Search results for 'Enlightenment (Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  22
    David Loy (1982). Enlightenment in Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta. International Philosophical Quarterly 22 (1):65-74.
    Buddhism, By denying the subject, And advaita, By denying the object, Both resolve the problematic subject-Object relationship. That they are mirror-Images suggests that "nirvana" and "moksha" might amount to the same thing-Nonduality. "there is no self" equals "everything is the self." buddhism emphasizes "sunyata" because it is a phenomenological description of enlightenment. Advaita speaks of monistic "brahman" because it is a philosophical attempt to describe reality from the fictional "outside.".
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  2.  20
    Charles Muller, The Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment: Korean Buddhism's Guide to Meditation.
    These, and many other related questions have continued to rise in the minds of meditation practitioners of Chan, Sôn and Zen Buddhism since the earliest stages in the development of these traditions, and it is in response to such questions that the Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment was composed. In addition to detailed guidance on the undertaking of Chan contemplation, the sutra offers concise discussions of the fundamental philosophical grounds which underlie such practices, in the form of question and answer (...)
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  3. Charles Muller, Innate Enlightenment and No-Thought: A Response to the Critical Buddhist Position on Zen.
    Prof. Matsumoto Shirō and his colleague, Prof. Hakamaya Noriaki, have together produced a number of lengthy essays on a theme called hihan bukkyō (批判仏教), in English, "Critical Buddhism."1 At the core of their project is the conviction that the concepts of tathāgatagarbha and innate enlightenment (本覺思想) are alien to Buddhism, due to the fact that those concepts imply a belief in a hypostasized self--a type of atman, which Buddhism originally and distinctively sought to refute through the conceptual framework of (...)
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  4. Pamela D. Winfield (2013). Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kukai and Dogen on the Art of Enlightenment. OUP Usa.
    Pamela D. Winfield offers a fascinating juxtaposition and comparison of the thoughts of two pre-modern Japanese Buddhist masters, Kukai (774-835) and Dogen (1200-1253) on the role of imagery in the enlightenment experience.
     
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  5. Dale S. Wright (2016). What is Buddhist Enlightenment? Oxford University Press Usa.
    What kind of person should I strive to be? What ideals should I pursue in my life? These questions, or versions of them, are essential building blocks of the human condition, and often recur throughout our lives. Dale S. Wright argues that the question at the heart of them all is one most commonly associated with Buddhism: What is enlightenment? Any serious practitioner of human life, religious or not, confronts the challenge of how to reach a different, improved--or enlightened--state (...)
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  6. Peter Della Santina (1997). The Tree of Enlightenment: An Introduction to the Major Traditions of Buddhism. Singapore Buddhist Mediation Centre.
     
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  7. Tom Lowenstein (2011). Buddhist Inspirations: Essential Philosophy, Truth and Enlightenment. Watkins Publishing.
    Life and insights -- Wisdom's echoes -- Healing practices -- Sacred symbolism -- Spiritual cosmos.
     
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  8. Patricia Sharp (2011). Buddhist Enlightenment and the Destruction of Attractor Networks: A Neuroscientific Speculation on the Buddhist Path From Everyday Consciousness to Buddha-Awakening. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):3-4.
    Buddhist philosophy asserts that human suffering is caused by ignorance regarding the true nature of reality. According to this, perceptions and thoughts are largely fabrications of our own minds, based on conditioned tendencies which often involve problematic fears, aversions, compulsions, etc. In Buddhist psychology, these tendencies reside in a portion of mind known as Store consciousness. Here, I suggest a correspondence between this Buddhist Store consciousness and the neuroscientific idea of stored synaptic weights. These weights are strong synaptic connections built (...)
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  9.  5
    Don Adams (2015). The Enlightenment of Fu Manchu: Buddhism and Western Detective Fiction. Contemporary Buddhism 16 (2):245-266.
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  10.  10
    Rita M. Gross (2006). Being a Buddhist Nun: The Struggle for Enlightenment in the Himalayas, And: Himalayan Hermitess: The Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Nun (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 26 (1):220-223.
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  11.  4
    Yasuaki Nara (forthcoming). May the Deceased Get Enlightenment! An Aspect of the Enculturation of Buddhism in Japan. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  12.  6
    Paul L. Swanson (2000). Book Review: Jacqueline Stone, Original Enlightenment and the Transformation of Medieval Japanese Buddhism. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 27 (1-2):115-117.
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  13.  2
    Victor Forte (2015). Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment by Pamela D. Winfield. Philosophy East and West 65 (2):647-650.
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  14.  2
    Marion L. Matics (1974). Entering the Path of Enlightenment: The Bodhicaryāvatāra of the Buddhist Poet Śāntideva. Philosophy East and West 24 (3):373-376.
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  15.  14
    Keith Yandell (1997). Persons (Real and Alleged) in Enlightenment Traditions: A Partial Look at Jainism and Buddhism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 42 (1):23-39.
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  16.  9
    Whalen W. Lai (1978). Illusionism (Māyavāda) in Late T'ang Buddhism: A Hypothesis on the Philosophical Roots of the Round Enlightenment Sūtra (Yüan-Chüeh-Ching). Philosophy East and West 28 (1):39-51.
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  17.  3
    Chris Gudmunsen (1972). Entering the Path of Enlightenment. The Bodhicaryāvatāra of the Buddhist Poet Śantideva, Translated by Marion L. Matics. Pp. 232 + Appendices. £4·50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 8 (4):373.
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  18.  1
    Brook Ziporyn (1998). Review of Liberating Intimacy: Enlightenment and Social Virtuosity in Ch'an Buddhism by Peter D. Hershock. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 48 (2):366-368.
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  19. Sung Bae Park (1985). Buddhist Faith and Sudden Enlightenment. Philosophy East and West 35 (1):102-104.
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  20. Frank J. Hoffman (1985). Sung Bae Park. Buddhist Faith and Sudden Enlightenment. Pp. 211. (New York: State University of New York Press, 1983.) SUNY Series in Religious Studies.Steve Odin. Process Metaphysics and Hua-Yen Buddhism. Pp. 242. (New York: State University of New York Press, 1982.) SUNY Series in Systematic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 21 (3):439-441.
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  21. Eric Haruki Swanson (2014). Review Of: Pamela D. Winfield, Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 41 (2).
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  22. Dave S. Henley (2015). The Logic of Enlightenment. Iff Books.
    This work proposes a logical analysis for the kind of knowledge or insight provided by spiritual enlightenment, which is often presented only in the form of contradictions and riddles. The comprehension of contradictions is perplexing to most western logic, and yet developed here is a theory demonstrating how a non truth-functional interpretation can be attached to certain naturalistic contradictions. In this way, the logical and psychological status of Enlightenment can be analysed in a manner consistent with the claims (...)
     
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  23.  19
    Jeson Woo (2009). Gradual and Sudden Enlightenment: The Attainment of Yogipratyakṣa in the Later Indian Yogācāra School. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (2):179-188.
    In the later Indian Yogācāra school, yogipratyakṣa, the cognition of yogins is a key concept used to explain the Buddhist goal of enlightenment. It arises through the practice of meditation upon the Four Noble Truths. The method of the practice is to contemplate their aspects with attention (sādara), without interruption (nairantarya), and over a long period of time (dīrghakāla). A problem occurs in this position since Buddhists hold the theory of momentariness: how is possible that a yogin attains yogipratyakṣa (...)
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  24. Hsin-Chun Huang (2009). Epistemological Approach to Chán Enlightenment: A Philosophical Study. Eastern Book Linkers.
     
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  25.  15
    Joan Marques (2012). Consciousness at Work: A Review of Some Important Values, Discussed From a Buddhist Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):27-40.
    This article reviews the element of consciousness from a Buddhist and a non-Buddhist (Western) perspective. Within the Buddhist perspective, two practices toward attaining expanded and purified consciousness will be included: the Seven-Point Mind Training and Vipassana. Within the Western perspective, David Hawkins’ works on consciousness will be used as a main guide. In addition, a number of important concepts that contribute to expanded and purified consciousness will be presented. Among these concepts are impermanence, karma, non-harming (ahimsa), ethics, kindness and compassion, (...)
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  26.  16
    Colette Sciberras (2010). Buddhist Philosophy and the Ideals of Environmentalism. Dissertation, Durham University
    I examine the consistency between contemporary environmentalist ideals and Buddhist philosophy, focusing, first, on the problem of value in nature. I argue that the teachings found in the Pāli canon cannot easily be reconciled with a belief in the intrinsic value of life, whether human or otherwise. This is because all existence is regarded as inherently unsatisfactory, and all beings are seen as impermanent and insubstantial, while the ultimate spiritual goal is often viewed, in early Buddhism, as involving a deep (...)
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  27.  33
    Nalini Bhushan (2008). Toward an Anatomy of Mourning: Discipline, Devotion and Liberation in a Freudian-Buddhist Framework. Sophia 47 (1):57-69.
    In this essay I first articulate what I take to be an influential and for the most part persuasive model in the western psychoanalytic tradition that is a response to tragic loss, namely, the one that we find in Freud’s little essay entitled ‘Mourning and Melancholia’ (1917). I then use a well-known Buddhist folk tale about the plight of a young woman named Kisagotami to underscore central elements from Buddhist psychology on the subject of suffering that is a consequence of (...)
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  28.  7
    Traleg Kyabgon (2001). The Essence of Buddhism: An Introduction to its Philosophy and Practice. Shambhala.
    This lucid overview of the Buddhist path takes the perspective of the three "vehicles" of Tibetan Buddhism: the Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana. While these vehicles are usually presented as a historical development, they are here equated with the attitudes that individuals bring to their Buddhist practice. Basic to them all, however, is the need to understand our own immediate condition. The primary tool for achieving this is meditation, and The Essence of Buddhism serves as a handbook for the various meditative (...)
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  29.  1
    Paul Williams (1992). Non-Conceptuality, Critical Reasoning and Religious Experience: Some Tibetan Buddhist Discussions. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:189-210.
    The Dalai Lama is fond of quoting a verse attributed to the Buddha to the effect that as the wise examine carefully gold by burning, cutting and polishing it, so the Buddha's followers should embrace his words after examining them critically and not just out of respect for the Master. A role for critical thought has been accepted by all Buddhists, although during two and a half millennia of sophisticated doctrinal development the exact nature, role and range of critical thought (...)
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  30. Brahmadevanārāyaṇa Śarma (2007). Bauddhamanovijñāna. Sampūrṇānanda Saṃskr̥ta Viśvavidyālaya.
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  31.  31
    J. J. Clarke (1997). Oriental Enlightenment: The Encounter Between Asian and Western Thought. Routledge.
    The West has long had an ambivalent attitude toward the philosophical traditions of the East. Voltaire claimed that the East is the civilization "to which the West owes everything", yet C.S. Peirce was contemptuous of the "monstrous mysticism of the East". And despite the current trend toward globalizations, there is still a reluctance to take seriously the intellectual inheritance of South and East Asia. Oriental Enlightenment challenges this Eurocentric prejudice. J. J. Clarke examines the role played by the ideas (...)
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  32.  33
    Donna M. Giancola, Buddhist Doctrines of Identity and Impermanence in the Western Mind.
    In Buddhism the idea of a transcendental or eternal self is denied as non-substantial and impermanent: a non-verifiable metaphysical entity that leads to grasping, craving and suffering. Buddhism posits that things continually change, are continually reducible and recyclable, and that no inherent existence or metaphysical “self” exists but rather a series of aggregates give rise to the experience so that consciousness itself is causally conditioned. As applied to the notion of no- self the one who is reborn and the one (...)
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  33.  22
    Steve Bein (2008). Self Power, Other Power, and Non-Dualism in Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:7-13.
    A traditional distinction is made in scholarship on Japanese Buddhism between two means for attaining enlightenment: jiriki 自力, or "self power," and tariki 他力, or "other power." Dōgen's Sōtō Zen is the paradigmatic example of a jiriki school: according to Dōgen, one attains enlightenment through strenuous zazen and rigorous ascetic practices. Shinran's Jōdo Shin Buddhism is the paradigmatic example of a tariki school: according to Shinran, human beings are incapable of self-salvation, but by chanting the nembutsu they can (...)
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  34.  36
    Carissa Véliz, The 3rd World Conference on Buddhism and Science (WCBS).
    The term mindfulness has become increasingly popular in the West due, in no small part, to contemporary studies of mindfulness-based therapies in psychology. According to the Pali Nik?yas, mindfulness practice is the heart of Buddhism, for it alone can lead one to enlightenment. However, are contemporary and traditional accounts of the practice of mindfulness referring to the same technique? In this paper I will argue that modern accounts of mindfulness in the field of psychology omit important features of the (...)
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  35.  40
    Michael P. Levine (2003). Can the Concept of Enlightenment Evolve? Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):115 – 129.
    Those who claim the concept of enlightenment (nibānna) has not evolved must rest their claim on a strong distinction between changing and variant interpretations of the concept on the one hand, and what the term really means or refers to on the other. This paper examines whether all evolution of the concept of enlightenment is best seen as interpretive variation rather than as embodying real notional change - a change in the reference of the term. It is implausible (...)
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  36.  17
    Gordon Fraser Davis (2013). Moral Realism and Anti-Realism Outside the West: A Meta-Ethical Turn in Buddhist Ethics. Comparative Philosophy 4 (2).
    In recent years, discussions of Buddhist ethics have increasingly drawn upon the concepts and tools of modern ethical theory, not only to compare Buddhist perspectives with Western moral theories, but also to assess the meta-ethical implications of Buddhist texts and their philosophical context. Philosophers aiming to defend the Madhyamaka framework in particular – its ethics and soteriology along with its logic and epistemology – have recently attempted to explain its combination of moral commitment and philosophical scepticism by appealing to various (...)
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  37.  11
    Donald W. Mitchell (1980). Faith in Zen Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):183-197.
    There is an impression among western students of zen buddhism that faith does not play an important role in the zen tradition. This paper argues that in fact faith does have an important function in zen. The analysis relates this function to both the distinctly intuitive nature of enlightenment and the practice of meditation. The thesis is that these two phenomena can be more fully understood when related to the phenomenon of faith rather than simply distinguished from faith. Faith (...)
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  38.  37
    Ron Epstein, The Inner Ecology: Buddhist Ethics and Practice.
    Buddhists call Buddhism the Buddha Dharma: the Dharma, a collection of methods for getting enlightened, taught by a Buddha, a Fully Enlightened One. Buddhists refer to themselves as people who have taken refuge with the Three Jewels: 1) the Buddhas or Fully Enlightened Ones, 2) the Dharma or methods taught for reaching enlightenment, 3) and the Sangha or community of Buddhist monks and nuns, called Bhikshus and Bhikshunis. In formally becoming a Buddhist one becomes a disciple of a Buddhist (...)
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  39.  6
    Toji Kamata (2008). A Study of Relationship Between Shinto and Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:113-118.
    In complete distinction to the world or universal religions like Christianity and Buddhism, Shinto is an ethnic religion that has grown out of the history and culture of the Japanese people. Shinto is a way of prayer and festivals that arose from a feeling of awe and reverence towards those entities the Japanese feared and respected as "KAMA (gods, divinities)", whereas Buddhism is a system of belief and practice leading to realization and the attainment of Buddhahood. We can highlight the (...)
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  40.  15
    R. K. Payne (1987). The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
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  41.  17
    Charles Smith (2007). Deception Meets Enlightenment: From a Viable Theory of Deception to a Quirk About Humanity's Potential. World Futures 63 (1):42 – 54.
    This article seeks to further suggestions made by C. West Churchman that a full inquiry into human systems requires a viable theory of deception. It argues that such a theory of deception requires an understanding of deception, a recognition of errors in perception, and an ability to see simultaneously from competing points of view. The intent here is to provide some insights that are useful in our understanding of deception, and thereby contributing to a viable theory of deception. Insights are (...)
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  42.  2
    Yong Zhi (2013). The Poetic Transmission of Zen Buddhism. Asian Culture and History 5 (2):p25.
    This paper intends to understand the experience of enlightenment in Zen Buddhism from a perspective of poetics. Enlightenment is understood as an existential breakthrough, which delivers people from the habitual or conventional mind set into new horizon of consciousness. This breakthrough takes place in one’s overall consciousness rather than only in cognitive thought. Therefore, it cannot be adequately described on an abstract level with a conceptual paradigm. The poetic language provides a significant alternative for capturing this leap and (...)
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  43.  2
    Heesoon Bai & Avraham Cohen (2014). Zen and the Art of Storytelling. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):597-608.
    This paper explores the contribution of Zen storytelling to moral education. First, an understanding of Zen practice, what it is and how it is achieved, is established. Second, the connection between Zen practice and ethics is shown in terms of the former’s ability to cultivate moral emotions and actions. It is shown that Zen practice works at the roots of consciousness where, according to the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, the possibility of human goodness, known as bodhicitta , lies. Third, it (...)
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  44. Richard P. Boyle (2015). Realizing Awakened Consciousness: Interviews with Buddhist Teachers and a New Perspective on the Mind. Cup.
    If, as Buddhism claims, the potential for awakening exists in all human beings, we should be able to map the phenomenon with the same science we apply to other forms of consciousness. A student of cognitive social science and a Zen practitioner for more than forty years, Richard P. Boyle brings his sophisticated perspective to bear on the development of a theoretical model for both ordinary and awakened consciousness. Boyle conducts probing interviews with eleven prominent Western Buddhist teachers and one (...)
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  45. Janet Gyatso (2015). Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet. Cup.
    Critically exploring medical thought in a cultural milieu with no discernible influence from the European Enlightenment, _Being Human_ reveals an otherwise unnoticed intersection of early modern sensibilities and religious values in traditional Tibetan medicine. It further studies the adaptation of Buddhist concepts and values to medical concerns and suggests important dimensions of Buddhism's role in the development of Asian and global civilization. Through its unique focus and sophisticated reading of source materials,_ Being Human_ adds a crucial chapter in the (...)
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  46. Geshe Kelsang Gyatso (2010). Buddhism in the Tibetan Tradition: A Guide. Routledge.
    A clear and straightforward introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, this book presents the basic teachings of Buddha in a way that people can readily comprehend and put into practice in their daily lives. Topics such as reincarnation, actions and their effects, emptiness, liberation and enlightenment are discussed. Designed primarily for those coming to the subject for the first time, the book also offers new insights for the more advanced student of Tibetan Buddhism. Originally published in 1989.
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  47.  9
    Joe Bransford Wilson (1996). The Monk as Bodhisattva: A Tibetan Integration of Buddhist Moral Points of View. Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):377-402.
    Tsong kha pa's Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, completed in 1402, set the agenda in regard to the nature of and role for morality, meditation, and a correct understanding of ultimate reality for many Tibetan Buddhist thinkers and practitioners. The arguments move from reliance on scriptural authority to reliance on personal investigation, in the beginning by logic, but in the end by meditative insight. However, the model of the ascetic monastic remains basic, providing little justification for claims by (...)
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  48.  64
    Bradford Cokelet (2006). Kant and Karma. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 12.
    Adding to growing debate about the role of rebirth in Buddhist ethics, Dale S. Wright has recently advocated distinguishing and distancing the concept of karma from that of rebirth. In this paper, I evaluate Wright’s arguments in the light of Immanuel Kant’s views about supernatural beliefs. Although Kant is a paradigmatic Enlightenment critic of metaphysical speculation and traditional dogmas, he also offers thought-provoking practical arguments in favor of adopting supernatural (theistic) beliefs. In the light of Kant’s views, I argue (...)
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  49.  3
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2005). The General and the Master: The Subtext of the Philosophy of Emotion and its Relationship to Obtaining Enlightenment in the Platform Sutra. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:213-229.
  50. Gyalwang Drukpa (2012). Everyday Enlightenment: The Essential Guide to Finding Happiness in the Modern World. Riverhead Hardcover.
     
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