Search results for 'Environmental degradation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Richard J. Chacon & Ruben G. Mendoza (eds.) (2012). The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare. Springer.
    This work documents the ethical dilemmas faced by anthropologists and researchers in general when investigating Amerindian communities.
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  2.  9
    William I. Woods (2004). Population Nucleation, Intensive Agriculture, and Environmental Degradation: The Cahokia Example. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 21 (2-3):255-261.
    Cahokia, the largest pre-European settlement in North America, was situated on the Middle Mississippi River floodplain and flourished for approximately three hundred years from the 10th century AD onward. The site was favorably located from an environmental standpoint, being proximal to a diversity of microhabitats including expanses of open water and marshes from which the essential, renewable fish protein could be procured. More importantly, the largest local zone of soils characterized as optimal for prehistoric hoe cultivation lay immediately to (...)
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  3.  25
    Ron Wagler (2009). Foucault, the Consumer Culture and Environmental Degradation. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (3):331-336.
    Michel Foucault's theories and their relevance to 'consumer culture' and environmental degradation are considered. Specifically, Foucault's theory of power/knowledge and biopower are considered in light of current consumption rates among global consumer cultures and their link to trends in global environmental degradation. Lastly, Foucault's theory of resistance is suggested as a mechanism for environmental sustainability.
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  4.  10
    Leo Marx (1992). Environmental Degradation and the Ambiguous Social Role of Science and Technology. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):449 - 468.
    Recent anxieties about the deterioration of the global environment have had the effect of intensifying the ambiguity that surrounds the social roles of scientists and engineers. This has happened not merely, as suggested at the outset, because the environmental crisis has made their roles more conspicuous. Nor is it merely because recent disasters have alerted us to new, or hitherto unrecognized, social consequences of using the latest science-based technologies. What also requires recognition is that ideas about the social role (...)
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  5.  1
    Matthew T. Eggemeier (2013). A Sacramental Vision: Environmental Degradation and the Aesthetics of Creation. Modern Theology 29 (3):338-360.
    This article contends that Hans Urs von Balthasar's theological focus on seeing the form of God's glory in creation constitutes a critical resource for elaborating a contemporary Christian theology responsive to the crisis of environmental degradation. In particular, in this article Martin Heidegger's reflections on the environmental dangers present in modern technology provide the framework for analyzing the ecological significance of Balthasar's retrieval of a Christian sacramental ontology.
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  6. John Cairns Jr (2003). Reparations for Environmental Degradation and Species Extinction: A Moral and Ethical Imperative for Human Society. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 3:25-32.
     
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  7. B. K. Marshall (1999). Globalisation, Environmental Degradation and Ulrich Beck's Risk Society. Environmental Values 8 (2):253-275.
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  8. Simon Caney (2006). Environmental Degradation, Reparations, and the Moral Significance of History. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):464–482.
  9.  2
    Brent K. Marshall (1999). Globalisation, Environmental Degradation and Ulrich Beck's Risk Society. Environmental Values 8 (2):253-275.
    This paper is organised in three interconnected parts. First, contemporary political economic approaches to understanding the structure of the global economic system are outlined and synthesised. Specifically, it is suggested that the current structural configuration of the globe is a transitional phase between the spatially-bounded configuration hypothesised by world-system theory and the configuration hypothesised by globalisation theorists. Second, the contemporary problem of environmental degradation is situated in a global structural context. Third, an outline and critique of Ulrich Beck (...)
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  10.  11
    Arpana Dhar (2003). Ethical Responsibility Towards Environmental Degradation. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (4).
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  11.  14
    Aristotelis Santas (1999). Subject/Object Dualism and Environmental Degradation. Philosophical Inquiry 21 (3-4):79-96.
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  12.  2
    Callan Davies (2015). Environmental Degradation in Jacobean Drama. The European Legacy 21 (1):88-90.
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  13.  14
    Robert Elliot (1989). Environmental Degradation, Vandalism and the Aesthetic Object Argument. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (2):191 – 204.
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  14.  4
    R. Matiki (2011). Government Sponsored "Slash" and "Burn" Cultivation as a Force Behind the Intensification of Environmental Degradation and Poverty at Akamkpa- Cross River State. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1).
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  15. William Coleman (1976). Providence, Capitalism, and Environmental Degradation: English Apologetics in an Era of Economic Revolution. Journal of the History of Ideas 37 (1):27.
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  16. M. T. Donohoe (2008). Roles and Responsibilities of Health Professionals in Confronting the Health Consequences of Environmental Degradation and Social Injustice: Education and Activism. Monash Bioethics Review 27:65-82.
     
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  17. Leo Marx (1992). Environmental Degradation and the Ambiguous Social Role of Science and Technology. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):449-468.
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  18. R. K. Singh Raman, Rajeev K. Gupta & Carl C. Koch (2010). Resistance of Nanocrystalline Vis-À-Vis Microcrystalline Fe–Cr Alloys to Environmental Degradation and Challenges to Their Synthesis. Philosophical Magazine 90 (23):3233-3260.
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  19.  36
    Peter J. Li (2009). Exponential Growth, Animal Welfare, Environmental and Food Safety Impact: The Case of China's Livestock Production. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (3):217-240.
    Developmental states are criticized for rapid “industrialization without enlightenment.” In the last 30 years, China’s breathtaking growth has been achieved at a high environmental and food safety cost. This article, utilizing a recent survey of China’s livestock industry, illustrates the initiating role of China’s developmental state in the exponential expansion of the country’s livestock production. The enthusiastic response of the livestock industry to the many state policy incentives has made China the world’s biggest animal farming nation. Shortage of meat (...)
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  20.  67
    Gabriel Eweje (2006). Environmental Costs and Responsibilities Resulting From Oil Exploitation in Developing Countries: The Case of the Niger Delta of Nigeria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (1):27 - 56.
    Interest shown on the environmental impact of operations of multinational enterprises in developing countries has grown significantly recently, and has fuelled a heated public policy debate. In particular, there has been interest in the environmental degradation of host communities and nations resulting from the operations of multinational oil companies in developing countries. This article examines the issue of environmental costs and responsibilities resulting from oil exploitation and production in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The case (...)
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  21. Robert Elliot (1997). Faking Nature: The Ethics of Environmental Restoration. Routledge.
    Faking Nature explores the arguments surrounding the concept of ecological restoration. This is a crucial process in the modern world and is central to companies' environmental policy; whether areas restored after ecological destruction are less valuable than before the damage took place. Elliot discusses the pros and cons of the argument and examines the role of humans in the natural world. This volume is a timely and provocative analysis of the simultaneous destruction and restoration of the natural world and (...)
     
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  22.  12
    Lantz Miller (2012). The Moral Philosophy of Automobiles. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):637-655.
    Abstract The ethics of technology use has tended to arise from the theory of the role of technology in human life and society and thus introduces a bias into moral assessment of such use. I propose a dialectical method of morally assessing a technology use without such a preset notion. Instead the assumption is that the moral agent is as responsible for use of a technology as for any other moral action of the agent, that is, the individual’s use of (...)
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  23. Shierry Weber Nicholsen (2002). The Love of Nature and the End of the World the Unspoken Dimensions of Environmental Concern. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  24. Daniel C. Fouke (2012). Blameworthy Environmental Beliefs. Environmental Ethics 34 (2):115-134.
    Thomas Hill famously argued that what really bothers us about environmental degradation is best discovered by asking “What kind of person would do such a thing?” Beliefs, some of which are blameworthy, are among the things that define what kind of person one is. What we care about is reflected in whether one’s epistemic practices align with one’s core moral convictions and common standards of decency. Our moral sensitivities are reflected in what we attend to and reflect upon. (...)
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  25.  20
    Glen C. Filson (1993). Comparative Differences in Ontario Farmers' Environmental Attitudes. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (2):165-184.
    This paper provides an analysis of a 1991 survey of the views of a stratified random sample of 1,105 Ontario farmers. Factor analysis, Kruskal—Wallis one-way ANOVA, chi-square and correlations were used to identify differences in farmers' attitudes toward rural environmental issues as a function of their demographic and farm characteristics. Younger, well-educated farmers, especially if female, were most concerned about the seriousness of rural environmental degradation. The largest operators expressed the greatest support for the use of agricultural (...)
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  26. Ramona Cristina Ilea (2009). Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a (...)
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  27.  32
    Elena Fraj-Andrés, Eva Martinez-Salinas & Jorge Matute-Vallejo (2009). A Multidimensional Approach to the Influence of Environmental Marketing and Orientation on the Firm's Organizational Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):263 - 286.
    Since it implies a reduction in the quality and the quantity of the natural resources, environmental degradation is a present day problem that requires immediate solutions. This situation is driving firms to undertake an environmental transformation process with the purpose of reducing the negative externalities that come from their economic activities. Within this context, environmental marketing is an emerging business philosophy by which organizations can address sustainability issues. Moreover, environmental marketing and orientation are seen as (...)
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  28.  1
    Hermann Lion, Jerome D. Donovan & Rowan E. Bedggood (2013). Environmental Impact Assessments From a Business Perspective: Extending Knowledge and Guiding Business Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):789-805.
    Economic growth and development remain embedded in the very core of our current international economic system and the so called “material economy”. However, depleting natural resources and environmental degradation, which now threaten the well-being of future generations, has challenged this premise, and placed sustainable development as a necessary objective of business activity and expansion. Environmental impact assessments (EIAs) have emerged as a key tool for governments, businesses, and NGOs to manage the negative impact of their activities on (...)
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  29.  9
    Terrence Jantzi, John Schelhas & James P. Lassoie (1999). Environmental Values and Forest Patch Conservation in a Rural Costa Rican Community. Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):29-39.
    Although conservation attention has generally focused on large forest tracts, there is increasing evidence that smaller forest patches are important for both conservation and rural development. A study of forest patch conservation in a rural Costa Rican community found that, although forest patch conservation was influenced by landholding size, material factors did not account for all the variation in forest patches conservation behavior or conservation orientations of farmers. A qualitative interpretive approach, using semi-structured interviews, found that environmental values were (...)
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  30.  6
    Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare (2014). Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):617-631.
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis this (...)
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  31.  22
    Mohammad Khan & S. Shah (2011). Agricultural Development and Associated Environmental and Ethical Issues in South Asia. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):629-644.
    South Asia is one of the most densely populated regions of the world, where despite a slow growth, agriculture remains the backbone of rural economy as it employs one half to over 90 percent of the labor force. Both extensive and intensive policy measures for agriculture development to feed the massive population of the region have resulted in land degradation and desertification, water scarcity, pollution from agrochemicals, and loss of agricultural biodiversity. The social and ethical aspects portray even a (...)
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  32.  20
    Clive L. Spash (1993). Economics, Ethics, and Long-Term Environmental Damages. Environmental Ethics 15 (2):117-132.
    Neither environmental economics nor environmental philosophy have adequately examined the moral implications of imposing environmental degradation and ecosystem instability upon our descendants. A neglected aspect of these problems is the supposed extent of the burden that the current generation is placing on future generations. The standard economic position on discounting implies an ethicaljudgment concerning future generations. If intergenerational obligations exist, then two types of intergenerational transfer must be considered: basic distributional transfers and compensatory transfers. Basic transfers (...)
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  33.  20
    Thomas Heyd (2003). The Case for Environmental Morality. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):5-24.
    Present environmental degradation has led some to argue that only an appeal to selfishness will “save the environment,” allegedly because appeals to “morality” necessarily are ineffective, while others have suggested that we need a “new, environmental ethic.” If we are interested in countering the degradation of the natural environment, we need to reconsider actual morality, how it is developed, and how it may take into account human activities affecting the natural world. Ultimately, we need to develop (...)
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  34.  5
    Thomas Heyd (2003). The Case for Environmental Morality. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):5-24.
    Present environmental degradation has led some to argue that only an appeal to selfishness will “save the environment,” allegedly because appeals to “morality” necessarily are ineffective, while others have suggested that we need a “new, environmental ethic.” If we are interested in countering the degradation of the natural environment, we need to reconsider actual morality, how it is developed, and how it may take into account human activities affecting the natural world. Ultimately, we need to develop (...)
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  35. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. OUP Usa.
    A leading international expert on environmental issues, Shrader-Frechette brings a new standard of rigor to philosophical discussions of environmental justice in her latest work. Observing that environmental activists often value environmental concerns over basic human rights, she points out the importance of recognising that minority groups and the poor in general are frequently the biggest victims of environmental degradation, a phenomenon with serious social and political implications that the environmental movement has failed to (...)
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  36. Stephen R. Kellert (1996). The Value of Life Biological Diversity and Human Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  37. Wang Yi (2006). China's Environmental and Development Issues in Transition. Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (1):277-291.
    China has seen rapid economic development as well as severe environmental degradation over the past two decades. Although the Chinese government has made a great effort to provide environmental protection, it has been stymied by China’s economic development pattern, which follows the traditional industrialization mode of low efficiency in resource use and considerable pollutant discharge. In other words, China achieved its rapid economic growth at the cost of depleting natural resources and environmental quality. Should comprehensive and (...)
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  38. David Goldblatt (1996). Social Theory and the Environment. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  39.  15
    Frederik Dahlmann & Stephen Brammer (2008). The Longitudinal Development of Corporate Environmental Strategy in the U.S. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:343-359.
    Anecdotal evidence seems to suggest that firms are responding differently to the mounting concerns over environmental degradation and climate change. While a few studies at individual firm level do exist, relatively little is known about the longitudinal development of corporate environmental strategy at the population level of firms. Employing KLD data we explore the evolution of environmental strategy among a sample of S&P500 corporations over the period 1997 to 2006. We theoretically ground our study in Burgelman’s (...)
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  40.  12
    Michael Bruner & Max Oelschlaeger (1994). Rhetoric, Environmentalism, and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 16 (4):377-396.
    The growth of environmental ethics as an academic discipline has not been accompanied by any cultural movement toward sustainability. Indices of ecological degradation steadily increase, and many of the legislative gains made during the 1970s have been lost during the Reagan-Bush anti-environmental revolution. This situation gives rise to questions about the efficacy of ecophilosophical discourse. We argue (1) that these setbacks reflect, on the one hand, the skillful use of rhetorical tools by anti-environmental factions and, on (...)
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  41.  11
    Tomaž Grušovnik (2012). Environmental Denial: Why We Fail to Change Our Environmentally Damaging Practices. Synthesis Philosophica 27 (1):91-106.
    Despite readily available facts and figures regarding human-caused natural degradation, a large portion of the public still refuses to believe that the environment is suffering because of our actions. This refusal to believe, paired with a lack of environmental motivation, has become so evident that it recently attracted the attention of scientists and psychologists attempting to account for it from various perspectives. The disbelief in, for instance, climate change, is hard to explain without referring to a mechanism best (...)
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  42.  6
    Jack Dekker & Gary Comstock (1992). Ethical and Environmental Considerations in the Release of Herbicide Resistant Crops. Agriculture and Human Values 9 (3):31-43.
    Recent advances in molecular genetics, plant physiology, and biochemistry have opened up the new biotechnology of herbicide resistant crops (HRCs). Herbicide resistant crops have been characterized as the solution for many environmental problems associated with modern crop production, being described as powerful tools for farmers that may increase production options. We are concerned that these releases are occurring in the absence of forethought about their impact on agroecosystems, the broader landscape, and the rural and urban economies and cultures. Many (...)
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  43.  5
    David Strong (1995). Crazy Mountains: Learning From Wilderness to Weigh Technology. State University of New York Press.
    In the tradition of Walden and A River Runs Through It, this is a vivid account of the Crazy Mountains in Montana, urging us to awaken from the spell of technology.
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  44.  6
    Corrina Steward (2007). From Colonization to “Environmental Soy”: A Case Study of Environmental and Socio-Economic Valuation in the Amazon Soy Frontier. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (1):107-122.
    This paper examines the socio-economic and environmental implications of soy development in Santarém, Pará, located in the Brazilian Amazon. The settlement history of the region contributes directly to the way in which soy agriculture is currently proceeding in Santarém. Government policies and perspectives have been shaped by a history of agrarian colonization of Amazon forests, and the small farmers, or colonos, who are now being bought out by soy agribusiness are also rooted in this history. As a means of (...)
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  45.  5
    Andrew Light & Aurora Wallace (2005). Not Out of the Woods: Preserving the Human in Environmental Architecture. Environmental Values 14 (1):3 - 20.
    The North American environmental movement has historically sought to redress the depletion and degradation of natural resources that has been the legacy of the industrial revolution. Predominant in this approach has been the preservation of wilderness, conservation of species biodiversity and the restoration of natural ecosystems. While the results of such activity have often been commendable, several scholars have pointed out that the environmental movement has inherited an unfortunate bias against urban environments, and consequently, a blind spot (...)
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  46.  4
    Lourdes Tibán Guala (2012). Género y sustentabilidad: nuevos conceptos para el movimiento indígena. Polis 9.
    El artículo aborda los conceptos de género y sustentabilidad, para luego pasar a ver cómo éstos son percibidos por el movimiento indígena, y revisar si en su apropiación han ido o no más allá de la teoría. A continuación aborda la relación entre pobreza y degradación ambiental, cuestionando la acusación que se hace al indígena de la crisis ambiental en el mundo, y la consecuente exigencia de los países ricos a los países pobres para que sobre esta premisa sean quienes (...)
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  47.  8
    David W. Kidner (1994). Why Psychology is Mute About the Environmental Crisis. Environmental Ethics 16 (4):359-376.
    Psychology, often defined as the science of human behavior, has so far had little to say about the environmental destruction which is currently occurring as the result of human behavior. I consider the reasons why it has not and suggest that the ideological preconceptions that underpin the discipline are similar to those of the technological-economic system that is largely responsible for degradation ofthe environment. Psychology, by normalizing the behavioral, life-style, and personality configurations associated with environmental destruction, and (...)
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  48.  1
    Francisco González Cruz (2009). Desarrollo humano sustentable local. Polis 22.
    El propósito de este ensayo es demostrar que el concepto del desarrollo humano sostenible está relacionado al desarrollo de nuevos paradigmas científicos, lo que le da una excelente base de epistemológica. La validez y el crecimiento de su importancia no se refiere sólo a su preocupación por la degradación ambiental del planeta, sino también a la consecuencia lógica de una nueva mirada a la realidad, fundamentalmente por el abandono de los postivistas racionalistas tan inclinados hacia el determinismo optimista y por (...)
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  49. Ramón López & Michael A. Toman (eds.) (2006). Economic Development and Environmental Sustainability: New Policy Options. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Economic growth as we know it today cannot persist indefinitely if it entails continuous degradation of natural resources and the environment. While in a few countries around the world it appears that environmental degradation has been the result of rapid economic growth, in the vast majority of the developing countries the environment has been equally spoiled despite slow or even negative economic growth. This book provides new insights on the common roots of economic stagnation, poverty and (...) degradation which, unfortunately, generally reside in misguided government policies and priorities. By doing this, the volume seeks to provide a broader policy option framework than those found in conventional policy analyses, mainly dominated by the "Washington Consensus". It shows that a major omission of the conventional view is that governments tend to allocate government expenditures in a biased way favouring subsidies to the economic elites to the detriment of investments in public goods, including human capital, R&D, as well as the development of institutions, which are vital for long run growth, poverty reduction and environmental sustainability. (shrink)
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  50. Ramón López & Michael A. Toman (eds.) (2006). Economic Development and Environmental Sustainability: New Policy Options. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Economic growth as we know it today cannot persist indefinitely if it entails continuous degradation of natural resources and the environment. While in a few countries around the world it appears that environmental degradation has been the result of rapid economic growth, in the vast majority of the developing countries the environment has been equally spoiled despite slow or even negative economic growth. This book provides new insights on the common roots of economic stagnation, poverty and (...) degradation which, unfortunately, generally reside in misguided government policies and priorities. By doing this, the volume seeks to provide a broader policy option framework than those found in conventional policy analyses, mainly dominated by the "Washington Consensus". It shows that a major omission of the conventional view is that governments tend to allocate government expenditures in a biased way favouring subsidies to the economic elites to the detriment of investments in public goods, including human capital, R&D, as well as the development of institutions, which are vital for long run growth, poverty reduction and environmental sustainability. (shrink)
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