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Emmon Bach [30]Emmon W. Bach [2]
  1. Emmon Bach, Linguistic Universals and Particulars.
    Preconference version of paper for the 17th International Congress of Linguists in Prague, July, 2003.
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  2. Emmon Bach, A Chrestomathy of Chestnuts.
    1. When he was in India, Burton learned Persian. 2. When Burton was in India, he learned Persian. 3. Burton learned Persian, when he was in India. 4. He learned Persian, when Burton was in India. 5. When she was in India, every woman learned Hindi. 6. When every woman was in India, she learned Hindi. 7. Every woman learned. Hindi, when she was in India. 8. When he was in. Alaska, he learned Tlingit. 9. He learned Tlingit, when he (...)
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  3. Emmon Bach, An Extension of Classical Transformational Grammar.
    0. Introductory remarks. I assume that every serious theory of language must give some explicit account of the relationship between expressions in the language described and expressions in some interpreted language which spells out the semantics of the language.1 Let's call this relationship the translation relation. Theories differ as to how this relation is specified. In the Aspects theory of syntax, taken together with a Katz-Postal view of "semantic rules" (Chomsky 1965; Katz and Postal, 1964), it was assumed that (...)
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  4. Emmon Bach, Argument Marking in Riverine Tsimshian.
    Smalgyaxian (Tsimshianic): located along Nass River, the lower reaches of the Skeena and on coastal and island communities around and below mouth of Skeena and in Metlakatla, Alaska. Four languages: Coast Tsimshian (CT), Southern Tsimshian (ST); Nisg̱aʼa (Ni), Gitksan (Gi). The punctuation indicates subgrouping: Nisg̱aʼa and Gitksan are very close, the distinction being more political than linguistic. Southern Tsimshian (Sgu̎u̎x) is spoken by only a few people (in one..
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  5. Emmon Bach, ACTL Semantics: Compositionality and Morphosemantics: II: Words, Morphemes, Constructions, Interpretations.
    A language is specified by a Lexicon and a Grammar. A constructive grammar goes like this: The Lexicon provides a set of items. The items are associated with Categories and Denotations. The Grammar gives a recursive specification of the language by defining sets of derived expressions starting with the Lexicon as the base and allowing the combination of lexical items into expressions with their Categories and Denotations, by a rule-to-rule procedure, and so on ad libitum.
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  6. Emmon Bach, Conflict and Consensus About First Nations' Languages.
    All over the world, local languages are facing possible or probable extinction. The situation is nowhere more acute than for First Nations* in the regions now called the United States of America and Canada. In the face of this situation many people have become interested in studying endangered languages. Interest in threatened languages comes from many different sides: commercial, academic, scientific, religious, and more. The most immediately affected are of course the very speakers of the languages and the communities where (...)
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  7. Emmon Bach, Deixis in the Pacific Northwest: Northern Wakashan.
    Summary: demonstrative and determiner systems in the Pacific Northwest show areal similarities. The categories include two or three way deictic distinctions, visibility, modality (existent - non existent), and temporal contrasts. There are formal characteristics that are shared as well. The presentation will give a preliminary survey of the features across some languages of the area, with emphasis on Northern Wakashan. Then we will look at two especially interesting categories: `just gone' in Upper North Wakashan, which combines spatial and temporal (or: (...)
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  8. Emmon Bach, On Morphosemantics: The Internal Meanings of Words.
    The term "morphosemantics" in the title of this talk is intended to raise a fundamental question about linguistic expressions and their meanings. When we talk about the meanings of morphemes and their combination into words should we expect to find the same kinds of meanings and combinations of meanings that we associate with the processes of putting together words into phrases? The answers to this question vary widely or even wildly across different linguists and their schools or theories. For example, (...)
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  9. Emmon Bach, Parochial and Universal Semantics: Semantic Typology and Little Studied Languages.
    ...the true difference between languages is not in what may or may not be expressed but in what must or must not be conveyed by the speakers.
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  10. Emmon Bach, Subordination and Mood in Western Abenaki.
    Many (all?) languages regiment differences between main and subordinate clauses and between straightforward assertions and other kinds of expressions. There are two main ways of expressing grammatical differences in natural languages: structural and inflectional. Other resources: lexical, intonational, etc.
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  11. Emmon Bach, Structure and Texture: Toward an Understanding of Real Languages.
    About: the tensions between the inner and outer view of R-languages ("real languages"), the language-centered and theory-centered study of languages, the (often foreign) linguist and the (sometimes linguist) native speaker, description and theory, a language as a set of choices and extensions of universal grammar and as a concrete realization in a particular culture and history. The materials for this paper are drawn mostly from First Nations languages, especially those of the Pacific Northwest.
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  12. Emmon Bach, Western Abenaki: Some Other Verb Forms.
    I want to do two things here today. First, I want to describe and comment on some materials in and on Western Abenaki. Second, I want to make some additions to the various lists of Western Abenaki verb forms that have been available from published sources. This will be strictly a report on work in progress. Let me make acknowledgments right off to two colleagues: Roger Higgins, who has been working on Wampanoag (Massachusett) for some years, and Roy Wright, with (...)
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  13. Emmon Bach, ACTL Semantics: Compositionality and Morphosemantics: I: Syntactic and Semantic Assumptions: Compositionality.
    Theme of two lectures: how does meaning work in grammar and lexicon? General question: Are morphemes the minimal meaningful units of language? Are the meanings of the parts of words of the same kind as those of syntax? The answer to this question has an obvious bearing on the question of the derivation of complex words "in the syntax." Is the split between syntax and morphology the proper division for asking the previous question? Answer: No. The crucial distinction is that (...)
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  14. Emmon Bach, [63] on Time, Tense, and Aspect: An Essay in English Metaphysics.
    In 1936, Benjamin Lee Whorf wrote a justly famous paper entitled "An American Indian Model of the Universe" (Carroll, 1956). In that paper, Whorf criticized the easy assumption that people in different cultures, speaking radically different languages, share common presuppositions about what the world is like. He contrasted the Hopi view of space and time with what he called elsewhere the Standard Average European view. For the Hopi, space and time are inherently relativistic; for the speaker of Western European languages, (...)
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  15. Emmon Bach, On Time, Tense, and Aspect: An Essay in English Metaphysics.
    In 1936, Benjamin Lee Whorf wrote a justly famous paper entitled "An American Indian Model of the Universe" (Carroll, 1956). In that paper, Whorf criticized the easy assumption that people in different cultures, speaking radically different languages, share common presuppositions about what the world is like. He contrasted the Hopi view of space and time with what he called elsewhere the Standard Average European view. For the Hopi, space and time are inherently relativistic; for the speaker of Western European languages, (...)
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  16. Emmon Bach, Semantic Universals.
    The controversies surrounding Daniel Everett's characterization of the Amazonian language Pirahã and the Evans and Levinson paper about "the myth of language universals" (2009) are just two recent manifestations of a debate about linguistic theory and methodology that is anything but new.
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  17. Emmon W. Bach, Discontinous Constituents in Generalized Categorial Grammar.
    [1]. Recently renewed interest in non transformational approaches to syntax [2] suggests that it might be well to take another look at categorial grammars, since they seem to have been neglected largely because they had been shown to be equivalent to context free phrase structure grammars in weak generative capacity and it was believed that such grammars were incapable of describing natural languages in a natural way. It is my purpose here to sketch a theory of grammar which represents a (...)
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  18. Emmon Bach & Wynn Chao (2012). The Metaphysics of Natural Language (S). In Ruth M. Kempson, Tim Fernando & Nicholas Asher (eds.), Philosophy of Linguistics. North Holland. 175.
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  19. Emmon Bach (2005). Is Word-Formation Compositional. In Greg N. Carlson & Francis Jeffry Pelletier (eds.), Reference and Quantification: The Partee Effect. Csli. 107--112.
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  20. Emmon Bach (2002). On the Surface Verb Q'ay'ai Qela. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):531-544.
  21. Emmon Bach (2002). Source: Linguistics and Philosophy, Vol. 25, No. 5/6 (Dec., 2002), Pp. 531-544 Published By: Springer. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5/6):531-544.
  22. Emmon Bach (1995). A Note on Quantification and Blankets in Haisla. In Emmon Bach, Eloise Jelinek, Angelika Kratzer & Barbara Partee (eds.), Quantification in Natural Languages. Kluwer. 13--20.
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  23. Emmon Bach, Eloise Jelinek, Angelika Kratzer & Barbara Partee (eds.) (1995). Quantification in Natural Languages. Kluwer.
    This extended collection of papers is the result of putting recent ideas on quantification to work on a wide variety of languages.
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  24. Jody Azzouni, Emmon Bach, Chris Barker, Wojciech Buzkowski, Robyn Carsten, Gennaro Chierchia, Max Cresswell, Mark Crimmins, Mary Dalrymple & Martin Davies (1993). Reviewers of Submitted Papers During 1993. Linguistics and Philosophy 16:655-556.
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  25. Emmon Bach (1986). The Algebra of Events. Linguistics and Philosophy 9 (1):5--16.
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  26. Emmon Bach (1983). A Framework for Syntax and Semantics. In Alex Orenstein & Rafael Stern (eds.), Developments in Semantics. Haven. 2--166.
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  27. Emmon W. Bach (1980). In Defense of Passive. Linguistics and Philosophy 3 (3):297 - 341.
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  28. Emmon Bach & Barbara H. Partee (1980). Anaphora and Semantic Structure. In Barbara H. Partee (ed.), Compositionality in Formal Semantics - Selected Papers by Barbara H. Partee. Blackwell. 122--152.
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  29. Emmon Bach & Robin Cooper (1978). The NP-S Analysis of Relative Clauses and Compositional Semantics. Linguistics and Philosophy 2 (1):145 - 150.
    We have sketched how it is possible to give an analysis for adjoined relative clauses which is consistent with the compositionality principle and have shown that the technique which seems necessary for this analysis can be used to provide a compositional semantics for the NP-S analysis of English relative clauses.It is unlikely that anyone working within the framework of a compositional theory would choose the NP-S analysis for English, since it is clearly much less elegant and simple, in some intuitive (...)
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  30. Emmon Bach (1970). Problominalization. Linguistic Inquiry 1:121--122.
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  31. Emmon Bach (1968). Nouns and Noun Phrases. In Emmon Bach & R. Harms (eds.), Universals in Linguistic Theory. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. 90--122.
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  32. Emmon Bach & R. Harms (eds.) (1968). Universals in Linguistic Theory. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
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