Search results for 'Environmental protection Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alastair S. Gunn (2008). Buddhism and Environmental Ethics in Context. Centre for Civilisational Dialogue, University of Malaya.score: 360.0
     
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  2. Swedish Environmental Protection (unknown). Stig Wandén. Global Bioethics 14 (1-2001).score: 240.0
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  3. Padmasiri De Silva (1998). Environmental Philosophy and Ethics in Buddhism. St. Martin's Press.score: 192.0
    This work introduces the reader to the central issues and theories in Western environmental ethics, and against this background develops a Buddhist environmental philosophy and ethics. Drawing material from original sources, there is a lucid exposition of Buddhist environmentalism, its ethics, economics and Buddhist perspectives for environmental education. The work is focused on a diagnosis of the contemporary environmental crisis and a Buddhist contribution for positive solutions. Replete with stories and illustrations from original Buddhist sources, it (...)
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  4. Pragati Sahni (2008). Environmental Ethics in Buddhism: A Virtues Approach. Routledge.score: 192.0
    This work gives an innovative approach to the subject, which puts forward a distinctly Buddhist environmental ethics that is in harmony with traditional ...
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  5. Bstan-ʼ & Dzin-Rgya-Mtsho (2007). His Holiness the Xiv Dalai Lama on Environment: Collected Statements. Environment and Development Desk, Dept. Of Information and International Relations, Central Tibetan Administration.score: 180.0
  6. Bstan-ʼdzin-Rgya-Mtsho (2007). His Holiness the Xiv Dalai Lama on Environment: Collected Statements. Environment and Development Desk, Dept. Of Information and International Relations, Central Tibetan Administration.score: 180.0
     
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  7. Martin H. Lenihan & Kathryn J. Brasier (2009). Scaling Down the European Model of Agriculture: The Case of the Rural Environmental Protection Scheme in Ireland. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):365-378.score: 180.0
    Recent reforms of the Common Agricultural Policy have led to much discussion of the European multifunctional model of agriculture in both policy and academic circles. Accordingly, European agriculture provides numerous social and environmental benefits and as a result should be supported through a system of payments which directly target those benefits. The agri-environmental measures specified under pillar II of the Common Agricultural Policy are supposed to exemplify the multifunctional model of agriculture, and the macro-level debates surrounding the introduction (...)
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  8. Napoleon M. Mabaquiao (2002). Corporations and the Cause of Environmental Protection. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 12 (1):11-15.score: 168.0
    This essay deals with the following issues: (1) whether corporations can have moral responsibilities; (2) whether, granting that corporations can have moral responsibilities, nature can be an object of these responsibilities; and (3) what moral theory can appropriately justify why corporations ought to contribute to the cause of environmental protection. It is here argued that while it can be shown that corporations can have moral responsibilities, such responsibilities are limited towards humans and other corporations. The main reason is (...)
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  9. Jürgen S. Poesche (1996). Punishment in Environmental Protection. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (10):1071 - 1081.score: 168.0
    The fundamental character of a punishment is the subject of this paper. Based on the assumed function of a punishment (deterrent), a punishment has to be perceived and experienced to be an adverse result by the punished and the public. The first factor in particular means that the courts have to have flexibility to sentence a person to such a punishment that is experienced as such. The legal question becomes how this customization of a punishment is acceptable from an equality (...)
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  10. Peter C. Yeager (1992). The Politics of Efficiencies, the Efficiencies of Politics: States Vs. Markets in Environmental Protection. Critical Review 6 (2-3):231-253.score: 168.0
    In The Political Limits of Environmental Regulation: Tracking the Unicorn, Bruce Yandle identifies some of the key weaknesses of federal environmental regulation, including its regressive effects, its tendency to better serve selected political interests than the cause of environmental protection, and the EPA's failure to follow sensible priorities. Additional problems may also be cited, including the tendency to exclude citizens? voices from deliberations regarding the degree of pollution control. But Yandle's conclusion regarding the likely superiority of (...)
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  11. Albert Weale (1992). Nature Versus the State? Markets, States, and Environmental Protection. Critical Review 6 (2-3):153-170.score: 168.0
    Is it possible to reconcile a classical liberal approach to economics with a concern for the environment? The contributors to Economics and the Environment: A Reconciliation contend that it is. But they fail to distinguish properly between classical liberalism and a widespread orthodoxy in environmental policy communities in Europe and North America to the effect that economic instruments for environmental policy need more serious attention than they have hitherto received. Once this orthodoxy is distinguished from classical liberalism, the (...)
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  12. Yŏng-gyŏng Yi (ed.) (2011). Han'guk Ŭi Chŏnt'ong Sach'al: Chŏnt'ong Sach'al Ŭi Kongikchŏk Kach'i P'yŏngka Mit Kwalli. Taehan Pulgyo Chogyejong Ch'ongmuwŏn.score: 162.0
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  13. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.score: 156.0
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because (...)
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  14. Ned Hettinger (2005). Allen Carlson's Environmental Aesthetics and the Protection of the Environment. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):57-76.score: 154.0
    Evaluation of the contribution that Allen Carlson’s environmental aesthetics can make to environmental protection shows that Carlson’s positive aesthetics, his focus on the functionality of human environments for their proper aesthetic appreciation, and his integration of ethical concern with aesthetic appreciation all provide fruitful, though not unproblematic, avenues for an aesthetic defense of theenvironment.
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  15. Allayne Barrilleaux Pizzolatto & Cecil A. Zeringue (1993). Facing Society's Demands for Environmental Protection: Management in Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):441 - 447.score: 152.0
    Although managers must stay abreast of all socictal concerns in developing organizational objectives, protecting the environment seems to be a major issue for consumers in the 1990s. This increased environmental concern leaves managers no choice but to go beyond mere social obligation when it comes to protecting the environment. Society is demanding social responsiveness at a minimum, and the call for social responsibility seems to be getting louder and clearer. This paper reviews the response business has made to this (...)
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  16. Allayne Barrilleaux Pizzolatto & I. I. Zeringue (1993). Facing Society's Demands for Environmental Protection: Management in Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):441-447.score: 152.0
    Although managers must stay abreast of all socictal concerns in developing organizational objectives, protecting the environment seems to be a major issue for consumers in the 1990s. This increased environmental concern leaves managers no choice but to go beyond mere social obligation when it comes to protecting the environment. Society is demanding social responsiveness at a minimum, and the call for social responsibility seems to be getting louder and clearer. This paper reviews the response business has made to this (...)
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  17. Weiqun Yao (2006). Buddhist Thought and Several Problems in the World Today. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):144-147.score: 150.0
    Buddhism has not only produced an influence upon the ancient world culture but is also playing an important role in world affairs today. This article analyzes several important problems in the world today: world peace, disarmament, economic justice, human rights, environmental protection, and universal cooperation in world problem solving. The writer holds that, to solve these problems, we should study Buddhist theory and get some helpful ideas from it.
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  18. Simon P. James (2007). Against Holism: Rethinking Buddhist Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 16 (4):447 - 461.score: 150.0
    Environmental thinkers sympathetic to Buddhism sometimes reason as follows: (1) A holistic view of the world, according to which humans are regarded as being 'one' with nature, will necessarily engender environmental concern; (2) the Buddhist teaching of 'emptiness' represents such a view; therefore (3) Buddhism is an environmentally-friendly religion. In this paper, I argue that the first premise of this argument is false (a holistic view of the world can be reconciled with a markedly eco-unfriendly attitude) (...)
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  19. Holmes Rolston (1995). Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):735-752.score: 146.0
    The UNCED Earth Summit established two new principles of international justice: an equitable international order and protection of the environment. UNCED was a significant symbol, a morality play about environment and economics. Wealth is asymmetrically distributed; approximately one-fifth of the world (the G-7 nations) produces and consumes four-fifths of goods and services; four-fifths (the G-77 nations) get one-fifth. This distribution can be interpreted as both an earnings differential and as exploitation. Responses may require justice or charity, producing and sharing. (...)
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  20. Ji Li, Yali Tan, Hong Zhu, Zhenyao Cai & Susanna Y. F. Lo (2014). Environmental Protection of Panda Habitat in the Wolong Nature Reserve: A Chinese Perspective. Environmental Ethics 36 (2):187-202.score: 146.0
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  21. Margaret DeMerieux (2001). Deriving Environmental Rights From the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):521-561.score: 144.0
    This article examines the way in which the organs of the European Human Rights Convention have dealt with cases involving ‘the environment’ in the absence of any environmental (human) right or rights in the Convention. Some theoretical approaches to ‘human rights and the environment’ are examined and the possible formulation of an environmental right or rights, their scope and content are discussed as a preliminary to the examination of the way in which the rights actually stated in the (...)
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  22. Mark Sagoff (2013). What Does Environmental Protection Protect? Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):239-257.score: 140.0
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  23. C. Wolf (1999). Property Rights, Human Needs, and Environmental Protection: A Response to Brock. Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):107-113.score: 140.0
  24. K. Stibral & M. Stella (2006). Konrad Lorenz: From Aesthetics to Environmental Protection. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aestetics; Until 2008: Estetika (Aesthetics) 42 (1-3).score: 140.0
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  25. Michael W. Fox (1991). Prejudice and Progress in Animal and Environmental Protection. Between the Species 7 (1):15.score: 140.0
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  26. Abe Goldman, Jaclyn Hall, Michael Binford & Joel Hartter (2013). Environmental Protection and Affection in East Africa. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):270-272.score: 140.0
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  27. David E. Hill (1981). State-of-the-Art of Soil and Water Conservation Soil and Water Conservation for Production and Environmental Protection Frederick R. Troeh J. Arthur Hobbs Roy L. Donahue. [REVIEW] Bioscience 31 (2):171-171.score: 140.0
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  28. Megan Debranski Kelhart (2008). The Sound of Silence at the Environmental Protection Agency. Bioscience 58 (10):924.score: 140.0
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  29. Holmes Rolston Iii (forthcoming). Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order: Ethics After the Earth Summit. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 140.0
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  30. Sonya Senkowsky (2001). Strengthening Science at the Environmental Protection Agency. Bioscience 51 (9):708.score: 140.0
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  31. U. Simonis (2000). Internationally Tradeable Emission Certificates: Efficiency and Equity in Linking Environmental Protection With Economic Development. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):61-75.score: 140.0
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  32. Julian Aleksandrowicz & Maria Paczyńska (1973). Environmental Medicine and the Philosophy of Environmental Protection. Dialectics and Humanism 1 (1):149-155.score: 140.0
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  33. Carol Bernstein (1984). Induced Mutagenesis Induced Mutagenesis: Molecular Mechanisms and Their Applications for Environmental Protection Christopher W. Lawrence. Bioscience 34 (8):522-522.score: 140.0
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  34. B. Narasimha Charyulu (2007). Vedic Knowledge: Contributions to Maintain Ecological Balance and Environmental Protection. In D. N. Shanbhag, K. B. Archak & Michael (eds.), Science, History, Philosophy, and Literature in Sanskrit Classics: Dr. Sundeep Prakashan. 3.score: 140.0
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  35. Robert Frederick (forthcoming). Individual Rights and Environmental Protection. Annual Society for Business Ethics Conference, San Francisco, Usa.score: 140.0
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  36. Neil Gunningham, Robert A. Kagan & Dorothy Thornton (2004). Social License and Environmental Protection: Why Businesses Go Beyond Compliance, 29 Law & Soc. Inquiry 307:308.score: 140.0
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  37. Guy R. Hodge (1979). Careers, Working with Animals: An Introduction to Occupational Opportunities in Animal Welfare, Conservation, Environmental Protection, and Allied Professions. Acropolis Books.score: 140.0
     
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  38. Iii Holmes Rolston (1995). Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4).score: 140.0
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  39. Mark Lampe, Seth R. Ellis & Cherie K. Drummond (forthcoming). What Companies Are Doing to Meet Environmental Protection Responsibilities: Balancing Legal, Ethical, and Profit Concerns. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society.score: 140.0
     
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  40. Dale Murray (2010). Making Mountains Out of Heaps : Environmental Protection One Stone at a Time. In Stephen E. Schmid (ed.), Climbing - Philosophy for Everyone: Because It's There. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 140.0
     
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  41. Ryszard Ochwat (1997). Address of the Chairman of the Senate Commission for Environmental Protection. Dialogue and Universalism 7 (1-6).score: 140.0
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  42. Victor Olumekun & Emmanuel Ige (2011). Local Disposition to Environmental Protection, Poverty Alleviation and Other Issues in the Sustainable Development Agenda in Ondo State, Nigeria. Human Affairs 21 (3):294-303.score: 140.0
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  43. Allayne Barrilleaux Pizzolatto & Cecil A. Zeringue Ii (1993). Facing Society's Demands for Environmental Protection: Management in Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):441-447.score: 140.0
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  44. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1989). Ecological Theories and Ethical Imperatives: Can Ecology Provide a Scientific Justification for the Ethics of Environmental Protection. In William R. Shea & Beat Sitter-Liver (eds.), Scientists and Their Responsibility. Watson Pub. International. 73--104.score: 140.0
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  45. James B. Stribling (2006). Environmental Protection Using DNA Barcodes or Taxa? Bioscience 56 (11):878-879.score: 140.0
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  46. Matthias Kaiser & Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2002). Consensus Conference on Environmental Values in Radiation Protection: A Report on Building Consensus Among Experts. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):593-602.score: 138.0
    During the fall of 2001 (October 22–25), The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the Agricultural University of Norway arranged a consensus conference on the protection of the environment against ionising radiation. The motive for the conference was the need to study the ethical and philosophical basis for protection of nature in its own right. The conference was funded by Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS), in cooperation with the International Union of Radioecology (IUR). The National Committee for (...)
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  47. John M. Bartholow, Aaron J. Douglas & Jonathan G. Taylor (1995). Balancing Hydropower and Environmental Values: The Resource Management Implications of the US Electric Consumers Protection Act and the AWARE™ Software. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 4 (3):257 - 270.score: 132.0
    This paper reviews the AWARE™ software distributed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program is designed to facilitate the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license renewal process for US hydropower installations. The discussion reviews the regulatory, legal, and social contexts that give rise to the creation and distribution of AWARE™. The principal legal impetus for AWARE™ is the Electric Consumer Protection Act (ECPA) of 1986 that directs FERC to give equal consideration to power and non-power resources during (...)
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  48. S. Bratton (1999). Luc Ferry's Critique of Deep Ecology, Nazi Nature Protection Laws, and Environmental Anti-Semitism. Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):3-22.score: 126.0
    Neo-Humanist Luc Ferry (1995) has compared deep ecology's declarations of intrinsic value in nature to the Third Reich's nature protection laws, which prohibit maltreatment of animals having "worth in themselves." Ferry's questionable approach fails to document the relationship between Nazi environmentalism and Nazi racism. German high art and mass media historically presented nature as dualistic, and portrayed Untermenschen as unnatural or inorganic. Nazi propaganda excluded Jews from nature, and identified traditional Jews as cruel to animals. Ferry's idealization of Humanism (...)
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  49. Cathy Byrne (2006). Would A Buddhist Freeze A Cane Toad?An Exploration Of The Modern Phenomenon Of Environmental Buddhism And The Ethics Related To The Doctrine Of Ahimsa (Non-Harming). Contemporary Buddhism 7 (2):117-127.score: 126.0
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