Search results for 'Enlightenment Influence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William Farr Church (1974/1973). The Influence of the Enlightenment on the French Revolution. Lexington, Mass.,D. C. Heath.score: 84.0
  2. William Farr Church (1964). The Influence of the Enlightenment on the French Revolution: Creative, Disastrous, or Non-Existent? Boston, Heath.score: 84.0
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  3. Harold Mah (2003). Enlightenment Phantasies: Cultural Identity in France and Germany, 1750-1914. Cornell University Press.score: 84.0
    Introduction: identity as phantasy in Enlightenment in France and Germany -- The man with too many qualities : the young herder between France and Germany -- The language of cultural identity : Diderot to Nietzsche -- Strange classicism : aesthetic vision in Winckelmann, Nietzsche, and Thomas Mann -- Classicism and gender transformation : David, Goethe, and Stal -- The French Revolution and the problem of time : Hegel to Marx.
     
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  4. Lawrence Birken (1995). Hitler as Philosophe: Remnants of the Enlightenment in National Socialism. Praeger.score: 78.0
  5. Thomas Bredsdorff & Anne-Marie Mai (eds.) (2004). Enlightened Networking: Import and Export of Enlightenment in 18th Century Denmark. University Press of Southern Denmark.score: 78.0
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  6. Samar Attar (2007). The Vital Roots of European Enlightenment: Ibn Tufayl's Influence on Modern Western Thought. Lexington Books.score: 72.0
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  7. Lukasz Kurdybacha (1970). The Influence of the Early Enlightenment on John Amos Comenius. Acta Comeniana 1:93-101.score: 72.0
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  8. Diana M. Judd (2008). Questioning Authority: Political Resistance and the Ethic of Natural Science. Transaction Publishers.score: 60.0
    Francis Bacon : a new interpretation of nature -- Thomas Hobbes' scientific approach to politics -- John Locke and the origins of political resistance -- The ethic and practice of modern natural science -- Critical theory and the critique of modernity -- Michel Foucault and the postmodern reaction.
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  9. T. J. Hochstrasser (2000). Natural Law Theories in the Early Enlightenment. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    This major addition to Ideas in Context examines the development of natural law theories in the early stages of the Enlightenment in Germany and France. T. J. Hochstrasser investigates the influence exercised by theories of natural law from Grotius to Kant, with a comparative analysis of the important intellectual innovations in ethics and political philosophy of the time. Hochstrasser includes the writings of Samuel Pufendorf and his followers who evolved a natural law theory based on human sociability and (...)
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  10. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1996). British Philosophy and the Age of Enlightenment. Routledge.score: 54.0
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as the "Enlightenment," a period of empricist reaction to the great seventeeth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment (...)
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  11. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):117-134.score: 42.0
    Contemporary Kant-scholarship has a tendency to allign Kant’s understanding of depravity closer to Erasmus than Luther in their famous debate on the freedom of the will (1520–1527). While, at face value, some paragraphs do warrant such a claim, I will argue that Kant’s understanding of the radical evil will draws closer to Luther than Erasmus in a number of elements. These elements are (1) the intervention of the Wille for progress towards the good, (2) a positive choice for evil, (3) (...)
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  12. Ryu Susato (2007). The Idea of Chivalry in the Scottish Enlightenment. Hume Studies 33 (1):155-178.score: 42.0
    It is generally assumed that in early modern Britain, chivalry—allegedly typified by the Crusades—was considered a negative or even ridiculous ideology until its rehabilitation by the pre-Romantic movement. However, this paper argues that Hume and other Scottish Enlightenment thinkers had already shown a deep interest in its historical role and influence on modern civilization. That Hume shared a broad interest in chivalry with contemporary philosophers does not undermine the novelty of his thought on this topic. In fact, the (...)
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  13. Julia J. A. Shaw (2013). A Study of the Semiotic and Narrative Forms of Divine Influence Within Secular Legal Systems. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (1):95-112.score: 42.0
    Since the Reformation and Enlightenment, the Western world has witnessed the incremental decline of religious influence. Yet, key legal protections and duties incumbent on civilians and state actors in both avowedly secular states and ruling theocracies, predominantly Islamic, are to a lesser or greater extent determined by religious values. Although it is often claimed that the modern secular state encourages the adoption of liberal values and allows for the formulation of general law according to the free will of (...)
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  14. Nathaniel Wolloch (2013). Barbarian Tribes, American Indians and Cultural Transmission: Changing Perspectives From the Enlightenment to Tocqueville. History of Political Thought 34 (3):507-539.score: 42.0
    This article examines the change which occurred in discussions of cultural transmission between the Enlightenment and the liberal outlook of the nineteenth century. The former is exemplified mainly by eighteenth-century historical discussions, the latter by the thought of Alexis de Tocqueville. An interest in the influence of advanced Western cultures on seemingly inferior non-Western societies was consistent throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It was manifested mainly in discussions of the barbarian conquest of the Roman Empire on the (...)
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  15. Stuart Brown (ed.) (1995). Routledge History of Philosophy Volume V: British Empiricism and the Enlightenment. Routledge.score: 42.0
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as `the Enlightenment', the period of empirical reaction to the great seventeenth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure in late chapters, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in (...)
     
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  16. Klaus P. Fischer (1975). John Locke in the German Enlightenment: An Interpretation. Journal of the History of Ideas 36.score: 42.0
    A favorite assumption of anglo-American scholarship is that locke's influence "pervaded the eighteenth century with an almost scriptural authority." examining the philosophy of the german enlightenment, This essay disputes the exaggerated importance ascribed to locke in the eighteenth century. Locke's influence was always limited by native traditions inimical to his thought. His empiricism could not compete with the leibniz-Wolff system in which all german philosophers, Including the lockean sympathizers, Were educated. It is true that around mid-Century and (...)
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  17. G. Garrard (1994). Rousseau, Maistre, and the Counter-Enlightenment. History of Political Thought 15 (1):97-120.score: 42.0
    In this paper, I argue that Rousseau is an important precursor of the Counter-Enlightenment. To this end, I will examine the parallels between his partial critique of the Enlightenment and that of Joseph de Maistre, whose work represents one of the most comprehensive and systematic indictments of the central ideas and objectives of the Enlightenment. Despite his frequent denunciations of Rousseau's ideas and influence, Maistre shares with him a profound concern for what he takes to be (...)
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  18. Stanley Rosen (1995). The Mask of Enlightenment: Nietzsche's Zarathustra. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    The Mask of Enlightenment is the most detailed textual and thematic study of Nietzsche's most important but least understood works: Thus Spake Zarathustra. In this book Nietzsche was laying the groundwork for a fundamental philosophical and political revolution on a global scale. One of the difficulties that the text poses is Nietzsche's prophetic style; Stanley Rosen unweaves the complex threads that form the rhetorical voices of the work, and so explains the style in an accessible manner. He rejects recent (...)
     
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  19. Till Wahnbaeck (2004). Luxury and Public Happiness: Political Economy in the Italian Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    This work charts the development of political economy in eighteenth-century Italy, and it argues that the focus on economic thought is characteristic of the Italian enlightenment at large. Through an analysis of the debate about luxury, it traces the shaping of a new language of political economy which was inspired by, and contributed to, European debate, but which offered solutions that were as much shaped by intellectual traditions and socio-economic circumstances as by French or Scottish precedent. Ultimately, those traditions (...)
     
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  20. Sébastian Charles (2004). Berkeley no país das Luzes: ceticismo e solipsismo no século XVIII. Doispontos 1 (2).score: 36.0
    A influência do ceticismo nos século XVI e XVII é por demais evidente para ser posta em questão. De Montaigne a Bayle, parece que o cético foi o promotor tanto de uma refutação radical dos princípios metafísicos escolásticos e depois cartesianos quanto de uma crítica feroz às autoridades religiosas e políticas. Ora, esse papel parece ter se amenizado no Século das Luzes, ou melhor, se deslocado - somente as dimensões críticas do social continuaram pertinentes. Pretende-se mostrar aqui o pressuposto de (...)
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  21. Nancy Yousef (2004). Isolated Cases: The Anxieties of Autonomy in Enlightenment Philosophy and Romantic Literature. Cornell University Press.score: 32.0
    While individuals presented in central texts of the period are indeed often alone or separated from others, Yousef regards this isolation as a problem the texts attempt to illuminate, rather than a condition they construct as normative or ...
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  22. Michael L. Frazer (2007). John Rawls: Between Two Enlightenments. Political Theory 35 (6):756 - 780.score: 30.0
    John Rawls shares the Enlightenment's commitment to finding moral and political principles which can be reflectively endorsed by all individuals autonomously. He usually presents reflective autonomy in Kantian, rationalist terms: autonomy is identified with the exercise of reason, and principles of justice must be constructed which are acceptable to all on the basis of reason alone. Yet David Hume, Adam Smith and many other Enlightenment thinkers rejected such rationalism, searching instead for principles which can be endorsed by all (...)
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  23. Jay Garfield (1995). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    For nearly two thousand years Buddhism has mystified and captivated both lay people and scholars alike. Seen alternately as a path to spiritual enlightenment, an system of ethical and moral rubrics, a cultural tradition, or simply a graceful philosophy of life, Buddhism has produced impassioned followers the world over. The Buddhist saint Nagarjuna, who lived in South India in approximately the first century CE, is undoubtedly the most important, influential, and widely studied Mahayana Buddhist philosopher. His many works include (...)
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  24. Seamus Grimes & Jaime Nubiola (1997). Reconsidering the Exclusion of Metaphysics in Human Geography. Acta Philosophica 6 (2):265-276.score: 24.0
    From the time of Descartes a strong tendency emerged to exclude the consideration of metaphysical questions as a necessary step towards developing truly scientific disciplines. Within human geography, positivism had a significant influence in moulding the discipline as "spatial science", resulting in a reductionist vision of humanity. Since the 1970s, in reaction to the limitations of this narrow vision and also to the deterministic perspective of marxism, humanistic approaches became important, but have failed to adequately deal with the exclusion (...)
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  25. Anne Finch Conway (1996). The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Anne Conway was an extraordinary figure in a remarkable age. Her mastery of the intricate doctrines of the Lurianic Kabbalah, her authorship of a treatise criticising the philosophy of Descartes, Hobbes, and Spinoza, and her scandalous conversion to the despised sect of Quakers indicate a strength of character and independence of mind wholly unexpected (and unwanted) in a woman at the time. Translated for the first time into modern English, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy is the (...)
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  26. Adrian Kuzminski (2007). Pyrrhonism and the Mādhyamaka. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):482-511.score: 24.0
    : The question of possible Indian influence on Pyrrhonist skepticism was raised long ago by Diogenes Laertius in his biography of Pyrrho. Diogenes tells us that Pyrrho adopted his "most noble philosophy" as a result of his contacts with Indian sages when he accompanied Alexander the Great on his expedition in the fourth century B.C.E. Most modern Western scholars have downplayed Diogenes’ claim as unsubstantiated, but the striking parallels to be found in subsequent ancient Pyrrhonist and Mādhyamaka texts suggest (...)
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  27. Nidhal Guessoum (2008). The Qur'an, Science, and the (Related) Contemporary Muslim Discourse. Zygon 43 (2):411-431.score: 24.0
    We discuss the special place of the Qur'an in the Muslim discourse in general and on science in particular. The Qur'an has an unparalleled influence on the Muslim mind, and understanding the Islamic treatise on science and religion must start from this realization. We explore the concept of science in the Islamic culture and to what extent it can be related to the Qur'an. Reviewing various Islamic discourses on science, we show how a simplistic understanding of the plan to (...)
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  28. Margaret J. Osler (ed.) (1991). Atoms, Pneuma, and Tranquillity: Epicurean and Stoic Themes in European Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume examines the influence that Epicureanism and Stoicism, two philosophies of nature and human nature articulated during classical times, exerted on the development of European thought to the Enlightenment. Although the influence of these philosophies has often been noted in certain areas, such as the influence of Stoicism on the development of Christian thought and the influence of Epicureanism on modern materialism, the chapters in this volume forward a new awareness of the degree to (...)
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  29. Alexander Naraniecki (2010). Neo-Positivist or Neo-Kantian? Karl Popper and the Vienna Circle. Philosophy 85 (4):511-530.score: 24.0
    This paper re-contextualises Popper within a Kantian tradition by examining his interaction with the Vienna Circle. The complexity of Popper's relationship to the Vienna Circle is often a point of confusion as some view him as a member of the Vienna Circle while others minimise his association with this group. This paper argues that Popper was not a member of the Vienna Circle or a positivist but shared many neo-Kantian philosophical tendencies with the members of the Circle as well as (...)
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  30. Paul Guyer (2006). Kant. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) is arguably the most influential of the Enlightenment Philosophers. In this outstanding introduction, Paul Guyer introduces and assesses all the major aspects of Kant's thought. Beginning with a helpful overview of Kant's life and times, Guyer introduces the "Copernican revolution" Kant brought about in metaphysics and epistemology, carefully introducing his arguments about the nature of experience, space and time in his most influential but difficult work, The Critique of Pure Reason. He gives a much-needed explanation of (...)
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  31. Thomas L. Pangle (2010). The Theological Basis of Liberal Modernity in Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws. The University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    The Spirit of the Laws —Montesquieu’s huge, complex, and enormously influential work—is considered one of the central texts of the Enlightenment, laying the foundation for the liberally democratic political regimes that were to embody its values. In his penetrating analysis, Thomas L. Pangle brilliantly argues that the inherently theological project of Enlightenment liberalism is made more clearly—and more consequentially— in Spirit than in any other work. _ In a probing and careful reading, Pangle shows how Montesquieu believed that (...)
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  32. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The two great philosophical figures at the culminating point of the Enlightenment are Thomas Reid in Scotland and Immanuel Kant in Germany. Reid was by far the most influential across Europe and the United States well into the nineteenth century. Since that time his fame and influence have been eclipsed by his German contemporary. This important book by one of today's leading philosophers of knowledge and religion will do much to reestablish the significance of Reid for philosophy today. (...)
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  33. Neil Burtonwood (2006). Cultural Diversity, Liberal Pluralism and Schools: Isaiah Berlin and Education. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Culturally diverse liberal democracies on both sides of the Atlantic are currently faced with serious questions about the education of their future citizens. What is the balance between the need for social cohesion, and at the same time dealing justly with the demands for exemptions and accommodations from cultural and religious minorities? In contemporary Britain, the importance of this question has been recently highlighted by the concern to develop political and educational strategies capable of countering the influence of extremist (...)
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  34. Timothy Clark (2002). Martin Heidegger. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The influence of Heidegger's on current thought has been pervasive. In reaction to Enlightenment ideas, he presents a view of the modern world as destructive of nature, community, tradition, individuality, and more. His writings have influenced such central social and literary thinkers as Derrida and Foucault. This volume is the first thorough introduction to his work on language and literature. Heidegger's reputation for being difficult has scared off many who would have otherwise profited from a knowledge of his (...)
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  35. Arsenio Ginzo Fernández (2012). Eduard Gans y la idea de Europa. Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de la Ideas 6 (6):57-86.score: 24.0
    This article is supposed to be an approximation to Eduard Gans´ conception of Europe, an author considered to be the most prominent disciple of Hegel by a growing number of scholars. In those times, the idea of Europe was a highly topical subject, due to both to the influence of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, but as well to the development of German idealism. Gans is closely related to these instances and formulates an idea of Europe that (...)
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  36. Benjamin R. Tucker, State Socialism and Anarchism: How Far They Agree, and Wherein They Differ (1888).score: 24.0
    recruits or the area of its influence, which has been attained by Modern Socialism, and at the same time been so little understood and so misunderstood, not only by the hostile and the indifferent, but by the friendly, and even by the great mass of its adherents themselves. This unfortunate and highly dangerous state of things is due partly to the fact that the human relationships which this movement – if anything so chaotic can be called a movement – (...)
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  37. W. M. Spellman (1997). John Locke. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    The influence of John Locke's thought in Europe and America rests largely on his articulation and defence of a liberal political philosophy, and in his formulation of a theory of knowledge where experience and environment provide the exclusive starting points in the educational process. Generally he continues to be associated with the eighteenth-century 'Age of Reason' or Enlightenment, where the malleability of human nature, together with the inherent dignity and freedom of the individual, were placed at the forefront (...)
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  38. Marcelo Dascal, Reframing the Historiography of Philosophy: A Dialectic Approach.score: 24.0
    Kant considered it a scandal that philosophy, unlike science, had been spending its time in fruitless debates, which hindered its progress. In this session, we question Kant’s assessment, and suggest an approach to the history of philosophy that considers controversy as essential in the evolution of philosophical ideas. In his recent work on the Enlightenment, Jonathan Israel has demonstrated the role of the intense debate around radically new philosophical ideas in creating the conceptual underpinnings of revolution and of a (...)
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  39. Phyllis Vandenberg & Abigail DeHart, Mandeville, Bernard. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) Bernard Mandeville is primarily remembered for his impact on discussions of morality and economic theory in the early eighteenth century. His most noteworthy and notorious work is The Fable of the Bees, which triggered immense public criticism at the time. He had a particular influence on philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, most […].
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  40. Andy Miah, The Olympic Games and the Cyborg- Athlete: Any Room for Improvement?score: 24.0
    This paper is prompted by the radical emergence of technology that exists in contemporary sport and culture. Of particular interest are the technologies that threaten to alter an already changing concept of the human condition, such as genetic engineering and prosthetics. However, it is fundamental to consider the more subtle technologies, which influence change in sports, such as the equipment used by an athlete and the methods of training that are unmistakably technological. Such subtle technologies, I argue, can provoke (...)
     
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  41. Iep Author, Mandeville, Bernard. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) Bernard Mandeville is primarily remembered for his impact on discussions of morality and economic theory in the early eighteenth century. His most noteworthy and notorious work is The Fable of the Bees, which triggered immense public criticism at the time. He had a particular influence on philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, most […].
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  42. C. D. Coe (2009). Strangers and Natives: Gadamer, Colonial Discourse and the Politics of Understanding. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (8):921-933.score: 24.0
    I claim that the hermeneutic circle both describes and undermines the colonialist impulse, by mapping how our prejudices are projected out into reality but thus make themselves vulnerable to critical scrutiny. Gadamer’s attention to the way in which our prejudices should be challenged, his emphasis on the construction of the tradition that has such an influence on our understanding (and our tendency to ignore that malleability), and his resistance to the Enlightenment ideal of transcending the historical and natural (...)
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  43. Alessandro Mulieri (2012). Liberalism Against Democracy: A Comparative Analysis of the Concepts of Totalitarian Democracy and Positive Liberty in Jacob Leib Talmon and Isaiah Berlin. History of European Ideas 39 (3):449-466.score: 24.0
    Summary This article presents a comparative analysis of the concepts of totalitarian democracy and positive liberty in the work of Jacob Leib Talmon and Isaiah Berlin. Its main purpose is to show that a combined analysis of Talmon and Berlin's biographical relationship and their individual texts demonstrates that Talmon's idea of totalitarian democracy may have had a greater influence on Berlin's notion of positive liberty than Berlin seems to have ever acknowledged. The article first summarises the intellectual and biographical (...)
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  44. Arpad Szakolczai (2007). Image-Magic in A Midsummer Night's Dream: Power and Modernity From Weber to Shakespeare. History of the Human Sciences 20 (4):1-26.score: 24.0
    This article argues that the modern world is not only produced by, and is promoting, processes of rationalization and disenchantment, but is also the site of `enchanting' influences that are genuinely `charming' or `magical'. Such modes of influencing rely increasingly on the power of images, and on theatre-like performances of words or discourses. The impact takes place under conditions that, following Victor Turner's work, could be called `liminal', and which can be turned through `imagemagic' into a state of `permanent liminality'. (...)
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  45. Richard Acworth (forthcoming). Malebranche and His Heirs. Journal of the History of Ideas.score: 24.0
    F alquie has shown that, contrary to malebranche's own intention, his main influence in france was in the direction of deism. yet in england malebranche appealed to devout christians and greatly influenced the platonist john norris. why was his influence so different in the two countries? mainly, the author suggests, because norris was attracted by malebranche's central thesis of man's direct vision of the divine ideas, whereas the french enlightenment was influenced by theses which were less central (...)
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  46. Christopher J. Berry, Maria Pia Paganelli & Craig Smith (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Preface Introduction Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith: Outline of Life, Times, and Legacy Part One: Adam Smith: Heritage and Contemporaries 1: Nicholas Phillipson: Adam Smith: A Biographer's Reflections 2: Leonidas Montes: Newtonianism and Adam Smith 3: Dennis C. Rasmussen: Adam Smith and Rousseau: Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment 4: Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith and Early Modern Thought Part Two: Adam Smith on Language, Art and Culture 5: Catherine Labio: Adam Smith's Aesthetics 6: James Chandler: Adam Smith as Critic 7: (...)
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  47. Dale Cannon (2008). “Polanyi's Influence on Poteat's Conceptualization of Modernity's 'Insanity' and Its Cure. Tradition and Discovery 35 (2):23-30.score: 24.0
    My intent is to paint in rather broad strokes Bill Poteat’s intellectual agenda, as I came to understand it, and how Michael Polanyi fit into that agenda for Poteat alongside other major intellectual mentors. Bill’s agenda was to expose critically and, so far as possible, to counter the fateful consequences of what he called the “prepossessions of the European Enlightenment” regarding human knowing, human doing, and human being. Although his work involved conceptual analysis, the nature of this conceptual-archaeology was (...)
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  48. Robert A. Ferguson (2004). The Dialectic of Liberty: Law and Religion in Anglo-American Culture. Modern Intellectual History 1 (1):27-54.score: 24.0
    The separation of church and state disguised the coordination of two very different conceptions of liberty at work in Revolutionary America, one with a religious basis in radical Protestant thought and the other with a legal basis in the secular Enlightenment. The essay combines the disciplines of law, literature, and intellectual history to investigate these contrasting formulations and their changing relationship. Cross-cultural analysis of the language of protest in both England and America gives the investigation a crucial focus. It (...)
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  49. Henrik Lübker (2012). The Method of In-Between in the Grotesque and the Works of Leif Lage. Continent 2 (3):170-181.score: 24.0
    “Artworks are not being but a process of becoming” —Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory In the everyday use of the concept, saying that something is grotesque rarely implies anything other than saying that something is a bit outside of the normal structure of language or meaning – that something is a peculiarity. But in its historical use the concept has often had more far reaching connotations. In different phases of history the grotesque has manifested its forms as a means of (...)
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  50. Florin Lobont (2010). Romanian Orthodoxy, Between Ideology of Exclusion and Secularisation Amiable. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (24):46-69.score: 24.0
    The present study represents a preliminary theoretical attempt to analyse the socio-political influence and impact of the Romanian Orthodoxy within the Romanian public life and political culture since 1990, both through the relation between the Orthodox Church and the state, and its impact on the wider society. An open-ended reflection on a constantly unfolding reality, the approach focuses on demonstrating the profound “modernity”—not backwardness—of Orthodoxy’s implicit political theology and derived ideologies and their “modern” destructiveness. The pivotal segment of the (...)
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