Search results for 'Emotions (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  55
    Rolf Petri (2012). The Idea of Culture and the History of Emotions. Historein 12:21-37.
    The essay operates an itemisation of the three main streams in the history of emotions: the history of individual emotions, the study of the role that emotions have in historical processes, and the reflection on the influence of emotions on history writing. The second part of the article is devoted to the methodological and theoretical status of the study of past emotions. It highlights how many studies in (...)
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  2.  34
    Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement (...)
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  3.  21
    Kevin White (2008). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in (...)
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  4. Kevin White (2008). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in (...)
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  5.  18
    Daniel M. Gross (2006). The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science. University of Chicago Press.
    Princess Diana’s death was a tragedy that provoked mourning across the globe; the death of a homeless person, more often than not, is met with apathy. How can we account for this uneven distribution of emotion? Can it simply be explained by the prevailing scientific understanding? Uncovering a rich tradition beginning with Aristotle, The Secret History of Emotion offers a counterpoint to the way we generally understand emotions today. Through a radical rereading of Aristotle, Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Sarah (...)
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  6.  48
    Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. Nai010 Publishers 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  7.  63
    David Hume (2007). A Dissertation on the Passions: The Natural History of Religion: A Critical Edition. Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in 1757. In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion. The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. Authoritative critical texts are accompanied by a full array of editorial matter.
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  8. Paul Katsafanas (2011). The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in (...)
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  9.  23
    Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions (...)
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  10. Ramsay MacMullen (2003). Feelings in History, Ancient and Modern. Regina Books.
     
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  11.  3
    Richard A. Watson (1999). Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):168-169.
  12.  16
    Bijoy H. Boruah (1988). Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In response (...)
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  13.  9
    Adela Pinch (1996). Strange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen. Stanford University Press.
    This book contends that when late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century writers sought to explain the origins of emotions, they often discovered that their feelings may not really have been their own. It explores the paradoxes of representing feelings in philosophy, aesthetic theory, gender ideology, literature, and popular sentimentality, and it argues that this period's obsession with sentimental, wayward emotion was inseparable from the dilemmas resulting from attempts to locate the origins of feelings in experience. The book shows how these (...)
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  14.  77
    Richard Sorabji (2000/2002). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Sorabji presents a ground-breaking study of ancient Greek views of the emotions and their influence on subsequent theories and attitudes, Pagan and Christian. While the central focus of the book is the Stoics, Sorabji draws on a vast range of texts to give a rich historical survey of how Western thinking about this central aspect of human nature developed.
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  15.  63
    Gary Hatfield (2007). The Passions of the Soul and Descartes's Machine Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain functionally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or material) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mechanize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he summarized in the Discourse. However, (...)
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  16.  1
    Michel Meyer (2000). Philosophy and the Passions: Toward a History of Human Nature. Penn State University Press.
    For the passions represent a force of excess and lawlessness in humanity that produces troubling, confusing paradoxes.In this book, noted European philosopher Michel Meyer offers a wide-ranging exegesis, the first of its kind, that ...
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  17. David Hume (2007). A Dissertation on the Passions. Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in 1757. In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion. The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. Authoritative critical texts are accompanied by a full array of editorial matter.
     
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  18.  27
    Jane O'Grady (2005). From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category by Thomas Dixon. Cambridge University Press, 2003, 297pp., Hb ??45.00 the Navigation of Feeling: A Framework for the History of Emotions by William M. Reddy. Cambridge University Press, 2001, 380pp., Pb ??17.99. [REVIEW] Philosophy 80 (1):156-159.
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  19. Graham Wallas (1934). Social Judgment. London, G. Allen & Unwin.
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  20.  9
    Paul Redding (1999). The Logic of Affect. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction: A Logic for the Reasons of the Heart? Creating an aphorism that would prove irresistible to many later investigators into affective life, ...
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  21. Francesco Cerrato (2012). Un Secolo Tra Politica E Passioni: Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza. Deriveapprodi.
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  22.  26
    Michael L. Frazer (2010). The Enlightenment of Sympathy: Justice and the Moral Sentiments in the Eighteenth Century and Today. Oxford University Press.
    However, other leading philosophers of the era--such as David Hume, Adam Smith, and J.G. Herder--placed greater emphasis on feeling, seeing moral and political ...
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  23.  22
    Stephen Gaukroger (ed.) (1998). The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century. Routledge.
    This book provides perspectives of the passions of the 17th century. The contributors suggest that fundamental questions about the nature of wisdom, goodness and beauty were understood in terms of the contrast between reason and passions.
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  24. Martin Harbsmeier & Sabastian Möckel (eds.) (2009). Pathos, Affekt, Emotion: Transformationen der Antike. Suhrkamp.
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  25. Giuseppe Peota (2010). Ali, Derive E Naufragi: Passioni E Utopie Nell'eredità Dell'illuminismo Francese, 1750-1789. Aracne.
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  26. Elisabetta Selmi, Luca Piantoni & Massimo Rinaldi (eds.) (2012). Il Fiore Delle Passioni: Animo E Virtù Nel Sistema Dei Saperi Tra Cinque E Seicento. Cleup.
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  27.  81
    Robert C. Solomon (2004). In Defense of Sentimentality. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy has as much to do with feelings as it does with thoughts and thinking. Philosophy, accordingly, requires not only emotional sensitivity but an understanding of the emotions, not as curious but marginal psychological phenomena but as the very substance of life. In this, the second book in a series devoted to his work on the emotions, Robert Solomon presents a defense of the emotions and of sentimentality against the background of what he perceives as a long (...)
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  28. Pierre-François Moreau (ed.) (2006). Les Passions à l'Âge Classique. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  29.  12
    Michael Ure (2009). Nietzsche's Free Spirit Trilogy and Stoic Therapy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):60-84.
    This article examines Nietzsche's engagement with Stoic philosophical therapy in the free spirit trilogy. I suggest that Nietzsche first turned to Stoicism in the late 1870s in his attempt to develop a philosophical therapy that might treat the injuries human beings suffer through fate or chance without recourse to the metaphysical theodicies discredited by Enlightenment skepticism and positivism. I argue that in HH and D Nietzsche adopts a conventional form of Stoic therapy. The article then shows how Nietzsche came to (...)
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  30.  33
    John T. Fitzgerald (ed.) (2008). Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge.
    This book contains a collection of 13 essays from leading scholars on the relationship between passionate emotions and moral advancement in Greek and Roman thought. Recognising that emotions played a key role in whether individuals lived happily, ancient philosophers extensively discussed the nature of the passions.
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  31.  4
    Peter Goldie (ed.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. OUP Oxford.
    This Handbook presents thirty-one state-of-the-art contributions from the most notable writers on philosophy of emotion today. Anyone working on the nature of emotion, its history, or its relation to reason, self, value, or art, whether at the level of research or advanced study, will find the book an unrivalled resource and a fascinating read.
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  32.  42
    Marco Solinas (2012). Review of Elena Pulcini, Invidia. La passione triste. [REVIEW] Iride (65):200-201.
  33.  12
    Henry Dyson (2006). The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):317-318.
    Henry Dyson - The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.2 317-318 Tad Brennan. The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Pp. xi + 340. Cloth, $45.00. This book is the best introductory survey of Stoic moral psychology and ethics currently available. It is divided into four main sections: a general introduction to the ancient Stoics, our historical sources, (...)
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  34.  4
    Christopher Castiglia (2008). Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy in the Antebellum United States. Duke University Press.
    "This book combines scope and depth in a way that will remind readers of some of the classics--F. O. Matthiessen, Leo Marx, Ann Douglas, Jane Tompkins.
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  35.  16
    Charland Louis C. (2010). Reinstating the Passions: Arguments From the History of Psychopathology. In Goldie Peter (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press 237-263.
    The passions have vanished. After centuries of dominance in the ethical and scientific discourse of the West, they have been eclipsed by the emotions. To speak of the passions now is to refer to a relic of the past, the crumbling foundation of a once mighty conceptual empire that permeated all aspects of Western cultural life. Philosophical and scientific wars continue to be fought in these ruins; new encampments are built, rebels plot in the catacombs, and bold (...)
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  36.  27
    Peter Kivy (1993). The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music. Cambridge University Press.
    Peter Kivy is the author of many books on the history of art and, in particular, the aesthetics of music. This collection of essays spans a period of some thirty years and focuses on a richly diverse set of issues: the biological origins of music, the role of music in the liberal education, the nature of the musical work and its performance, the aesthetics of opera, the emotions of music, and the very nature of music itself. Some of (...)
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  37. Vasso Kindi (2012). Collingwoods Opposition to Biography. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):44-59.
    Abstract Biography is usually distinguished from history and, in comparison, looked down upon. R. G. Collingwood's view of biography seems to fit this statement considering that he says it has only gossip-value and that “history it can never be“. His main concern is that biography exploits and arouses emotions which he excludes from the domain of history. In the paper I will try to show that one can salvage a more positive view of biography from within (...)
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  38.  94
    Peter Nilsson (2003). Empathy and Emotions: On the Notion of Empathy as Emotional Sharing. Dissertation, Umeå University
    The topic of this study is a notion of empathy that is common in philosophy and in the behavioral sciences. It is here referred to as ‘the notion of empathy as emotional sharing’, and it is characterized in terms of three ideas. If a person, S, has empathy with respect to an emotion of another person, O, then (i) S experiences an emotion that is similar to an emotion that O is currently having, (ii) S’s emotion is caused, in a (...)
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  39. Jesse Prinz (2004). Emotions Embodied. In R. Solomon (ed.), Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press
    In one of the most frequently quoted passages in the history of emotion research, William James (1884: 189f) announces that emotions occur when the perception of an exciting fact causes a collection of bodily changes, and “our feeling of the same changes as they occur IS the emotion.” The same idea occurred to Carl Lange (1984) around the same time. These authors were not the first to draw a link between the emotions and the body. Indeed, this (...)
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  40. Jesse J. Prinz (2007). The Emotional Construction of Morals. Oxford University Press.
    Jesse Prinz argues that recent work in philosophy, neuroscience, and anthropology supports two radical hypotheses about the nature of morality: moral values are based on emotional responses, and these emotional responses are inculcated by culture, not hard-wired through natural selection. In the first half of the book, Jesse Prinz defends the hypothesis that morality has an emotional foundation. Evidence from brain imaging, social psychology, and psychopathology suggest that, when we judge something to be right or wrong, we are merely expressing (...)
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  41.  67
    Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1978). Explaining Emotions. Journal of Philosophy 75 (March):139-161.
    The challenge of explaining the emotions has engaged the attention of the best minds in philosophy and science throughout history. Part of the fascination has been that the emotions resist classification. As adequate account therefore requires receptivity to knowledge from a variety of sources. The philosopher must inform himself of the relevant empirical investigation to arrive at a definition, and the scientist cannot afford to be naive about the assumptions built into his conceptual apparatus. The contributors to (...)
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  42. Jon Elster (2002). [Book Review] Alchemies of the Mind, Rationality and the Emotions. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (2):371-375.
    Jon Elster has written a comprehensive, wide-ranging book on the emotions in which he considers the full range of theoretical approaches. Drawing on history, literature, philosophy and psychology, Elster presents a complete account of the role of the emotions in human behaviour. While acknowledging the importance of neurophysiology and laboratory experiment for the study of emotions, Elster argues that the serious student of the emotions can learn more from the great thinkers and writers of the (...)
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  43. Claudia M. Schmidt (2003). David Hume: Reason in History. Penn State University Press.
    In his seminal _Philosophy of David Hume_, Norman Kemp Smith called for a study of Hume "in all his manifold activities: as philosopher, as political theorist, as economist, as historian, and as man of letters," indicating that "Hume's philosophy, as the attitude of mind that found for itself these various forms of expression, will then have been presented, adequately and in due perspective, for the first time." Claudia Schmidt seeks to address this long-standing need in Hume scholarship. Against the (...)
     
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  44. Jon Elster (1998). Alchemies of the Mind: Rationality and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    Jon Elster has written a comprehensive, wide-ranging book on the emotions in which he considers the full range of theoretical approaches. Drawing on history, literature, philosophy and psychology, Elster presents a complete account of the role of the emotions in human behaviour. While acknowledging the importance of neurophysiology and laboratory experiment for the study of emotions, Elster argues that the serious student of the emotions can learn more from the great thinkers and writers of the (...)
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  45. Jon Elster (2012). Alchemies of the Mind: Rationality and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    Jon Elster has written a comprehensive, wide-ranging book on the emotions in which he considers the full range of theoretical approaches. Drawing on history, literature, philosophy and psychology, Elster presents a complete account of the role of the emotions in human behaviour. While acknowledging the importance of neurophysiology and laboratory experiment for the study of emotions, Elster argues that the serious student of the emotions can learn more from the great thinkers and writers of the (...)
     
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  46. Aaron Garrett (ed.) (2014). The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge.
    The Eighteenth century is one of the most important periods in the history of Western philosophy, witnessing philosophical, scientific, and social and political change on a vast scale. In spite of this, there are few single volume overviews of the philosophy of the period as a whole. The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy is an authoritative survey and assessment of this momentous period, covering major thinkers, topics and movements in Eighteenth century philosophy. Beginning with a substantial introduction by (...)
     
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  47. Aaron Garrett (ed.) (2014). The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge.
    The Eighteenth century is one of the most important periods in the history of Western philosophy, witnessing philosophical, scientific, and social and political change on a vast scale. In spite of this, there are few single volume overviews of the philosophy of the period as a whole. _The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy _is an authoritative survey and assessment of this momentous period, covering major thinkers, topics and movements in Eighteenth century philosophy. Beginning with a substantial introduction by (...)
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  48. Claudia M. Schmidt (2004). David Hume: Reason in History. Penn State University Press.
    In his seminal _Philosophy of David Hume_, Norman Kemp Smith called for a study of Hume "in all his manifold activities: as philosopher, as political theorist, as economist, as historian, and as man of letters," indicating that "Hume's philosophy, as the attitude of mind that found for itself these various forms of expression, will then have been presented, adequately and in due perspective, for the first time." Claudia Schmidt seeks to address this long-standing need in Hume scholarship. Against the charges (...)
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  49. Tom Stern (2013). Philosophy and Theatre: An Introduction. Routledge.
    The relationship between philosophy and theatre is a central theme in the writings of Plato and Aristotle and of dramatists from Aristophanes to Stoppard. Where Plato argued that playwrights and actors should be banished from the ideal city for their suspect imitations of reality, Aristotle argued that theatre, particularly tragedy, was vital for stimulating our emotions and helping us to understanding ourselves. Despite this rich history the study of philosophy and theatre has been largely overlooked in contemporary philosophy. (...)
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  50.  8
    Thomas McNally (forthcoming). More Than a Feeling: Wittgenstein and William James on Love and Other Emotions. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    ABSTRACTOne of the most significant features of Wittgenstein's Remarks on the Philosophy of Psychology is his reflections on emotions. Wittgenstein's treatment of this topic was developed in direct response to his reading of William James’s chapter on emotions in his 1890 masterpiece, The Principles of Psychology. This paper examines the competing views of emotions that emerge in these works, both of which attempt to overcome the Cartesian dualist conception in different ways. The main point of disagreement concerns (...)
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