Search results for 'Emotions (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Phil Hutchinson (2008). Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Experimental methods and conceptual confusion : philosophy, science, and what emotions really are -- To 'make our voices resonate' or 'to be silent'? : shame as fundamental ontology -- Emotion, cognition, and world -- Shame and world.
     
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  2.  36
    Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and (...)
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  3. Susan James (1997). Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
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  4.  35
    Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  5.  39
    Israel Scheffler (1974). In Praise of the Cognitive Emotions and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge.
    Examining a broad range of issues - from computers in school to math education, from metaphor to morality - these essays are unified by Scheffler's conviction ...
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  6. Juha Sihvola & Troels Engberg-Pedersen (1998). The Emotions in Hellenistic Philosophy.
     
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  7.  21
    Kevin White (2008). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in (...)
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  8. Kevin White (2008). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in (...)
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  9. Susan James (1997). Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Passion and Action explores the place of the emotions in seventeenth-century understandings of the body and mind, and the role they were held to play in reasoning and action. Interest in the passions pervaded all areas of philosophical enquiry, and was central to the theories of many major figures, including Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke. Yet little attention has been paid to this topic in studies of early modern thought. Susan James surveys the inheritance of ancient and (...)
     
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  10.  43
    Stephen Chanderbhan (2013). The Shifting Prominence of Emotions in the Moral Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. Diametros 38:62-85.
    In this article, I claim that emotions, as we understand the term today, have a more prominent role in the moral life described by Thomas Aquinas than has been traditionally thought. First, clarity is needed about what exactly the emotions are in Aquinas. Second, clarity is needed about true virtue: specifically, about the relationship of acquired virtue to infused, supernatural virtues. Given a fuller understanding of both these things, I claim that emotions are not only auxiliary to (...)
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  11. Anthony Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2003). Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    This major volume of original essays maps the place of emotion in human nature, through a discussion of the relation between consciousness and body; by analysing the importance of emotion for human agency by pointing to the ways in which practical rationality may be enhanced, as well as hindered, by emotions; and by exploring questions of value in making sense of emotions at a political, ethical and personal level. Leading researchers in the field reflect on the nature of (...)
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  12. R. Wollheim (2003). Emotions and Their Philosophy of Mind. In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press 19-38.
     
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  13. Anthony Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2010). Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    This major volume of original essays maps the place of emotion in human nature, through a discussion of the relation between consciousness and body; by analysing the importance of emotion for human agency by pointing to the ways in which practical rationality may be enhanced, as well as hindered, by emotions; and by exploring questions of value in making sense of emotions at a political, ethical and personal level. Leading researchers in the field reflect on the nature of (...)
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  14. Anthony Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2011). Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    This major volume of original essays maps the place of emotion in human nature, through a discussion of the relation between consciousness and body; by analysing the importance of emotion for human agency by pointing to the ways in which practical rationality may be enhanced, as well as hindered, by emotions; and by exploring questions of value in making sense of emotions at a political, ethical and personal level. Leading researchers in the field reflect on the nature of (...)
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  15.  72
    Robert M. Gordon (1987). The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Structure of Emotions argues that emotion concepts should have a much more important role in the social and behavioural sciences than they now enjoy, and shows that certain influential psychological theories of emotions overlook the explanatory power of our emotion concepts. Professor Gordon also outlines a new account of the nature of commonsense (or ‘folk’) psychology in general.
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  16.  77
    Anthony E. Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2003). Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
  17.  14
    M. Wynn (2002). Valuing the World: The Emotions as Data for the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (2):97-113.
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  18.  17
    Richard Wollheim (2003). II. The Emotions and Their Philosophy of Mind. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:19-38.
    When I was invited by Yale University to deliver the Cassirer lectures, I hesitated for a topic. I wanted something new. I proposed the emotions, and at that time my knowledge of the topic was so slight that I didn't know whether it was something that I had already written on or not. I mention this fact because one thing that I have since learnt about the emotions is that such ignorance is in order. For it is one (...)
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  19.  22
    Gad C. Isay (2009). A Humanist Synthesis of Memory, Language, and Emotions: Qian Mu's Interpretation of Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):425-437.
    While Qian Mu intentionally avoided systematic philosophical arguments, his references to memory, language, and emotions, as expressed in a book he wrote in 1948, were suggestive of new interpretations of traditional Chinese, and especially Confucian, ideas such as human autonomy, mind, human nature, morality, immortality, and spirituality. The foremost contribution of Qian’s humanist synthesis rests in its articulation of the idea of the person. Across the context of memory, language, and emotions, the tiyong dynamics of mind and human (...)
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  20. Peter A. French & Howard K. Wettstein (1998). Philosophy of Emotions.
     
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  21. Anthony John Patrick Kenny (1961). Act and Object in the Philosophy of the Emotions and of the Will.
     
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  22.  69
    Michael Stocker (1996). Valuing Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the result of a uniquely productive union of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and anthropology, and explores the complexity and importance of emotions. Michael Stocker places emotions at the very center of human identity, life and value. He shows how important are the social and emotional contexts of ethical dilemmas and inner conflicts, and he challenges philosophical theories that try to overgeneralize and over simplify by leaving out the particulars of each situation. This book will interest a broad (...)
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  23.  6
    Tom Cochrane (2016). Mikko Salmela and Christian von Scheve , Collective Emotions: Perspectives From Psychology, Philosophy, and Sociology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):467-473.
    Review of OUP volume on collective emotions which provides a taxonomy of the different theories, raising potential objections for each.
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  24. Stephen Leighton (ed.) (2003). Philosophy and the Emotions: A Reader. Broadview Press.
    While philosophical speculation into the nature and value of emotions is at least as old as the Pre-Socratics, William James' "What is an emotion?" reinvigorated interest in the question. Coming to grips with James' proposals, particularly in the light of subsequent concerns for the difficulties inherent in a so-called private language, led philosophers away from analyses centred on feelings to ones centred on thoughts. Analyzing the emotions in this way involves returning to a vision of the emotions (...)
     
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  25. Robert C. Solomon (1999). The Philosophy of Emotions. In M. Lewis & J. Havil (eds.), Handbook of Emotions. Guilford Press
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  26. W. George Turski (1994). Toward a Rationality of Emotions: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind. Athens: Ohio University Press.
    The recent reemergence of theories that emphasize the semantic and conceptual aspects of emotions has also brought to attention questions about their rationality. There are essentially two standard senses in which emotions can be assessed for their rationality. First, emotions can be said to be categorically rational insofar as they presuppose our psychological capacities to be clearly conscious of distinctions, to engage and manipulate concepts, and hence to provide intentional descriptions as reasons for what we feel and (...)
     
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  27.  30
    Ronald de Sousa (2010). The Mind's Bermuda Triangle: Philosophy of Emotions and Empirical Science. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press
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  28.  16
    R. Jay Wallace (2000). An Anti-Philosophy of the Emotions? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):469 - 477.
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  29.  38
    Robert C. Solomon (2006). Emotions in Continental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 1 (5):413-431.
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  30. C. Behan Mccullagh (1989). Robert M. Gordon: "The Structure of Emotions: Investigations in Cognitive Philosophy". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67:107.
     
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  31.  39
    Robert C. Solomon (2006). Emotions in Continental Philosophy. Adapted From Dreyfus and Wrathall, Eds., Blackwell Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism, Blackwell, 2006. Philosophy Compass 1 (5):413–431.
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  32.  35
    R. Jay Wallace (2000). An Anti-Philosophy of the Emotions? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):469-477.
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  33.  24
    Gavin Brent Sullivan (2007). Wittgenstein and the Grammar of Pride: The Relevance of Philosophy to Studies of Self-Evaluative Emotions. New Ideas in Psychology 25 (3):233-252.
    In this paper, Wittgenstein's philosophical approach and remarks are used to highlight features of pride that are not represented in contemporary psychological theories. Wittgenstein's scattered philosophical and autobiographical remarks on pride are arranged in order to engage with aspects of pride (e.g., as a self-conscious emotion) that can appear to have only empirical answers. Important themes to emerge in the resulting surview include the temptation to talk of pride as having or being a structure, the role of personal context in (...)
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  34.  7
    Christine Clavien, Julien Deonna & Ivo Wallimann (2006). Introduction: Emotions and Rationality in Moral Philosophy. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):5-9.
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  35.  3
    Susan James (2000). Passion and Action: The Emotions in the Seventeenth Century Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):723-726.
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  36. Eric Dayton (1995). W. George Turski, Toward a Rationality of Emotions: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (3):218-220.
     
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  37.  1
    Alan Chan (1998). Review of Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy by Joel Marks; Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 48 (1):176-186.
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  38.  3
    Richard A. Watson (1999). Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):168-169.
  39. A. K. L. Chan (1998). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy, Edited by Joel Marks and Roger T. Ames. Philosophy East and West 48:176-186.
     
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  40. Ronald de Sousa, Jing-Song Ma & Vincent Shen (2005). Comment on Research Outcome of Philosophy of Emotions in Recent Ten Years. Philosophy and Culture 32 (10):147-156.
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  41. Israel Scheffler (2010). In Praise of the Cognitive Emotions : And Other Essays in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge.
    First published in 1991, _In Praise of Cognitive Emotions_ comprises fourteen of Scheffler's most recent essays - all of which challenge contemporary notions of education and rationality. While defending the ideal of rationality, he insists that rationality not be identified with a mental faculty or a mechanism of inference but taken rather as the capactity to grasp principles and purposes and to evaluate them in the light of relevant reasons. Examining a broad range of issues - from computers in school (...)
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  42. Robert C. Solomon (ed.) (2004). Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers since Aristotle have explored emotion, and the study of emotion has always been essential to the love of wisdom. In recent years Anglo-American philosophers have rediscovered and placed new emphasis on this very old discipline. The view that emotions are ripe for philosophical analysis has been supported by a considerable number of excellent publications. In this volume, Robert Solomon brings together some of the best Anglo-American philosophers now writing on the philosophy of emotion, with chapters from philosophers who (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Anderson (2008). Emotions in Kant's Later Moral Philosophy: Honour and the Phenomenology of Moral Value. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter
  44.  26
    Roger Scruton, Peter Kivy, Jerrold Levinson, Malcolm Budd, Diana Raffman & Lydia Goehr (1994). Recent Books in the Philopshy of MusicMusic Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience.Sound and Semblance: Reflections on Musical Representation.The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Music, Art and Metaphysics: Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics.Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories.Language, Music and Mind.The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 44 (177):503.
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  45.  55
    A. Hatzimoysis (2006). Review: Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (458):424-427.
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  46.  6
    Tom Cochrane (2016). Mikko Salmela and Christian von Scheve , Collective Emotions: Perspectives From Psychology, Philosophy, and Sociology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):467-473.
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  47.  25
    Ronald de Sousa (1997). Toward a Rationality of Emotions: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind George Turski Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1994, Xv + 182, $39.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 36 (03):666-.
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  48.  21
    Jamie Dow (2009). Philosophy (K.) Kristjánsson Aristotle, Emotions, and Education. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007. Pp. X + 194. £55. 9780754660163. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:238-.
  49.  21
    John Cottingham (1999). Susan James, Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth‐Century Philosophy:Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth‐Century Philosophy. Ethics 110 (1):205-207.
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  50.  19
    Douglas Cairns (2007). Philosophy (D.) Konstan The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks. Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. (Robson Classical Lectures). U. Of Toronto P., 2006. Pp. Xvi + 422. £55. 9780802091031. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:248-.
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