Search results for 'Environmental economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Giuseppe Munda (1997). Environmental Economics, Ecological Economics, and the Concept of Sustainable Development. Environmental Values 6 (2):213 - 233.
    This paper presents a systematic discussion, mainly for non-economists, on economic approaches to the concept of sustainable development. As a first step, the concept of sustainability is extensively discussed. As a second step, the argument that it is not possible to consider sustainability only from an economic or ecological point of view is defended; issues such as economic-ecological integration, inter-generational and intra-generational equity are considered of fundamental importance. Two different economic approaches to environmental issues, i.e. neo-classical environmental (...) and ecological economics, are compared. Some key differences such as weak versus strong sustainability, commensurability versus incommensurability and ethical neutrality versus different values acceptance are pointed out. (shrink)
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  2.  9
    John M. Gowdy & Peg Olsen (1994). Further Problems with Neoclassical Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):161-171.
    We examine the merits of neoclassical environmental economics and discuss alternative approaches to it. We argue that the basic assumptions of the neoclassical approach, embodied in the indifference curve, make that model inappropriate for environmental analysis. We begin by assuming that the basic postulates of the neoclassical model hold and then argue that even this ideal state is incompatible with environmental sustainability. We discuss the role of the discount rate, the exclusive emphasis on marginal choices, and (...)
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  3.  13
    Steve Vanderheiden (2005). Missing the Forest for the Trees: Justice and Environmental Economics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (1):51-69.
    The field of environmental economics, while offering powerful tools for the diagnosis of environmental problems and the design of policy solutions to them, is unable to effectively incorporate normative concepts like justice or rights into its method of analysis, and so needs to be supplemented by a consideration of such concepts. I examine the two main schools of thought in environmental economics ? the New Resource Economics and Free Market Environmentalism ? in order to (...)
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  4.  41
    Mark Sagoff (1988). Some Problems with Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 10 (1):55-74.
    In this essay I criticize the contigent valuation method in resource economics and the concepts of utility and efficiency upon which it is based. I consider an example of this method and argue that it cannot-as it pretends-substitute for public education and political deliberation.
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  5.  4
    Mohammed H. I. Dore (1996). The Problem of Valuation in Neoclassical Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):65-70.
    In this paper I argue that the criterion of valuation in neoclassical economics is flawed because it is not an invariant measure of value. It is invariant only when unrealistically restrictive conditions are imposed on the class of admissible utility functions, which in fact makes it a special case. The only sensible alternative is to turn to classical value theory based on real sacrifices or opportunity costs.
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  6.  10
    Mohammed H. I. Dore (1996). The Problem of Valuation in Neoclassical Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):65-70.
    In this paper I argue that the criterion of valuation in neoclassical economics is flawed because it is not an invariant measure of value. It is invariant only when unrealistically restrictive conditions are imposed on the class of admissible utility functions, which in fact makes it a special case. The only sensible alternative is to turn to classical value theory based on real sacrifices or opportunity costs.
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  7.  10
    Mohammed H. I. Dore (1996). The Problem of Valuation in Neoclassical Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):65-70.
    In this paper I argue that the criterion of valuation in neoclassical economics is flawed because it is not an invariant measure of value. It is invariant only when unrealistically restrictive conditions are imposed on the class of admissible utility functions, which in fact makes it a special case. The only sensible alternative is to turn to classical value theory based on real sacrifices or opportunity costs.
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  8.  2
    Mark Sagoff (1994). Four Dogmas of Environmental Economics. Environmental Values 3 (4):285 - 310.
    Four dogmas have shaped modern neoclassical economics. The first proposes that markets may fail to allocate resources efficiently, that is, to those willing to pay the most for them. The second asserts that choices, particularly within markets, reveal preferences. The third is the assumption that people always make the choices they expect will benefit them or enhance their welfare. The fourth dogma holds that perfectly competitive markets will allocate resources to their most beneficial uses. This is the doctrine of (...)
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  9.  19
    Clive L. Spash (1993). Economics, Ethics, and Long-Term Environmental Damages. Environmental Ethics 15 (2):117-132.
    Neither environmental economics nor environmental philosophy have adequately examined the moral implications of imposing environmental degradation and ecosystem instability upon our descendants. A neglected aspect of these problems is the supposed extent of the burden that the current generation is placing on future generations. The standard economic position on discounting implies an ethicaljudgment concerning future generations. If intergenerational obligations exist, then two types of intergenerational transfer must be considered: basic distributional transfers and compensatory transfers. Basic transfers (...)
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  10.  14
    Steven E. Edwards (1987). In Defense of Environmental Economics. Environmental Ethics 9 (1):73-85.
    The appropriateness of economic valuations of the natural environment is defended on the basis of an objective analysis of individuals’ preferences. The egoistic model of “economic man” substantiates economic valuations of instrumental values even when markets do not exist and when consumption and use are not involved. However, “altruistic man’s” genuine commitment to the well-being of others, particularly wildlife and future generations, challenges economic valuations at a fundamental level. In this case, self-interest and an indifference between states of the world (...)
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  11.  10
    Roger Paden (1994). Free Trade and Environmental Economics. Agriculture and Human Values 11 (1):47-54.
    In this paper, I argue that there is no essential inconsistency between a well-constructed free trade policy and environmental sound development. From an examination of the concept of “free trade,” I argue that “free trade” must mean “environmentally sustainable trade.” The argument is conceptual in nature. I argue that free trade must mean trade free of subsidies in which the price of a good fairly reflects the costs of its production. I then argue that environmentally unsustainable commodity trade is (...)
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  12. M. K. Deblonde (2000). Environmental Economics: The Meaning of an 'Objective' Policy Science. Environmental Values 9 (2):235-248.
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  13.  2
    C. Green (1993). Oil and Water? Environmental Economics and Environmental Ethics. Global Bioethics 6 (1):21-28.
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  14.  8
    Peter G. Stillman (1984). Morality, Economics, and Environmental Policy. Environmental Ethics 6 (1):95-96.
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  15. Peter Kaderjak & John Powell (2001). Economics for Environmental Policy in Transition Economies: An Analysis of the Hungarian Experience. Environmental Values 10 (4):560-561.
     
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  16. J. Kallo (2001). Peter Kaderjak and John Powell (Eds) Economics for Environmental Policy in Transition Economies. Environmental Values 10 (4):560-560.
     
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  17. Eugene A. Philipps (1990). The Economics of Environmental Quality. Environmental Ethics 101:117.
     
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  18. C. Spash (1999). The Development of Environmental Thinking in Economics. Environmental Values 8 (4):413-435.
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  19. R. Kerry Turner, Ian Bateman & Neil Adger (2002). Economics of Coastal and Water Resources: Valuing Environmental Functions. Environmental Values 11 (4):528-530.
     
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  20. Donald Vandeveer, Christine Pierce, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, J. Clarke & Derek Wall (1994). The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book: Philosophy, Ecology, Economics. Environmental Values 3 (3):280-282.
     
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  21.  2
    Julie A. Nelson (2015). Is Dismissing Environmental Caution the Manly Thing to Do?: Gender and the Economics of Environmental Protection. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):99-122.
    Not understanding that doing nothing can be much more preferable to doing something potentially harmful. Recent developments in cognitive science have highlighted the power that stories, metaphors, and archetypes have on human thinking. In fact, to a large extent they are our thinking. Consider the archetypal image of the young adult male hero. He is brave, active, adventurous, innovative, knowledgeable, clever, confident, independent, in control, and not constrained by family, tradition, or public opinion. He is a character that appears in (...)
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  22.  13
    J. Barkley Rosser, Complex Ecologic-Economic Dynamics and Environmental Policy Forthcoming, Ecological Economics.
    Various complex dynamics in ecologic-economic systems are presented with an emphasis upon models of global warming dynamics and fishery dynamics. Chaotic and catastrophic dynamic patterns are shown to be possible, along with other complex dynamics arising from nonlinearities in such combined systems. Problems associated with amplified oscillations due to these nonlinear interactions in the combined interactions of human economic decisionmaking with ecological dynamics are identified and discussed. Implications for policy are examined with strong recommendations for greater emphasis in particular upon (...)
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  23. H. Jaireth (2005). New Environmental Policy Instruments in the European Union: Politics, Economics, and the Implementation of the Packaging Waste Directive. By Ian Bailey. The European Legacy 10 (6):657.
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  24.  12
    Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (1997). Plural Values and Environmental Valuation. Environmental Values 6 (1):65 - 86.
    The paper discusses some of the criticisms of contingent valuation (CV) and allied techniques for estimating the intensity of peoples' preferences for the environment. The weakness of orthodox utilitarian assumptions in economics concerning the commensurability of all items entering into peoples' choices is discussed. The concept of commensurability is explored as is the problem of rational choice between incommensurate alternatives. While the frequent claim that the environment has some unique moral intrinsic value is unsustainable, its preservation often raises ethical (...)
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  25. John Foster (2000). Valuing Nature? Ethics, Economics and the Environment. Environmental Values 9 (1):122-124.
     
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  26.  27
    Fabien Medvecky (2012). Valuing Environmental Costs and Benefits in an Uncertain Future: Risk Aversion and Discounting. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):1-1.
    A central point of debate over environmental policies concerns how future costs and benefits should be assessed. The most commonly used method for assessing the value of future costs and benefits is economic discounting. One often-cited justification for discounting is uncertainty. More specifically, it is risk aversion coupled with the expectation that future prospects are more risky. In this paper I argue that there are at least two reasons for disputing the use of risk aversion as a justification for (...)
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  27.  11
    Michael Getzner, Clive L. Spash & Sigrid Stagl (eds.) (2005). Alternatives for Environmental Valuation. Routledge.
    How can we value the environment, this is the crucial issue that this book debates. The critical analyses carried out within the book by such figures as Nick Hanley and Jonathan Aldred are vital to ensuring that future economic growth is not achieved at the expense of our environment.
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  28. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original Buddhist sources, (...)
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  29.  25
    Mihaela Iftime (2011). A Nonlinear Method for Measuring the Effects of Environmental Variations. Foundations of Science 16 (4):353-361.
    Ever wonder if it is possible to construct a numeric scale for environmental variables, like one does for the temperature? This paper is an attempt to construct one. There are two main parts: section “Statistical Analysis of Variations” presents a general statistical strategy for environmental factor selection. Section “Nonlinear Analytical Geometric Model of Variations” develops an analytical geometric representation of system variations in response to environmental changes. The model is used to quantify the effects of environmental (...)
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  30.  4
    David Geoffrey Holdsworth (2012). Economics and the Limits of Optimization: Steps Towards Extending Bernard Hodgson's Moral Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):37-48.
    In this essay, my point of departure is Bernard Hodgson’s analysis of neo-classical economic theory and his demonstration that neo-classical economic thought is already a branch of normative theory. I undertake to broaden the demonstration by showing that other contemporary conceptions of economics are also irreducibly normative. The essay begins with an overview of Hodgson’s argument strategy, and a discussion of his thesis that economics is a moral science. This illustrates in what way moral presuppositions are at play (...)
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  31.  19
    Sheila Jasanoff (2012). Science and Public Reason. Routledge.
    This collection of essays by Sheila Jasanoff explores how democratic governments construct public reason, that is, the forms of evidence and argument used in making state decisions accountable to citizens.
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  32.  2
    Mara Rosas-Baños (2013). Nueva Ruralidad desde dos visiones de progreso rural y sustentabilidad: Economía Ambiental y Economía Ecológica. Polis 34.
    El desarrollo local desde principios de los años noventa se encuentra influenciado por una corriente sociológica que propone el replanteamiento teórico de lo que la teoría ha llamado el sector rural. La Nueva Ruralidad en su perspectiva latinoamericana ubica aspectos de cambio fundamental en el territorio rural: encadenamientos urbano-rurales, el empleo rural no agrícola, la provisión de servicios ambientales, las certificaciones agroambientales o “sellos verdes”, los pueblos como centros de servicios, el papel activo de las comunidades y organizaciones sociales, y (...)
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  33.  10
    Eugene C. Hargrove (2008). A Traditional and Multicultural Approach to Environmental Ethics at Primary and Secondary School Levels. Environmental Ethics 30 (3):263-271.
    Translating environmental ethics into something that can be taught at the primary and secondary school levels may never be feasible. In addition, what needs to be taught may vary in different cultures around the world. A good noncontroversial starting point may be to begin with the values that are often listed in the purpose statements of environmental laws. Teachers could teach the history of ideas behind those values and their relationship to environmental concern. This approach is needed (...)
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  34.  46
    Paul B. Thompson (2013). F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):517-521.
    F. Bailey Norwood and Jayson L. Lusk: Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9377-z Authors Paul B. Thompson, WK Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 South Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1032, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  35.  9
    R. J. Nelson (1979). Ethics and Environmental Decision Making. Environmental Ethics 1 (3):263-278.
    Environmental ethics tends to be dominated by the idea that the right environmental actions require a change in the value systems of many people. I argue that the “rebirth” approach is perverse in that moral attitudes are not easily changed by moral suasion. A properly ethical approach must begin where we are, as moderately moral people desiring the best for all. The real ethical problem is to develop procedures for collectively defining environmental ends that will be fair (...)
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  36.  5
    Kelly Parker (1993). Economics, Sustainable Growth, and Community. Environmental Values 2 (3):233 - 245.
    Sustainable growth is emerging as a normative concept in recent work in economics and environmental philosophy. This paper examines several kinds of growth, seeking to identify a sustainable form which could be adopted as normative for human society. The conceptions of growth expressed in standard economic theory, in the writings of John Dewey, and in population biology, each suggest particular accounts of how the lives of individuals and communities ought to be lived. I argue that, while absolute sustainablity (...)
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  37.  22
    Jeanne Kay Guelke (2004). Looking for Jesus in Christian Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 26 (2):115-134.
    Jesus’ teachings on neighborliness, frugality, support for the poor, and nonviolence should become more central to Christian environmental ethics. His actionoriented teachings do not explicitly mention nature, yet should have a beneficial collateral effect on environments when practiced by Christian communities. This issue affects Christian economics, simple causality models of environmental beliefs and impacts, and “love of nature” theology.
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  38.  10
    Kenneth Sayre (1991). An Alternative View of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 13 (3):195-213.
    Environmental ethics continues to be dominated by an in/erential view of ethical theory, according to which moral prescriptions and proscriptions are deduced from general principles, which in turn are arrived at intuitively or by some form of induction. I argue that the inferential approach contributes litde to the pressing need which environmental philosophers have been attempting to address in recent decades-the need for a set of normative values actually in place within industrial society that will help preserve the (...)
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  39.  14
    Alicia Irene Bugallo & María Teresa La Valle (2012). Some Initial Approaches to Environmental Philosophy in Argentina. Environmental Ethics 34 (4):411-421.
    Specific legislation in Argentina followed in the wake of the 1992 Earth Summit, with increased citizen awareness and growing academic concern from various philosophical perspectives. The current lines of research of the main work groups include (a) interdisciplinary work on environ­mental ethics and global environmental justice focused on natural resources and ecosystems, (b) the ecologically appropriate roots of the cultural heritage of Western civilization, and (c) gestalt ontology, deep ecology, and ecosophy. The emergence of ecophilosophy has required environmental (...)
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  40.  18
    Robert Frodeman (2004). Environmental Philosophy and the Shaping of Public Policy. Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):6-12.
    The standard approach to environmental issues today is to turn to science, economics, or democratic populism as a means to resolve our environmental debates. Environmental philosophers, on the other hand, focus on the theoretical underpinnings of environmental issues, with possibly a brief reference to a specific case or example. A policy turn in environmental philosophy involves a third way, where philosophers begin from society’s own growing sense of the inadequacy of our conventional ways of (...)
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  41.  2
    Andrew Brennan (1994). Environmental Literacy and Educational Ideal. Environmental Values 3 (1):3 - 16.
    Environmental literacy is not encouraged by discipline-based education. Discipline-based education is damaging not only because it breaks the link between experience and theory but also because it encourages learners to believe that complex practical problems can be solved using the resources of just one or two specialist disciplines or frameworks of thought. It is argued that discipline-based education has been extremely successful, and its very success is a factor which explains some of our poor thinking about environmental problems. (...)
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  42.  8
    Robert C. Oelhaf (1979). Environmental Ethics: Atomistic Abstraction or Holistic Affection? Environmental Ethics 1 (4):329-339.
    For conventional economics things have value only to the degree that they give pleasure to individual human beings. In response to continuing environmental deterioration several alternatives have been offered for valuing resources and allocating them between generations. Most of these approaches are highly abstract. The deterioration of the Earth and the mistreatment of its inhabitants will not be stemmed by abstractions. Neither will abstract ideas direct us to the best use of our resources. We need to foster personal (...)
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  43.  8
    Michael Lockwood (1999). Humans Valuing Nature: Synthesising Insights From Philosophy, Psychology and Economics. Environmental Values 8 (3):381 - 401.
    A rational process for assessment of environmental policy options should be based on an appreciation of how humans value nature. Increased understanding of values will also contribute to the development of appropriate ways for us to relate to and manage natural areas. Over the past two decades, environmental philosophers have examined the notion that there is an intrinsic value in nature. Economists have attempted to define and measure the market and nonmarket economic values associated with decisions concerning natural (...)
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  44.  11
    Maria Davradou & Paul Wood (2000). The Promotion of Individual Autonomy in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 22 (1):73-84.
    In his book The Morality of Freedom, Joseph Raz argues that the promotion of personal autonomy can serve as a constitutive principle for a comprehensive political theory. He maintains that three conditions are necessary for attainment of individual autonomy: appropriate mental abilities, an adequate range of options, and independence. In this essay, by focusing on Raz’s conception of an adequate range of options, we suggest that Raz’s theory justifies environmental conservation in general. We present an empirical framework of present-day (...)
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  45.  11
    R. J. Nelson (1979). Ethics and Environmental Decision Making. Environmental Ethics 1 (3):263-278.
    Environmental ethics tends to be dominated by the idea that the right environmental actions require a change in the value systems of many people. I argue that the “rebirth” approach is perverse in that moral attitudes are not easily changed by moral suasion. A properly ethical approach must begin where we are, as moderately moral people desiring the best for all. The real ethical problem is to develop procedures for collectively defining environmental ends that will be fair (...)
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  46.  15
    Alfred Endres (2004). Game Theory and Global Environmental Policy. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):123-139.
    Economists interpret global environmental quality to be a pure public good. Each country should contribute to its provision. However, this is hard to achieve because each government is tempted to take a free ride on the other governments' efforts. Not only has this dilemma been analysed with game theoretical methods but game theory has also been used to think about how to make amends. This paper reviews the game theoretical discussion on how international policy frameworks may be designed to (...)
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  47.  8
    Leire Escajedo San-Epifanio & Mickey Gjerris (2012). Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics From EURSAFE 2010. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):793-796.
    Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics from EURSAFE 2010 Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9390-2 Authors Leire Escajedo San-Epifanio, Department of Constitutional Law and History of Political Thought, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain Mickey Gjerris, Faculty of Science, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN (...)
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  48.  9
    Paul Wood (2000). The Promotion of Individual Autonomy in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 22 (1):73-84.
    In his book The Morality of Freedom, Joseph Raz argues that the promotion of personal autonomy can serve as a constitutive principle for a comprehensive political theory. He maintains that three conditions are necessary for attainment of individual autonomy: appropriate mental abilities, an adequate range of options, and independence. In this essay, by focusing on Raz’s conception of an adequate range of options, we suggest that Raz’s theory justifies environmental conservation in general. We present an empirical framework of present-day (...)
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  49.  6
    Maria Luisa Eschenhagen (2012). Approaches to Enrique Leff's Environmental Thought. Environmental Ethics 34 (4):423-429.
    Enrique Leff holds that the profound causes of the environmental crisis are founded in dominant ways of knowing; that is to say, the crisis is rooted in the epistemological bases of modernity. Leff has systematically dedicated himself to proposing and constructing concepts that deconstruct modern suppositions, and at the same time, enable new ways of understanding and apprehending the world. His extensive work has succeeded in transcending and forging space for environmental thought, not only in education and (...) philosophy, but also in the areas of economics, sociology, and development. His central argument is that these problems are the result of a crisis of civilization, and he urges all of us to rethink the foundations of modern rationality underlying contemporary global society. (shrink)
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  50.  2
    David Pearce (1992). Green Economics. Environmental Values 1 (1):3 - 13.
    Economists assume that people are fundamentally greedy, though not exclusively so. If environmental improvement is to be achieved, it will require policies that use selfishness rather than opposing it. Such policies are to be found in the basics of green economics in which market signals are modified by environmental taxes and tradeable pollution certificates to 'decouple' the economic growth process from its environmental impact. Green economic policies avoid the infringements of human liberties implied in ever stronger (...)
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