Search results for 'Environmental Justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philemon Oyewole (2001). Social Costs of Environmental Justice Associated with the Practice of Green Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):239 - 251.score: 240.0
    This paper presents a conceptual link among green marketing, environmental justice, and industrial ecology. It argues for greater awareness of environmental justice in the practice of green marketing. In contrast with the type of costs commonly discussed in the literature, the paper identified another type of costs, termed "costs with positive results," that may be associated with the presence of environmental justice in green marketing. A research agenda is finally suggested to determine consumers'' awareness (...)
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  2. James Dwyer (2009). How to Connect Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: Health, Sustainability, and Justice. Bioethics 23 (9):497-502.score: 192.0
    In this paper, I explore one way to bring bioethics and environmental ethics closer together. I focus on a question at the interface of health, sustainability, and justice: How well does a society promote health with the use of no more than a just share of environmental capacity? To address this question, I propose and discuss a mode of assessment that combines a measurement of population health, an estimate of environmental sustainability, and an assumption about what (...)
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  3. Derek Bell (2004). Environmental Justice and Rawls' Difference Principle. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):287-306.score: 186.0
    It is widely acknowledged that low-income and minority communities in liberal democratic societies suffer a disproportionate burden of environmental hazards. Is “environmental injustice” a necessary feature of liberal societies or is its prevalence due to the failure of existing liberal democracies to live up to liberal principles of justice? One leading version of liberalism, John Rawls’ “justice as fairness,” can be “extended” to accommodate the concerns expressed by advocates of environmental justice. Moreover, Rawlsian (...) justice has some significant advantages over existing conceptions of environmental justice. (shrink)
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  4. Daniel C. Wigley & Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1996). Environmental Justice: A Louisiana Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (1):61-82.score: 186.0
    The paper begins with a brief analysis of the concepts of environmental justice and environmental racism and classism. The authors argue that pollution- and environment-related decision-making is prima facie wrong whenever it results in inequitable treatment of individuals on the basis of race or socio-economic status. The essay next surveys the history of the doctrine of free informed consent and argues that the consent of those affected is necessary for ensuring the fairness of decision-making for siting hazardous (...)
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  5. Troy W. Hartley (1995). Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil Rights Value Acceptable to All World Views. Environmental Ethics 17 (3):277-289.score: 186.0
    In accordance with environmental injustice, sometimes called environmental racism, minority communities are disproportionately subjected to a higher level of environmental risk than other segments of society. Growing concern over unequal environmental risk and mounting evidence of both racial and economic injustices have led to a grass-roots civil rights campaign called the environmental justice movement. The environmental ethics aspects of environmental injustice challenge narrow utilitarian views and promote Kantian rights and obligations. Nevertheless, an (...)
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  6. Roy W. Perrett (1998). Indigenous Rights and Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):377-391.score: 186.0
    The modern environmental movement has a tradition of respect for indigenous cultures and many environmentalists believe that there are important ecological lessons to be learned from studying the traditional life styles of indigenous peoples. More recently, however, some environmentalists have become more sceptical. This scepticism has been sharpened by current concerns with the cause of indigenous rights. Indigenous peoples have repeatedly insisted on their rights to pursue traditional practices or to develop their lands, even when the exercise of these (...)
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  7. Karen J. Warren (1999). Environmental Justice: Some Ecofeminist Worries About a Distributive Model. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):151-161.score: 186.0
    I argue that the framing of environmental justice issues in terms of distribution is problematic. Using insights about the connections between institutions of human oppression and the domination of the natural environment, as well as insights into nondistributive justice, I argue for a nondistributive model to supplement, complement, and in some cases preempt the distributive model. I conclude with a discussion of eight features of such a nondistributive conception of justice.
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  8. Keith Bosak (2010). Ecotourism as Environmental Justice? Discourse and the Politics of Scale in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):49-74.score: 186.0
    This paper uses the case of the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve to illustrate how ecotourism can be a vehicle for environmental justice. I use discourse analysis and the politics of scale to argue that an expanded notion of environmental justice does account for the myriad movements for resource rights occurring all over the world. In this case, framing the struggle through ecotourism with a focus on social justice provided local people a way to engage the (...)
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  9. Joshua Mousie (2012). Global Environmental Justice and Postcolonial Critique. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):21-45.score: 186.0
    In this article I examine contemporary accounts of global justice theory (which I designate as domestic and institutional) and how they are implemented in order to formulate notions of global environmental justice. I underscore how these accounts are limited in their ability to provide thick conceptions of environmental justice, mainly because they fail to provide promising alternative visions of global politics that can substantially combat the injustices and inequalities that are currently so popular in neoliberal (...)
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  10. Paul Haught (2011). Environmental Virtues and Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 33 (4):357-375.score: 186.0
    Environmental virtue ethics (EVE) can be applied to environmental justice. Environmental justice refers to the concern that many poor and nonwhite communities bear a disproportionate burden of risk of exposure to environmental hazards compared to white and/or economically higher-class communities. The most common applied ethical response to this concern—that is, to environmental injustice—is the call for an expanded application of human rights, such as requirements for clean air and water. The virtue-oriented approach can (...)
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  11. Kristen Hessler (2011). Agricultural Biotechnology and Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 33 (3):267-282.score: 186.0
    Agricultural biotechnology has long been criticized from an environmental justice perspective. However, an analysis, using golden rice as a case study, shows that golden rice is not susceptible to the main criticisms that are appropriate when directed at most products of agricultural biotechnology, and that golden rice has important humanitarian potential. For these reasons, an environmental justice evaluation of golden rice may need to be more nuanced and complex than a more traditional environmental ethics can (...)
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  12. Ralph M. Perhac Jr (1999). Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):81-92.score: 186.0
    It is widely held that environmental risks which are distributed unequally along racial or socioeconomic lines are necessarily distributed unjustly. While disproportionality may result from the perpetration of procedural injustices—what might be termed environmental racism, the question I am concerned with is whether disproportionality, in and of itself, constitutes injustice. I examine this question from the perspective of three prominent theories of justice that largely capture the range of our intuitions about fairness and justice—utilitarianism, natural rights (...)
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  13. Steve Vanderheiden & Melanie Sisson (2010). Ethically Responsible Leisure? Promoting Social and Environmental Justice Through Ecotourism. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):33-47.score: 186.0
    Ecotourism has been lauded as a potentially effective means for raising revenue for nature conservation, and certification schemes likewise promise to help to “sustain the well-being of local people” in ecotourist destinations. In this paper, we consider the social and environmental justice dimensions of ecotourism through the certification schemes that define the industry, treating the desire to engage in ethically responsible travel as a necessary but insufficient condition for bringing about these desired ends, and one that requires accurate (...)
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  14. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. OUP USA.score: 180.0
    Shrader-Frechette offers a rigorous philosophical discussion of environmental justice. Explaining fundamental ethical concepts such as equality, property rights, procedural justice, free informed consent, intergenerational equity, and just compensation--and then bringing them to bear on real-world social issues--she shows how many of these core concepts have been compromised for a large segment of the global population, among them Appalachians, African-Americans, workers in hazardous jobs, and indigenous people in developing nations. She argues that burdens like pollution and resource depletion (...)
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  15. David Schlosberg (2007). Defining Environmental Justice: Theories, Movements, and Nature. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    The basic task of this book is to explore what, exactly, is meant by 'justice' in definitions of environmental and ecological justice. It examines how the term is used in both self-described environmental justice movements and in theories of environmental and ecological justice. The central argument is that a theory and practice of environmental justice necessarily includes distributive conceptions of justice, but must also embrace notions of justice based in (...)
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  16. Edward Abplanalp, Background Environmental Justice: An Extension of Rawls's Political Liberalism.score: 180.0
    This dissertation extends John Rawls’s mature theory of justice out to address the environmental challenges that citizens of liberal democracies now face. Specifically, using Rawls’s framework of political liberalism, I piece together a theory of procedural justice to be applied to a constitutional democracy. I show how citizens of pluralistic democracies should apply this theory to environmental matters in a four stage contracting procedure. I argue that, if implemented, this extension to Rawls’s theory would secure background (...)
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  17. Mick Hillman (2004). The Importance of Environmental Justice in Stream Rehabilitation. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):19 – 43.score: 180.0
    New forms of river management have emerged following widespread recognition of the environmental damage caused by attempts to harness and control rivers for navigation, consumptive water use and power generation. A dominant top-down engineering-based paradigm is being challenged by catchment-framed, ecosystem-based approaches which claim to place greater emphasis on participation and equity. However, there has been limited attention given to examining these claims, and principles of justice are frequently left unarticulated or embedded in what is still presented as (...)
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  18. Robert Melchior Figueroa & Gordon Waitt (2008). Cracks in the Mirror: (Un)Covering the Moral Terrains of Environmental Justice at Ulu R U-Kata Tju T a National Park. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):327 – 349.score: 180.0
    The authors' aim is to provide a more complete picture of a non-anthropocentric relational ethics by addressing the failure to account for environmental justice. They argue that environmental ethics is always more than how discourses are layered over place, by situating moral agency through the body's affective repertoire of being-in-the-world. Empirical evidence for their argument is drawn from self-reflexive accounts of young Americans travelling to Ulu r u-Kata Tju t a National Park, Northern Territory, Australia as part (...)
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  19. Kristie Dotson & Kyle Whyte (2013). Environmental Justice, Unknowability and Unqualified Affectability. Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):55-79.score: 180.0
    Environmental justice seeks fairness in how environmental burdens and risks are visited on poor people, women, communities of color, Indigenous peoples, minorities, and citizens of developing countries. It also concerns whether members of these same groups have fair access to environmental goods such as urban green spaces, forested areas, and clean water. Environmental goods extend, also, to opportunities to benefit from enterprises such as tourism and green infrastructure (Shrader-Frechette 2002; Bullard 2000; Taylor 2000; Whyte 2010). (...)
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  20. Daniel Kruidenier & Scott Morrison (2013). Avoid the Banking Model in Social and Environmental Justice Education: Interrogate the Tensions. Educational Studies 49 (5):430-442.score: 180.0
    In this article, we argue that when teaching about and for social and environmental justice, teachers need to move beyond promoting individual behavior changes as a primary means to counter complex, global problems. Further, we advocate for a more robust strategy for teaching about and for social and environmental justice that not only raises awareness about oppression, inequality, and destruction, but also, and more importantly, interrogates how we define and operationalize the concept of justice. This, (...)
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  21. Gordon Waitt & Robert Melchior Figueroa (2008). Cracks in the Mirror: (Un)Covering the Moral Terrains of Environmental Justice at Ulu R U-Kata Tju T a National Park. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):327-349.score: 180.0
    The authors' aim is to provide a more complete picture of a non-anthropocentric relational ethics by addressing the failure to account for environmental justice. They argue that environmental ethics is always more than how discourses are layered over place, by situating moral agency through the body's affective repertoire of being-in-the-world. Empirical evidence for their argument is drawn from self-reflexive accounts of young Americans travelling to Ulu r u-Kata Tju t a National Park, Northern Territory, Australia as part (...)
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  22. Robert Gottlieb & Andrew Fisher (1996). Community Food Security and Environmental Justice: Searching for a Common Discourse. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):23-32.score: 180.0
    Community food security and environmental justice are parallel social movements interested in equity and justice and system-wide factors. They share a concern for issues of daily life and the need to establish community empowerment strategies. Both movements have also begun to reshape the discourse of sustainable agriculture, environmentalism and social welfare advocacy. However, community food security and environmental justice remain separate movements, indicating an incomplete process in reshaping agendas and discourse. Joining these movements through a (...)
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  23. Peter S. Wenz (2000). Environmental Justice Through Improved Efficiency. Environmental Values 9 (2):173 - 188.score: 162.0
    Environmentalists can convince others to adopt nature-friendly policies through appeal to commonly-held values. Efficiency and justice are such values in industrial societies, but these values are often considered at odds with each other and with policies that preserve land and reduce pollution. The present paper analyses the notion of efficiency and argues that transportation policies that environmentalists favour – substitution of intercity rail and urban mass transit for most automotive forms of transport – are both efficient and just.
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  24. M. Weld (2012). Deconstructing the Dangerous Dogma of Denial: The Feminist-Environmental Justice Movement and its Flight From Overpopulation. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 12 (1):53-58.score: 156.0
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  25. Allen Habib (2013). Sharing the Earth: Sustainability and the Currency of Inter-Generational Environmental Justice. Environmental Values 22 (6):751-764.score: 156.0
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  26. Robert Kirkman (2001). Environmental Justice and the New Pluralism: The Challenge of Difference for Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):109-110.score: 156.0
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  27. Eric Katz (1989). Peter Wenz: Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 11 (3):269-275.score: 156.0
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  28. Costas Panayotakis (2009). Defining Environmental Justice. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):317-319.score: 156.0
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  29. Robert Kirkman (2001). Environmental Justice and the New Pluralism. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):109-110.score: 156.0
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  30. James P. Sterba (1994). Environmental Justice: Reconciling Anthropocentric and Nonanthropocentric Ethics. Environmental Values 3 (3):229-244.score: 156.0
     
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  31. Peter F. Cannavó (2008). Defining Environmental Justice: Theories, Movements, and Nature - by David Schlosberg. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (3):336-338.score: 150.0
  32. Greta Gaard (2010). Reproductive Technology, or Reproductive Justice?: An Ecofeminist, Environmental Justice Perspective on the Rhetoric of Choice. Ethics and the Environment 15 (2):103-129.score: 150.0
    When I opened the Minneapolis StarTribune one Sunday morning, hoping for thirty (or even ten) minutes of quiet reading before my toddler woke up, the headline “Miracles for Sale” caught my eye (2007). Introduced by a photo of a mother and baby, and followed by the story of that same happy “older” (age 36) mother who now has two children by egg donation, the article profiled a 24-year-old artist and antique dealer who feels “one of her eggs goes to waste (...)
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  33. Brent A. Singer (1988). An Extension of Rawls' Theory of Justice to Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 10 (3):217-231.score: 150.0
    By combining and augmenting recent arguments that have appeared in the literature, I show how a modified Rawlsian theory of justice generates a strong environmental and animal rights ethic. These modifications include significant changes in the conditions of the contract situation vis-a-vis A Theory of Justice, but I argue that these modifications are in fact more consistent with Rawls’ basic assumptions about the functions of a veil of ignorance and a thin theory of the good.
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  34. Avner de-Shalit (2004). Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy (Review). Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):140-144.score: 150.0
  35. Daniel Steel & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Environmental Justice, Values, and Scientific Expertise. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):163-182.score: 150.0
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  36. Janet S. Adams, Armen Tashchian & Ted H. Shore (2001). Social Costs of Environmental Justice Associated with the Practice of Green Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):199-211.score: 150.0
    This study investigated effects of codes of ethics on perceptions of ethical behavior. Respondents from companies with codes of ethics (n = 465) rated role set members (top management, supervisors, peers, subordinates, self) as more ethical and felt more encouraged and supported for ethical behavior than respondents from companies without codes (n = 301). Key aspects of the organizational climate, such as supportiveness for ethical behavior, freedom to act ethically, and satisfaction with the outcome of ethical problems were impacted by (...)
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  37. Russ Manning (1981). Environmental Ethics and Rawls' Theory of Justice. Environmental Ethics 3 (2):155-165.score: 150.0
    Although John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice does not deal specifically with the ethics of environmental concerns, it can generally be applied to give justification for the prudent and continent use of our natural resources. The argument takes two forms: one dealing with the immediate effects of environmental impact and the other, delayed effects. Immediate effects, which impact the present society, should besubject to environmental controls because they affect health and opportunity, social primary goods to be (...)
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  38. Larry O. Gostin (2007). Global Climate Change: The Roberts Court and Environmental Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):10-11.score: 150.0
  39. Katie McShane (2003). Review of Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (9).score: 150.0
  40. Avner de-Shalit (2004). Book Review: Kristin Shrader-Frechette. Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):140-144.score: 150.0
  41. Dorceta E. Taylor (1997). Women of Color, Environmental Justice, and Ecofeminism. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 38--81.score: 150.0
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  42. J. Baird Callicott (1989). Book Review:Environmental Justice. Peter S. Wenz. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):197-.score: 150.0
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  43. C. A. Bowers (2003). The Case Against John Dewey as an Environmental and Eco-Justice Philosopher. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):25-42.score: 150.0
    Environmentally oriented philosophers and educational theorists are now attempting to clarify how the ideas of John Dewey can be used as the basis for changing cultural practices that contribute to the ecological crisis. Although Dewey can be interpreted as a nonanthropocentric thinker and his method of experimental inquiry can be used in eco-management projects, Dewey should not be regarded as an environmental and eco-justice philosopher—and by extension, his followers should not be regarded in this light. (1) Dewey’s emphasis (...)
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  44. Juliana Maantay (2002). Zoning Law, Health, and Environmental Justice: What's the Connection? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):572-593.score: 150.0
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  45. Richard P. Hiskes (2006). Environmental Human Rights and Intergenerational Justice. Human Rights Review 7 (3):81-95.score: 150.0
    What do the living owe those who come after them? It is a question nonsensical to some and unanswerable to others, yet tantalizing in its persistence especially among environmentalists. This article makes a new start on the topic of intergenerational justice by bringing together human rights and environmental justice arguments in a novel way that lays the groundwork for a theory of intergenerational environmental justice based in the human rights to clean air, water, and soil. (...)
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  46. Stephen Healy (2005). STS and Environmental Justice: An Uneasy Alchemy? [REVIEW] Metascience 14 (2):195-199.score: 150.0
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  47. Former Welfare Mother (2003). Adamson, Joni, Evans, Mei Mei and Stein, Rachel (Eds)(2002) The Environmental Justice Reader: The Politics and Poetics of Pedagogy, Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. Bailey, Britt and Lappe, Marc (Eds)(2002) Engineering the Farm: Ethical and Social Aspects of Agricultural Biotechnology, Washington, DC: Island Press. [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (1):93.score: 150.0
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  48. Omoyemen Odigie-Emmanuel (2010). Women and the Environmental Justice Movement in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. In Irene Dankelman (ed.), Gender and Climate Change: An Introduction. Earthscan. 247.score: 150.0
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