Search results for 'Environmental ethics Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul W. Taylor (2011). Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics. Princeton University Press.
    What rational justification is there for conceiving of all living things as possessing inherent worth? In Respect for Nature, Paul Taylor draws on biology, moral philosophy, and environmental science to defend a biocentric environmental ethic in which all life has value. Without making claims for the moral rights of plants and animals, he offers a reasoned alternative to the prevailing anthropocentric view--that the natural environment and its wildlife are valued only as objects for human use or enjoyment. (...)
     
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  2.  66
    Ben A. Minteer, Elizabeth A. Corley & Robert E. Manning (2004). Environmental Ethics Beyond Principle? The Case for a Pragmatic Contextualism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):131-156.
    Many nonanthropocentric environmental ethicists subscribe to a ``principle-ist'''' approach to moral argument, whereby specific natural resource and environmental policy judgments are deduced from the prior articulation of a general moral principle. More often than not, this principle is one requiring the promotion of the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. Yet there are several problems with this method of moral reasoning, including the short-circuiting of reflective inquiry and the disregard of the complex nature of specific environmental problems and (...)
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  3.  61
    Martin Drenthen (1999). The Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and the Wild. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):163-175.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophycan be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, (...) ethics is a highly paradoxical project. According to Nietzsche, each moral interpretation of nature implies a conceptual seizure of power over nature. On the other hand, Nietzsche argues, the concept of nature is indispensable in ethics because we have to interpret nature in order to have a meaningful relation with reality. I show that awareness of this paradox opens a way for a form of respect for nature as radical otherness. (shrink)
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  4.  8
    Samantha Noll (2015). History Lessons: What Urban Environmental Ethics Can Learn From Nineteenth Century Cities. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):143-159.
    In this paper, I outline valuable insights that current theorists working in urban environmental ethics can gain from the analysis of nineteenth century urban contexts. Specifically, I argue that an analysis of urban areas during this time reveals two sets of competing metaphysical commitments that, when accepted, shift both the design of urban environments and our relationship with the natural world in these contexts. While one set of metaphysical commitments could help inform current projects in urban environmental (...)
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  5.  2
    Emma Rush (2015). A Gaitan Account of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 37 (2):187-206.
    An environmental ethics mirroring the distinctive account given by Raimond Gaita of human ethics offers a number of advantages. By understanding the moral significance of individuals to be related primarily to whether they are intelligible objects of love, a Gaitan environmental ethics clarifies the conceptual connections between experiences familiar to those who affirm environmental value: perception of intrinsic value in nature, love of particular natural things or places, an expanded sense of depth of meaning (...)
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  6.  9
    Humberto D. Rosa & Jorge Marques Da Silva (2005). From Environmental Ethics to Nature Conservation Policy: Natura 2000 and the Burden of Proof. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):107-130.
    Natura 2000 is a network of natural sites whose aim is to preserve species and habitats of relevance in the European Union. The policy underlying Natura 2000 has faced widespread opposition from land users and received extensive support from environmentalists. This paper addresses the ethical framework for Natura 2000 and the probable moral assumptions of its main stakeholders. Arguments for and against Natura 2000 were analyzed and classified according to “strong” or “weak” versions of the three main theories of (...) ethics – anthropocentrism, biocentrism, and ecocentrism. Weak (intergenerational) anthropocentrism was found to underlie the Natura 2000 network itself and the positions of environmentalists, while strong (traditional) anthropocentrism pervaded the positions of economic developers. Land users seemed to fall somewhere between weak and strong anthropocentrism. The paper discusses the relation between ethics and different attitudes towards Natura 2000, highlighting some of the implications for the network’s ongoing implementation. It is shown that Natura 2000 achieves a strong reversal of the burden of proof from conservation to economic development and land use change under anthropocentrism. It is argued that the alleged theoretical divide between anthropocentrism and non-anthropocentrism in relation to the burden of proof does not seem to hold in practice. Finally, it is predicted that the weak versions of anthropocentrism, biocentrism, and ecocentrism, are likely to converge extensively in respect to nature conservation policy measures. (shrink)
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  7. Gary E. Varner (1998). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle (...)
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  8.  52
    R. Sandler & P. Cafaro (eds.) (2005). Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The first on the topic of environmental virtue ethics, this book seeks to provide the definitive anthology that will both establish the importance of ...
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  9. Eugene C. Hargrove (1992). Foundations of Environmental Ethics. Philosophy East and West 42 (1):175-177.
    This book examines the social and philosophical attitudes in Western culture that relate to the environment including aesthetics, wildlife, and land use. Both the historical significance and a framework for further discussions of environmental ethics are discussed in the book.
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  10.  28
    Ching-Hsun Chang (2011). The Influence of Corporate Environmental Ethics on Competitive Advantage: The Mediation Role of Green Innovation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):361-370.
    This study utilizes structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the positive effect of corporate environmental ethics on competitive advantage in the Taiwanese manufacturing industry via the mediator: green innovation performance. This study divides green innovation into green product innovation and green process innovation. The empirical results show that corporate environmental ethics positively affects green product innovation and green process innovation. In addition, this study verifies that green product innovation mediates the positive relationship between corporate environmental (...)
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  11.  77
    Shane Epting (2010). Questioning Technology's Role in Environmental Ethics: Weak Anthropocentrism Revisited. Interdisciplinary Environmental Review 11 (1):18-26.
    Environmental ethics has mostly been practiced separately from philosophy of technology, with few exceptions. However, forward thinking suggests that environmental ethics must become more interdisciplinary when we consider that almost everything affects the environment. Most notably,technology has had a huge impact on the natural realm. In the following discussion, the notions of synthesising philosophy of technology and environmental ethics are explored with a focus on research, development, and policy.
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  12. Rosamund M. Thomas (ed.) (1993). Teaching Ethics: Cambridge Conference Proceedings, 1989-1993. Centre for Business and Public Sector Ethics.
     
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  13. William J. McKinney (1996). Prediction and Rolston's Environmental Ethics: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):429-440.
    Rolston (1988) argues that in order to act ethically in the environment, moral agents must assume that their actions are potentially harmful, and then strive to prove otherwise before implementing that action. In order to determine whether or not an action in the environment is harmful requires the tools of applied epistemology in order to act in accord with Rolston’s ethical prescription. This link between ethics and epistemology demands a closer look at the relationship between confirmation theory, particularly notions (...)
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  14.  46
    Karyn L. Lai (2003). Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical (...)
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  15.  8
    Barbara Muraca (2011). The Map of Moral Significance: A New Axiological Matrix for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 20 (3):375 - 396.
    One main issue within environmental ethics is the so-called Demarcation Problem, i.e. the question of which entities are members of the moral community and hold intrinsic value. I argue that the demarcation problem relies mainly on Kantian moral philosophy. While the Kantian framework offers a strong and immediately deontological argument for moral agents holding inherent moral values, it presents problems when stretched beyond its original scope and lacks an adequate ground for addressing relational complexity and the moral significance (...)
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  16.  20
    Mirjam de Groot, Martin Drenthen & Wouter T. de Groot (2011). Public Visions of the Human/Nature Relationship and Their Implications for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):25-44.
    A social scientific survey on visions of human/nature relationships in western Europe shows that the public clearly distinguishes not only between anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, but also between two nonanthropocentric types of thought, which may be called “partnership with nature” and “participation in nature.” In addition, the respondents distinguish a form of human/nature relationship that is allied to traditional stewardship but has a more ecocentric content, labeled here as “guardianship of nature.” Further analysis shows that the general public does not subscribe (...)
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  17.  18
    James B. Gerrie (2003). Environmental Ethics: Should We Preserve the Red Herring and Flounder? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (1):63-76.
    Based on a survey of some popularintroductory anthologies and texts, I arguefrom my experience as a philosopher oftechnology that environmental philosophy mightbe conceived by some researchers in the fieldin terms of an overly narrow theoreticalfoundation. Many of the key figures in thefield take as a basic assumption that theenvironmental crisis is fundamentally bestexplained in terms of some failing in themetaphysical outlooks of most people. However,philosophers of technology typically present atleast two additional types of generalexplanation of the crisis. Environmentalethicists might (...)
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  18.  15
    Pak‐Hang Wong (2015). Confucian Environmental Ethics, Climate Engineering, and the “Playing God” Argument. Zygon 50 (1):28-41.
    The burgeoning literature on the ethical issues raised by climate engineering has explored various normative questions associated with the research and deployment of climate engineering, and has examined a number of responses to them. While researchers have noted the ethical issues from climate engineering are global in nature, much of the discussion proceeds predominately with ethical framework in the Anglo-American and European traditions, which presume particular normative standpoints and understandings of human–nature relationship. The current discussion on the ethical issues, therefore, (...)
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  19. Toby Svoboda (2012). Duties Regarding Nature: A Kantian Approach to Environmental Ethics. Kant Yearbook 4 (1):143-163.
    Many philosophers have objected to Kant’s account of duties regarding non-human nature, arguing that it does not ground adequate moral concern for non-human natural entities. However, the traditional interpretation of Kant on this issue is mistaken, because it takes him to be arguing merely that humans should abstain from animal cruelty and wanton destruction of flora solely because such actions could make one more likely to violate one’s duties to human beings. Instead, I argue, Kant’s account of duties regarding nature (...)
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  20. Christine James (2005). Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1).
    The history of sonar technology provides a fascinating case study for philosophers of science. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has begun (...)
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  21.  51
    Andrew Light (2002). Contemporary Environmental Ethics From Metaethics to Public Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 33 (4):426-449.
    In the past thirty years environmental ethics has emerged as one of the most vibrant and exciting areas of applied philosophy. Several journals and hundreds of books testify to its growing importance inside and outside philosophical circles. But with all of this scholarly output, it is arguably the case that environmental ethics is not living up to its promise of providing a philosophical contribution to the resolution of environmental problems. This article surveys the current state (...)
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  22.  47
    James Dwyer (2009). How to Connect Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: Health, Sustainability, and Justice. Bioethics 23 (9):497-502.
    In this paper, I explore one way to bring bioethics and environmental ethics closer together. I focus on a question at the interface of health, sustainability, and justice: How well does a society promote health with the use of no more than a just share of environmental capacity? To address this question, I propose and discuss a mode of assessment that combines a measurement of population health, an estimate of environmental sustainability, and an assumption about what (...)
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  23.  5
    Clare Palmer, Katie McShane & Ron Sandler (2014). Environmental Ethics. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 39:419-442.
    Environmental ethics—the study of ethical questions raised by human relations with the nonhuman environment—emerged as an important subfield of philosophy during the 1970s. It is now a flourishing area of research. This article provides a review of the secular, Western traditions in the field. It examines both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric claims about what has value, as well as divergent views about whether environmental ethics should be concerned with bringing about best consequences, respecting principles and rights, or (...)
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  24.  8
    M. Drenthen (2013). New Nature Narratives. Landscape Hermeneutics and Environmental Ethics. In Forrest Clingerman, Martin Drenthen, Brian Treanor & David Utsler (eds.), Interpreting Nature. The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics. Fordham University Press 225-241.
    In this paper, I seek to provide building blocks for a reconciliation of the ethical care for heritage protection and nature restoration ethics. It will do so, by introducing a hermeneutic landscape philosophy that takes landscape as a multi-layered “text” in need of interpretation, and place identities as build upon certain readings of the landscape. I will argue that from a hermeneutic perspective, both approaches appear to complement each other. Renaturing presents a valuable correction to the anthropocentrism of many (...)
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  25.  15
    T. L. S. Sprigge & Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). A Morally Deep World: An Essay on Moral Significance and Environmental Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):378.
    Lawrence Johnson advocates a major change in our attitude toward the nonhuman world. He argues that nonhuman animals, and ecosystems themselves, are morally significant beings with interests and rights. The author considers recent work in environmental ethics in the introduction and then presents his case with the utmost precision and clarity. Written in an attractive, nontechnical style, the book will be of particular interest to philosophers, environmentalists and ecologists.
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  26.  50
    Jeffrey G. York (2009). Pragmatic Sustainability: Translating Environmental Ethics Into Competitive Advantage. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):97 - 109.
    In this article, I propose a business paradigm that allows and enables the integration of environmental ethics into business decisions while creating a competitive advantage through the use of an ethical framework based on classical American pragmatism. Environmental ethics could be useful as an alternative paradigm for business ethics by offering new perspectives and methodologies to grant consideration of the natural environment. An approach based on classical American pragmatism provides a superior framework for businesses by (...)
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  27.  11
    Francis Noortgaete & Johan Tavernier (2014). Affected by Nature: A Hermeneutical Transformation of Environmental Ethics. Zygon 49 (3):572-592.
    The value-action gap poses a considerable challenge to normative environmental ethics. Because of the wide array of empirical research results that have become available in the fields of environmental psychology, education, and anthropology, ethicists are at present able to take into account insights on what effectively motivates proenvironmental behavior. The emotional aspect apparently forms a key element within a transformational process that leads to an internalization of nature within one's identity structure. We compare these findings with studies (...)
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  28.  47
    John Benson (2000). Environmental Ethics: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.
    Presupposing no prior knowledge of philosophy, John Benson introduces the reader to one fundamental question--whether a concern with human well-being is an adequate basis for environmental ethics. The book explores this question by considering some of the techniques that have been used to value the environment and by critically examining "light green" to "deep green" environmentalism. Each chapter is then helpfully linked to a reading from key thinkers in the field and with the use of exercises, readers are (...)
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  29.  49
    Pragati Sahni (2008). Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. Routledge.
    This work gives an innovative approach to the subject, which puts forward a distinctly Buddhist environmental ethics that is in harmony with traditional ...
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  30.  37
    Douglas J. Buege (1996). An Ecologically-Informed Ontology for Environmental Ethics. Biology and Philosophy 12 (1):1-20.
    Since the inception of their subject as a distinct area of study in philosophy, environmental ethicists have quarreled over the choice of entities with which an environmental ethic should be concerned. A dichotomous ontology has arisen with the ethical atomists, e.g., Singer and Taylor, arguing for moral consideration of individual organisms and the holists, e.g., Rolston and Callicott, focussing on moral consideration of systems. This dichotomous view is ecologically misinformed and should be abandoned. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  31.  16
    Clare Palmer (1998). Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking. Clarendon Press.
    In this study, Clare Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She compares process ethics to a variety of other forms of environmental ethics, as well as deep ecology, and reveals a number of difficulties associated with process thinking about the environment.
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  32.  9
    Martin Drenthen (2009). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's critique of morality, (...)
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  33.  25
    Martin Drenthen (2002). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and Morality. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's critique of morality, (...)
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  34.  25
    Benjamin Hale (2008). Private Property and Environmental Ethics:. Some New Directions. Metaphilosophy 39 (3):402–421.
    This article argues that teachers of environmental ethics must more aggressively entertain questions of private property in their work and in their teaching. To make this case, it first introduces the three primary positions on property: occupation arguments, labor theory of value arguments, and efficiency arguments. It then contextualizes these arguments in light of the contemporary U.S. wise-use movement, in an attempt to make sense of the concerns that motivate wise-use activists, and also to demonstrate how intrinsic value (...)
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  35. Michael Boylan (ed.) (2001). Environmental Ethics. Prentice Hall.
    The second edition of _Environmental Ethics _combines a strong theoretical foundation with applications to some of the most pressing environmental problems. Through a mix of classic and new essays, it discusses applied issues such as pollution, climate change, animal rights, biodiversity, and sustainability. Roughly half of the selections are original essays new to this edition. Accessible introduction for beginners, including important established essays and new essays commissioned especially for the volume Roughly half of the selections are original essays (...)
     
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  36.  17
    Christopher G. Framarin (2014). HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. Routledge.
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
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  37. H. Odera Oruka (ed.) (1994). Philosophy, Humanity, and Ecology. African Academy of Sciences.
    v. 1. Philosophy of nature and environmental ethics.
     
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  38.  28
    Nin Kirkham (2013). Transcending Our Biology: A Virtue Ethics Interpretation of the Appeal to Nature in Technological and Environmental Ethics. Zygon 48 (4):875-889.
    “Arguments from nature” are used, and have historically been used, in popular responses to advances in technology and to environmental issues—there is a widely shared body of ethical intuitions that nature, or perhaps human nature, sets some limits on the kinds of ends that we should seek, the kinds of things that we should do, or the kinds of lives that we should lead. Virtue ethics can provide the context for a defensible form of the argument from (...)
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  39.  49
    Lori Gruen & William Ruddick (2009). Biomedical and Environmental Ethics Alliance: Common Causes and Grounds. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):457-466.
    In the late 1960s Van Rensselaer Potter, a biochemist and cancer researcher, thought that our survival was threatened by the domination of military policy makers and producers of material goods ignorant of biology. He called for a new field of Bioethics—“a science of survival.” Bioethics did develop, but with a narrower focus on medical ethics. Recently there have been attempts to broaden that focus to bring biomedical ethics together with environmental ethics. Though the two have many (...)
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  40.  26
    Stewart Duncan, Margaret Cavendish, Environmental Ethics, and Panpsychism.
    Draft for the “New Narratives in Philosophy” conference.
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  41.  5
    Paul B. Thompson (1994). The Spirit of the Soil: Agriculture and Environmental Ethics. Routledge.
    The Spirit of the Soil challenges environmentalists to think more deeply and creatively about agriculture. Paul B. Thompson identifies four `worldviews' which tackle agricultural ethics according to different philosophical priorities; productionism, stewardship, economics and holism. He examines current issues such as the use of pesticides and biotechnology from these ethical perspectives. This book achieves an open-ended account of sustainability designed to minimise hubris and help us to recapture the spirit of the soil.
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  42. Robert Elliot (1997). Faking Nature: The Ethics of Environmental Restoration. Routledge.
    Faking Nature explores the arguments surrounding the concept of ecological restoration. This is a crucial process in the modern world and is central to companies' environmental policy; whether areas restored after ecological destruction are less valuable than before the damage took place. Elliot discusses the pros and cons of the argument and examines the role of humans in the natural world. This volume is a timely and provocative analysis of the simultaneous destruction and restoration of the natural world and (...)
     
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  43.  37
    Daniel Gregorowius, Petra Lindemann-Matthies & Markus Huppenbauer (2012). Ethical Discourse on the Use of Genetically Modified Crops: A Review of Academic Publications in the Fields of Ecology and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):265-293.
    The use of genetically modified plants in agriculture (GM crops) is controversially discussed in academic publications. Important issues are whether the release of GM crops is beneficial or harmful for the environment and therefore acceptable, and whether the modification of plants is ethically permissible per se . This study provides a comprehensive overview of the moral reasoning on the use of GM crops expressed in academic publications from 1975 to 2008. Environmental ethical aspects in the publications were investigated. Overall, (...)
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  44.  76
    Willis Jenkins (2009). After Lynn White: Religious Ethics and Environmental Problems. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):283-309.
    The fields of environmental ethics and of religion and ecology have been shaped by Lynn White Jr.'s thesis that the roots of ecological crisis lie in religious cosmology. Independent critical movements in both fields, however, now question this methodological legacy and argue for alternative ways of inquiry. For religious ethics, the twin controversies cast doubt on prevailing ways of connecting environmental problems to religious deliberations because the criticisms raise questions about what counts as an environmental (...)
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  45.  18
    Gillian Rice (2006). Pro-Environmental Behavior in Egypt: Is There a Role for Islamic Environmental Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):373 - 390.
    Egypt, a less affluent, predominantly Muslim country, suffers from numerous forms of environmental pollution, some severe. This study investigates pro-environmental behaviors of citizens in Cairo, Egypt’s largest metropolis, and studies the relationship between pro-environmental behavior and demographic variables, beliefs, values, and religiosity. Analysis shows that three types of pro-environmental behavior are present: Public Sphere, Private Sphere, and Activist Behavior, with the latter occurring less frequently. Importantly, the study identifies an ecocentric value among respondents which is correlated (...)
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  46. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original (...)
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  47.  47
    Judith Kimerling (2001). Corporate Ethics in the Era of Globalization: The Promise and Peril of International Environmental Standards. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (4):425-455.
    The growing assumption thattransnational corporations (TNCs) will apply``best practice'''' and ``international standards''''in their operations in developing countries hasseldom been checked against close observationof corporate behavior. In this article, Ipresent a case study, based on field research,of one voluntary initiative to useinternational standards and best practice forenvironmental protection in the AmazonRainforest, by a US-based oil company,Occidental Petroleum (Oxy) in Ecuador. The moststriking finding is that the company refuses todisclose the precise standards that apply toits operations. This, and the refusal todisclose other (...)
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  48.  10
    Holmes Rolston (1990). [Book Review] Environmental Ethics, Duties to and Values in the Natural World. [REVIEW] Ethics 100:195-197.
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  49.  51
    Anna Peterson (2000). In and of the World? Christian Theological Anthropology and Environmental Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (3):237-261.
    Mainstream currents within Christianity havelong insisted that humans, among all creatures, areneither fully identified with their physical bodiesnor fully at home on earth. This essay outlines theparticular characteristics of Christian notions ofhuman nature and the implications of this separationfor environmental ethics. It then examines recentefforts to correct some damaging aspects oftraditional Christian understandings of humanity''splace in nature, especially the notions of physicalembodiment and human embeddedment in earth. Theprimary goal of the essay is not to offer acomprehensive (...)
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    Katie McShane (2011). Neosentimentalism and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):5-23.
    Neosentimentalism provides environmental ethics with a theory of value that might be particularly useful for solving many of the problems that have plagued the field since its early days. In particular, a neosentimentalist understanding of value offers us hope for making sense of (1) what intrinsic value might be and how we could know whether parts of the natural world have it; (2) the extent to which value is an essentially anthropocentric concept; and (3) how our understanding of (...)
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