Search results for 'End of the world' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Peter Loptson (2007). Re-Examining the 'End of History' Idea and World History Since Hegel. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:175-182.score: 226.5
    This paper offers an analysis of central features of modern world history which suggest a confirmation, and extension, of something resembling Fukuyama's Kojeve-Hegel *end of history' thesis. As is well known, Kojeve interpreted Hegel as having argued that in a meaningful sense history, as struggle and endeavour to achieve workable stasis in the mutual relations of selves and state-society collectivities, literally came to an end with Napoleon's 1806 victory at the battle of Jena. That victory led to the establishment (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Edmund Taylor Whittaker (1943). The Beginning and End of the World. London, Oxford University Press, H. Milford.score: 211.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Victoria S. Harrison (2005). The Metamorphosis of “the End of the World”: From Theology to Philosophy and Back Again. Philosophy and Theology 17 (1/2):33-50.score: 204.0
    This paper highlights certain features of the metamorphosis that the concept “the end of the world” has undergone from its origin in early Christian thought to the present day. This concept has, in recent decades, become increasingly prominent within Western European Lutheran and Roman Catholic theology. This paperdemonstrates that the notion of the end of the world popularized by Jürgen Moltmann and Karl Rahner, despite the traditional, biblical language in which it is couched, has more affinity with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Leslie (1996). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.score: 204.0
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Josef Pieper (1999/1982). The End of Time: A Meditation on the Philosophy of History. Ignatius Press.score: 201.0
    This is a work by Josef Pieper, one of this century's most profound and lucid expositors of the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Josef Pieper (1954). The End of Time. London, Faber and Faber.score: 201.0
    This is a work by Josef Pieper, one of this century's most profound and lucid expositors of the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gonzalo Munévar (2011). Venus and the end of the world [Spanish]. Eidos 4:10-25.score: 193.5
    Resumen Este artículo busca demostrar que los argumentos generales acerca de la exploración científica valen también para las ciencias espaciales. El trabajo se basa en el ejemplo de la exploración de Venus y lo que esta nos dice acerca de nuestro propio planeta. Argumenta que el concepto de la probabilidad de Leslie es incorrecto, como también lo son las dudas sobre la evidencia Venusiana. Así mismo, concluye que no se puede rechazar la importancia que tienen los descubrimientos inesperados que han (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Umberto Eco, Catherine David, Frédéric Lenoir & Jean-Philippe de Tonnac (eds.) (2000). Conversations About the End of Time. Fromm International.score: 187.5
    Umberto Eco -- Stephen Jay Gould -- Jean-Claude Carrière -- Jean Delumeau.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. María del Mar Ramírez Alvarado (2013). Images of the end of the world: The Apocalypse in the Xylographies by the german Artist Alberto Durero. Alpha (Osorno) 36:159-176.score: 182.3
    Este trabajo profundiza en un momento importante en la historia de la comunicación como lo fue el de la difusión de la imprenta y el desarrollo de las técnicas del grabado aplicadas a la impresión. Se estudian las imágenes del libro bíblico del Apocalipsis, ilustrado por el artista alemán Alberto Durero a finales del siglo XV. Para ello se ha ahondando en el contexto histórico en el que fueron producidas, en la personalidad y circunstancias que rodearon la vida del artista (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Aviv Hoffmann (2011). It's Not the End of the World: When a Subtraction Argument for Metaphysical Nihilism Fails. Analysis 71 (1):44-53.score: 181.5
    Metaphysical nihilism is the thesis that there could have been no concrete objects. Thomas Baldwin (1996) offers an argument for metaphysical nihilism. The premisses of the argument purport to provide a procedure of subtraction that can be iterated until we reach a world where no concrete objects exist. Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (1997) finds fault with Baldwin’s argument, modifies it, and claims to have proved metaphysical nihilism. My primary aim is to show that Rodriguez-Pereyra’s alleged proof rests on a false assumption. (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Eran Guter (2004). Where Languages End: Ludwig Wittgenstein at the Crossroads of Music, Language, and the World. Dissertation, Boston Universityscore: 177.0
    Most commentators have underplayed the philosophical importance of Wittgenstein's multifarious remarks on music, which are scattered throughout his Nachlass. In this dissertation I spell out the extent and depth of Wittgenstein's engagement with certain problems that are regarded today as central to the field of the aesthetics of music, such as musical temporality, expression and understanding. By considering musical expression in its relation to aspect-perception, I argue that Wittgenstein understands music in terms of a highly evolved, vertically complex physiognomic language-game, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Dun Zhang (2010). “The End of History ” and the Fate of the Philosophy of History. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):631-651.score: 174.8
    The end of history by Fukuyama is mainly based on Hegel’s treatise of the end of history and Kojeve’s corresponding interpretation. But Hegel’s end of history is a purely philosophical question, i.e., an ontological premise that must be fulfilled to complete absolute knowledge. When Kojeve further demonstrates its universal and homogeneous state, Fukuyama extends it into a political view: The victory of the Western system of freedom and democracy marks the end of the development of human history and Marxist theory (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.score: 174.8
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; vision without (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Bruno Lessard (2010). 'It's the End of the World!': The Paradox of Event and Body in Hitchcock's The Birds. Film-Philosophy 14 (1):144-173.score: 172.5
    This article examines the concept of ‘event’ and the manner in which it has been neglected in both ecocriticism and Hitchcock studies. Using The Birds (1963) to rethink the premises of ecocritics’ discussion of nature, animals, and disasters in cinema and Hitchcock scholars’ emphasis on representation and symbolism, the article argues that it has become imperative to philosophically foreground ‘events’ in light of the numerous contemporary films that revolve around them. Hitchcock’s film is shown to propose a renewed concept of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Marianna Papadopoulou & Roy Birch (2009). 'Being in the World': The Event of Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):270-286.score: 171.0
    This paper employs an eclectic mix of paradigms in order to discuss constituting characteristics of young children's learning experiences. Drawing upon a phenomenological perspective it examines learning as a form of 'Being' and as the result of learners' engagement with the world in their own, unique, intentional manners. The learners' intentions towards their world are expressed in everyday activity and participation. A social constructivist perspective is thus employed to present learning as situated in meaningful socio-cultural contexts of the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Kyle Johnson (forthcoming). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia:1-19.score: 171.0
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Albertas Milinis, Agnė Baranskaitė & Armanas Abramavičius (2011). Problematic Aspects of the Beginning and end of Human Life in the Context of Homicide (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):1123-1143.score: 171.0
    Both in criminal law science and in the judicial practice there are a lot of discussions as to what should be considered as the beginning and end of human life. Birth and death are not instantaneous acts, but rather processes made up of time-spans that can be construed as evidence of the beginning or end of a human life. From a biological point of view the human life is a constant, continuous metabolic process after cessation of which the human life (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. T. H. Ho (2014). Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.score: 166.5
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Roger Ruston (1989). A Say in the End of the World: Morals and British Nuclear Weapons Policy 1941-1987. Clarendon Press.score: 166.5
    More than forty years of commitment to nuclear weapons may have prepared Britain to take part in Armageddon, but not to defend itself against attack. What made British governments choose this path and how have they justified it? How have they responded to the moral questions it raises? -/- Using material from recently-released official documents, Roger Ruston presents a moral history of British defence policy, from the 'lesson' of Appeasement to the nuclear modernizations of the eighties, and answers many of (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. W. Becker (1998). The Bankruptcy of Marxism. About the Historical End of a World Philosophy. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 60:431-442.score: 164.3
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Karl-Siegbert Rehberg (2009). Philosophical Anthropology From the End of World War I to the 1940s and in a Current Perspective. Iris 1 (1):131-152.score: 162.0
    The first part of the article discusses the conditions under which the “school” of thought known as “philosophical anthropology” arose and the relevance today of the problems it posed, concluding with a look at the recent prevalence taken by biological research. The second part examines the conceptions advanced by its leading figures, Max Scheler, Helmuth Plessner and Arnold Gehlen, and shows how each of them contributed to a “sociologization of anthropological knowledge.” On the basis of this analysis, philosophical anthropology proves (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Petru Moldovan (2010). Bryan Rennie (Ed.), Changing Religious Worlds. The Meaning and End of Mircea Eliade. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (8):130-134.score: 160.0
    Bryan Rennie (ed.), Changing Religious Worlds. The Meaning and End of Mircea Eliade State University of New York Press, Albany, 2001.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman (2010). Creating the Past: Schelling's Ages of the World. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (1):23-43.score: 159.8
  24. W. U. Xiaoming (2012). The End of the Supersensory World's Mythology: Marx's Ontological Revolution and Its Contemporary Significance. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (1):128-141.score: 159.8
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jukka Vuorinen (2007). Ethical Codes in the Digital World: Comparisons of the Proprietary, the Open/Free and the Cracker System. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):27-38.score: 159.0
    The digital world provides various ethical frames for individuals to become ethical subjects. In this paper I examine – in a Foucauldian and Luhmannian way – the differences between three systems of communication: the proprietary, the open/free and the cracker system. It is argued that all three systems provide a different set of ethical codes which one can be subjected to. The language of each system is restricted and they cannot understand each other, they merely consider each other as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Hugh Lehman (1998). John Leslie, the End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):63-65.score: 156.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Steven Schroeder (1992). It's the End of the World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine): "The End of History," Marxist Eschatology, and the "New World Order". Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):127-141.score: 156.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. M. Wintroub (1999). Taking Stock at the End of the World: Rites of Distinction and Practices of Collecting in Early Modern Europe. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 30 (3):395-424.score: 156.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Quentin Smith (1998). The End Of The World. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):413-434.score: 156.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Adrian Tronson (2005). Alexander at the End of the World F. L. Holt: Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions . (Hellenistic Culture and Society 44.) Pp. Xvi + 198, Maps, Ills, Pls. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 2003. Cased, US$24.95, £16.95. ISBN: 0-520-23881-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):228-.score: 156.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jean Kazez (2009). Twittering the End of the World. The Philosophers' Magazine 46:116-117.score: 156.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert Whelan (1992). It's Not the End of the World. The Chesterton Review 18 (3):428-429.score: 156.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. M. J. Hannush (2002). Nicholsen, Shierry Weber (2001). The Love of Nature and the End of the World: The Unspoken Dimensions of Environmental Concern. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (2):283-292.score: 156.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ingmar Persson (2013). From Morality to the End of Reason: An Essay on Rights, Reasons and Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 154.5
    Many philosophers think that if you're morally responsible for a state of affairs, you must be a cause of it. Ingmar Persson argues that this strand of common sense morality is asymmetrical, in that it features the act-omission doctrine, according to which there are stronger reasons against performing some harmful actions than in favour of performing any beneficial actions. He analyses the act-omission doctrine as consisting in a theory of negative rights, according to which there are rights not to have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Joris Gielen, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert (2009). The Operationalisation of Religion and World View in Surveys of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):423-431.score: 154.5
    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses’ attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Browning (1967). World's End Santo Mazzarino: The End of the Ancient World. Pp. 198. London: Faber, 1966. Cloth, 30s. Net. The Classical Review 17 (01):88-89.score: 153.8
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Clarissa Kwasniewski (2000). The End of the Modern World, by Romano Guardini. The Chesterton Review 26 (1/2):182-184.score: 153.8
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Mary Siani-Davies (1995). T. Wiedemann: Cicero and the End of the Roman Republic. (Classical World Series.) Pp. X+92; 21 Figs. London: Bristol Classical Press, 1994. Paper £6.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (01):190-191.score: 153.8
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. G. K. Chesterton (1984). At the Sign of the World's End. The Chesterton Review 10 (3):237-241.score: 153.8
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert J. Deltete (2009). The End of the Certain World: The Life and Science of Max Born, the Nobel Scientist Who Ignited the Quantum Revolution. Annals of Science 66 (3):433-436.score: 153.8
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. P. Weindling (1998). World in Crisis. The Politics of Survival at the End of the Twentieth Century. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (1):67-68.score: 153.8
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Leslie (1990). Is the End of the World Nigh? Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):65-72.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Antony Flew (1997). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction By Leslie John Routledge, 1996, Vii+310 Pp. £16.99. [REVIEW] Philosophy 72 (279):158-.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kent A. Peacock (1999). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction John Leslie New York: Routledge, 1996, Vii + 310 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):650-.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. Jesse Ramírez (forthcoming). Žižek's Apocalypse: The End of the World or the End of Capitalism? Theory and Event 13 (4).score: 153.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Douglas J. Schuurman (forthcoming). Book Review: Living Beyond the “End of the World”: A Spirituality of Hope. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (2):215-216.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Richard K. Emmerson (2008). David McKitterick, Nigel Morgan, Ian Short, and Teresa Webber, The Trinity Apocalypse (Trinity College Cambridge, MS R. 16.2). London: British Library; Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005. Pp. Xv, 173 Plus 24 Color Plates and 1 CD-ROM (PC and Mac); 133 Black-and-White Figures and 1 Diagram. Nigel Morgan, The Douce Apocalypse: Picturing the End of the World in the Middle Ages.(Treasures From the Bodleian Library.) Oxford: Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, 2006. Pp. 115; 73 Black-and-White and Color Figures. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (2):467-468.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Geoffrey Gorham (1998). John Leslie, The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (2):122-124.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Bruno Petrušić (2012). How Do We See the End of the World? Disputatio Philosophica 13 (1):33-38.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Erik D. Baldwin (2008). How to Be Happy After the End of the World. In Jason T. Eberl (ed.), Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 153.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000