmanuel Dupoux, Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson (2009). Universals in Cognitive Theories of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):468.
    Generative linguistics' search for linguistic universals (1) is not comparable to the vague explanatory suggestions of the article; (2) clearly merits a more central place than linguistic typology in cognitive science; (3) is fundamentally untouched by the article's empirical arguments; (4) best explains the important facts of linguistic diversity; and (5) illuminates the dominant component of language's nature: biology.
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  12. Emmanuel Dupoux, Vincent de Gardelle & Sid Kouider (2008). Subliminal Speech Perception and Auditory Streaming. Cognition 109 (2):267-273.
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  13. Emmanuel Dupoux, Núria Sebastián-Gallés, Eduardo Navarrete & Sharon Peperkamp (2008). Persistent Stress 'Deafness': The Case of French Learners of Spanish. Cognition 106 (2):682-706.
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  14. Pierre Jacob & Emmanuel Dupoux (2007). Universal Moral Grammar: A Critical Appraisal. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):373-378.
    A new framework for the study of the human moral faculty is currently receiving much attention: the so-called ‘universal moral grammar' framework. It is based on an intriguing analogy, first pointed out by Rawls, between the study of the human moral sense and Chomsky's research program into the human language faculty. In order to assess UMG, we ask: is moral competence modular? Does it have an underlying hierarchical grammatical structure? Does moral diversity rest on culture-dependent parameters? We review evidence that (...)
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  15. Sid Kouider, Vincent de Gardelle, Emmanuel Dupoux & Ned Block (2007). Partial Awareness and the Illusion of Phenomenal Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):510-510.
    The dissociation Block provides between phenomenal and access consciousness (P-consciousness and A-consciousness) captures much of our intuition about conscious experience. However, it raises a major methodological puzzle, and is not uniquely supported by the empirical evidence. We provide an alternative interpretation based on the notion of levels of representation and partial awareness.
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  16. Sharon Peperkamp, Rozenn Le Calvez, Jean-Pierre Nadal & Emmanuel Dupoux (2006). The Acquisition of Allophonic Rules: Statistical Learning with Linguistic Constraints. Cognition 101 (3):B31-B41.
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  17. Sid Kouider & Emmanuel Dupoux (2004). Partial Awareness Creates the "Illusion" of Subliminal Semantic Priming. Psychological Science 15 (2):75-81.
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  18. Emmanuel Dupoux (ed.) (2002). Language, Brain and Cognitive Development: Essays in Honor of Jacques Mehler. MIT Press.
    The contributions to this collection, written in honor of Jacques Mehler, a founder of the field of psycholinguistics, assess the progress of cognitive science.
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  19. Sid Kouider & Emmanuel Dupoux (2001). A Functional Disconnection Between Spoken and Visual Word Recognition: Evidence From Unconscious Priming. Cognition 82 (1):35- 49.