Search results for 'Environmental protection Citizen participation' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Mikko Rask, Richard Worthington & Minna Lammi (eds.) (2010). Citizen Participation in Global Environmental Governance. Earthscan.score: 187.5
  2. Mark J. Smith (2008). Environment and Citizenship: Integrating Justice, Responsibility and Civic Engagement. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.score: 108.5
    From environmental justice to environmental citizenship -- Citizens, citizenship and citizenization -- Rethinking environment and citizenship : ecological citizenship as a politics of obligation and virtues -- Environmental governance, social movements and citizenship in a global -- Context -- Corporate responsibility and environmental sustainability -- Environmental borderlands -- Insiders and outsiders in environmental mobilizations in Southeast Asia -- Citizenship generation, NGO campaigns and community-based research -- Acting and changing through lived experience : the new (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alex Latta & Hannah Wittman (eds.) (2012). Environment and Citizenship in Latin America: Natures, Subjects and Struggles. Berghahn Books.score: 105.0
    This volume is the result of a collaborative endeavor to advance debates on environmental citizenship, while simultaneously and systematically addressing broader theoretical and methodological questions related to the particularities of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Andrew Dobson (2003). Citizenship and the Environment. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    This is the first book-length treatment of the relationship between citizenship and the environment. Andrew Dobson argues that ecological citizenship cannot be fully articulated in terms of the two great traditions of citizenship - liberal and civic republican - with which we have been bequeathed. He develops an original theory of citizenship, which he calls 'post-cosmopolitan', and argues that ecological citizenship is an example and an inflection of it. Ecological citizenship focuses on duties as well as rights, and these duties (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John M. Marzluff (2013). Citizen Science: Public Participation in Environmental Research. Bioscience 63 (2):139-140.score: 81.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jenny Steele (2001). Participation and Deliberation in Environmental Law: Exploring a Problem‐Solving Approach. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):415-442.score: 63.0
    This article explores some important recent instances of increased participation in environmental law, focusing on those developments which seek close citizen involvement in decision‐making. It is argued that these developments are best explained in terms of a new understanding of the public's potential contribution to environmental decisions. In particular, there are signs that participation is regarded as likely to lead to better decision‐making. Borrowing from theories of deliberative democracy, the article explores the idea that (...) deliberation may contribute to enhanced problem‐solving, especially on questions of environmental risk. Since deliberative theory has generally been concerned with legitimacy rather than problem‐solving, the article further explores the implications of emphasizing problem‐solving as the basis for participation. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sonia Brondi, Mauro Sarrica & Alessio Nencini (2012). Youth Participation in Environmental Issues: A Study with Italian Adolescents. Human Affairs 22 (3):390-404.score: 60.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Martin H. Lenihan & Kathryn J. Brasier (2009). Scaling Down the European Model of Agriculture: The Case of the Rural Environmental Protection Scheme in Ireland. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):365-378.score: 60.0
    Recent reforms of the Common Agricultural Policy have led to much discussion of the European multifunctional model of agriculture in both policy and academic circles. Accordingly, European agriculture provides numerous social and environmental benefits and as a result should be supported through a system of payments which directly target those benefits. The agri-environmental measures specified under pillar II of the Common Agricultural Policy are supposed to exemplify the multifunctional model of agriculture, and the macro-level debates surrounding the introduction (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Peter C. Yeager (1992). The Politics of Efficiencies, the Efficiencies of Politics: States Vs. Markets in Environmental Protection. Critical Review 6 (2-3):231-253.score: 59.0
    In The Political Limits of Environmental Regulation: Tracking the Unicorn, Bruce Yandle identifies some of the key weaknesses of federal environmental regulation, including its regressive effects, its tendency to better serve selected political interests than the cause of environmental protection, and the EPA's failure to follow sensible priorities. Additional problems may also be cited, including the tendency to exclude citizens? voices from deliberations regarding the degree of pollution control. But Yandle's conclusion regarding the likely superiority of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Napoleon M. Mabaquiao (2002). Corporations and the Cause of Environmental Protection. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 12 (1):11-15.score: 54.0
    This essay deals with the following issues: (1) whether corporations can have moral responsibilities; (2) whether, granting that corporations can have moral responsibilities, nature can be an object of these responsibilities; and (3) what moral theory can appropriately justify why corporations ought to contribute to the cause of environmental protection. It is here argued that while it can be shown that corporations can have moral responsibilities, such responsibilities are limited towards humans and other corporations. The main reason is (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jürgen S. Poesche (1996). Punishment in Environmental Protection. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (10):1071 - 1081.score: 54.0
    The fundamental character of a punishment is the subject of this paper. Based on the assumed function of a punishment (deterrent), a punishment has to be perceived and experienced to be an adverse result by the punished and the public. The first factor in particular means that the courts have to have flexibility to sentence a person to such a punishment that is experienced as such. The legal question becomes how this customization of a punishment is acceptable from an equality (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Albert Weale (1992). Nature Versus the State? Markets, States, and Environmental Protection. Critical Review 6 (2-3):153-170.score: 54.0
    Is it possible to reconcile a classical liberal approach to economics with a concern for the environment? The contributors to Economics and the Environment: A Reconciliation contend that it is. But they fail to distinguish properly between classical liberalism and a widespread orthodoxy in environmental policy communities in Europe and North America to the effect that economic instruments for environmental policy need more serious attention than they have hitherto received. Once this orthodoxy is distinguished from classical liberalism, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ned Hettinger (2005). Allen Carlson's Environmental Aesthetics and the Protection of the Environment. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):57-76.score: 52.5
    Evaluation of the contribution that Allen Carlson’s environmental aesthetics can make to environmental protection shows that Carlson’s positive aesthetics, his focus on the functionality of human environments for their proper aesthetic appreciation, and his integration of ethical concern with aesthetic appreciation all provide fruitful, though not unproblematic, avenues for an aesthetic defense of theenvironment.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Leonard J. Waks (1996). Environmental Claims and Citizen Rights. Environmental Ethics 18 (2):133-148.score: 51.0
    I propose a model for the development of citizen rights based on the advance of political and social rights and apply it to contemporary claims regarding environmental rights. In terms of this “claims and attenuations” model, I sketch the roles of environmental philosophers and activists, the media and public opinion, and political insiders in the development of positive rights. I then predict a weakeningof environmental claims and a marginalization of environmental philosophies as environmental claims (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anna Davies (2001). What Silence Knows – Planning, Public Participation and Environmental Values. Environmental Values 10 (1):77 - 102.score: 51.0
    While fraught with ambiguities, support for greater public participation in environmental policy making is experiencing a renaissance amongst sections of government and academia, particularly within the field of land-use planning. There is concern within this cohort that the planning system silences public voices through its current mechanisms for community involvement. Proponents of participation often presuppose that more public participation will produce both 'better' decisions and environmental benefits, but to date research has focused on the front-end, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555-571.score: 49.5
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Yvonne M. Scherrer (2009). Environmental Conservation NGOs and the Concept of Sustainable Development: A Research Into the Value Systems of Greenpeace International, WWF International and IUCN International. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):555 - 571.score: 49.5
    On the background of the widely known and controversially discussed concept of sustainable development and the ever increasing influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on social, environmental and economic issues, this article focuses on how NGOs, specialised in environmental protection and conservation issues, reacted to the holistic societal concept of sustainable development which aims at finding solutions not only to environmental, but also to social and economic issues. For this purpose, the article investigates whether and to what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Eduardas Monkevicius (2010). Environmental Legal Problems in the Context of Globalization. Jurisprudence 119 (1):197-210.score: 49.5
    The author of the article describes globalization processes as inevitable historic and objective phenomena, the driving force of society’s development and progress. It is emphasized that these processes result in harmful effects of global character on the environment and society. In the opinion of the author, one of the most important negative effects of globalization is the increase in environmental pollution which in turn results in the change of climate, extreme ecological situations, and threats to the natural environment and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Coutellec Léo & Bernard Pintureau (2013). Crop Protection Between Sciences, Ethics and Societies: From Quick-Fix Ideal to Multiple Partial Solutions. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):207-230.score: 48.0
    Crop protection has a very long history during which new methods have been developed whilst, at the same time, the older ones have retained their usefulness in certain conditions. The diversity of agricultural land and production has meant that it was futile to search for a unique and definitive approach or technical solution and, instead, the central concept has always been one of integration, during all the period of pre-Green Revolution and again today within what we call a sustainable (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jennifer Summerville & Barbara Adkins (2007). Enrolling the Citizen in Sustainability: Membership Categorization, Morality and Civic Participation. [REVIEW] Human Studies 30 (4):429 - 446.score: 48.0
    This article examines the common-sense and methodical ways in which “the citizen” is produced and enrolled as an active participant in “sustainable” regional planning. Using Membership Categorization Analysis, we explicate how the categorization procedures in the Foreword of a draft regional planning policy interactionally produce the identity of “the citizen” and “civic values and obligations” in relation to geographic place and institutional categories. Furthermore, we show how positioning practices establish a relationship between authors (government) and readers (citizens) where (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare (forthcoming). Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-15.score: 48.0
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Margaret DeMerieux (2001). Deriving Environmental Rights From the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):521-561.score: 48.0
    This article examines the way in which the organs of the European Human Rights Convention have dealt with cases involving ‘the environment’ in the absence of any environmental (human) right or rights in the Convention. Some theoretical approaches to ‘human rights and the environment’ are examined and the possible formulation of an environmental right or rights, their scope and content are discussed as a preliminary to the examination of the way in which the rights actually stated in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Werner Heermann, Rasa Ragulskytė-Markovienė & Indrė Žvaigždinienė (2013). Interim Measures in Administrative Proceedings: Specifics of Environmental Cases. Jurisprudence 20 (1):207-233.score: 48.0
    Interim measures are procedural means that allow persons or States to have their rights preserved when a case is pending. Application of these measures especially in environmental cases is very important. In many of these cases (e.g. cases dealing with territorial planning, IPPC permits, environmental impact assessment, etc.) the claims deal with the protection of environment or its components (water, air, soil, etc.) as well as with the protection of public interest. Legal regulation of application of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Allayne Barrilleaux Pizzolatto & Cecil A. Zeringue (1993). Facing Society's Demands for Environmental Protection: Management in Practice. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):441 - 447.score: 46.5
    Although managers must stay abreast of all socictal concerns in developing organizational objectives, protecting the environment seems to be a major issue for consumers in the 1990s. This increased environmental concern leaves managers no choice but to go beyond mere social obligation when it comes to protecting the environment. Society is demanding social responsiveness at a minimum, and the call for social responsibility seems to be getting louder and clearer. This paper reviews the response business has made to this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Allayne Barrilleaux Pizzolatto & I. I. Zeringue (1993). Facing Society's Demands for Environmental Protection: Management in Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):441-447.score: 46.5
    Although managers must stay abreast of all socictal concerns in developing organizational objectives, protecting the environment seems to be a major issue for consumers in the 1990s. This increased environmental concern leaves managers no choice but to go beyond mere social obligation when it comes to protecting the environment. Society is demanding social responsiveness at a minimum, and the call for social responsibility seems to be getting louder and clearer. This paper reviews the response business has made to this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. OUP USA.score: 46.5
    In the United States alone, industrial and agricultural toxins account for about 60,000 avoidable cancer deaths annually. Pollution-related health costs to Americans are similarly staggering: $13 billion a year from asthma, $351 billion from cardiovascular disease, and $240 billion from occupational disease and injury. Most troubling, children, the poor, and minorities bear the brunt of these health tragedies. Why, asks Kristin Shrader-Frechette, has the government failed to protect us, and what can we do about it? In this book, at once (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Matthias Kaiser & Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2002). Consensus Conference on Environmental Values in Radiation Protection: A Report on Building Consensus Among Experts. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):593-602.score: 45.0
    During the fall of 2001 (October 22–25), The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the Agricultural University of Norway arranged a consensus conference on the protection of the environment against ionising radiation. The motive for the conference was the need to study the ethical and philosophical basis for protection of nature in its own right. The conference was funded by Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS), in cooperation with the International Union of Radioecology (IUR). The National Committee for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jeffrey Moriarty (2010). Participation in the Workplace: Are Employees Special? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):373 - 384.score: 45.0
    Many arguments have been advanced in favor of employee participation in firm decision-making. Two of the most influential are the "interest protection argument" and the "autonomy argument." I argue that the case for granting participation rights to some other stakeholders, such as suppliers and community members, is at least as strong, according to the reasons given in these arguments, as the case for granting them to certain employees. I then consider how proponents of these arguments might modify (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Emmanuel K. Yiridoe (2000). Risk of Public Disclosure in Environmental Farm Plan Programs: Characteristics and Mitigating Legal and Policy Strategies. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):101-120.score: 45.0
    Although various studies have shown thatfarmers believe there is the need for a producer-ledinitiative to address the environmental problems fromagriculture, farmers in several Canadian provinceshave been reluctant to widely participate inEnvironmental Farm Plan (EFP) programs. Few studieshave examined the key issues associated with adoptingEFP programs based on farmers', as opposed to policymakers', perspectives on why producers are reluctantto participate in the program. A study adapting VanRaaij's (1981) conceptual model of the decision-makingenvironment of the firm, and prospect theory on valuefunctions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl (2006). The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.score: 43.5
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption (and eating less meat) could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Holmes Rolston (1995). Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):735-752.score: 43.5
    The UNCED Earth Summit established two new principles of international justice: an equitable international order and protection of the environment. UNCED was a significant symbol, a morality play about environment and economics. Wealth is asymmetrically distributed; approximately one-fifth of the world (the G-7 nations) produces and consumes four-fifths of goods and services; four-fifths (the G-77 nations) get one-fifth. This distribution can be interpreted as both an earnings differential and as exploitation. Responses may require justice or charity, producing and sharing. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John M. Bartholow, Aaron J. Douglas & Jonathan G. Taylor (1995). Balancing Hydropower and Environmental Values: The Resource Management Implications of the US Electric Consumers Protection Act and the AWARE™ Software. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 4 (3):257 - 270.score: 42.0
    This paper reviews the AWARE™ software distributed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program is designed to facilitate the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license renewal process for US hydropower installations. The discussion reviews the regulatory, legal, and social contexts that give rise to the creation and distribution of AWARE™. The principal legal impetus for AWARE™ is the Electric Consumer Protection Act (ECPA) of 1986 that directs FERC to give equal consideration to power and non-power resources during (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Albert W. Dzur (2010). The Myth of Penal Populism: Democracy, Citizen Participation, and American Hyperincarceration. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4):354-379.score: 40.5
    But the action of the common people is always either too remiss or too violent. Sometimes with a hundred thousand arms they overturn all before them; and sometimes with a hundred thousand feet they creep like insects.Late modernity, when things and people are so fluid and fast until they stop, is a time of unsettled democratic identities. A well-known image of Magritte's, entitled La folie des grandeurs, or Megalomania, depicts a female torso in three stacked hollow segments of inclining scale, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. C. Wolf (1999). Property Rights, Human Needs, and Environmental Protection: A Response to Brock. Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):107-113.score: 40.5
  35. Rita Vorst (1998). Organisational Development Issues and the Implementation of the Clean Technology Paradigm in Industry. AI and Society 12 (1-2):48-54.score: 40.5
    Environmental protection activities in industry have rapidly increased in number over the last years. Additionally, surveys of environmental activities have identified a change in the kind or in the approaches used to environmental problem solving. A new paradigm ‘Clean Technology’ has been developed which gradually seems to replace the ‘Clean-up Technology’ paradigm and the older ‘Dilute and Disperse’ paradigm. The new ‘Clean Technology’ paradigm brings with it not only a new way of looking at environmental (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. U. Simonis (2000). Internationally Tradeable Emission Certificates: Efficiency and Equity in Linking Environmental Protection With Economic Development. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):61-75.score: 40.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Julian Aleksandrowicz & Maria Paczyńska (1973). Environmental Medicine and the Philosophy of Environmental Protection. Dialectics and Humanism 1 (1):149-155.score: 40.5
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Carol Bernstein (1984). Induced Mutagenesis Induced Mutagenesis: Molecular Mechanisms and Their Applications for Environmental Protection Christopher W. Lawrence. Bioscience 34 (8):522-522.score: 40.5
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. B. Narasimha Charyulu (2007). Vedic Knowledge: Contributions to Maintain Ecological Balance and Environmental Protection. In D. N. Shanbhag, K. B. Archak & Michael (eds.), Science, History, Philosophy, and Literature in Sanskrit Classics: Dr. Sundeep Prakashan. 3.score: 40.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Albert W. Dzur (2008). Democratic Professionalism: Citizen Participation and the Reconstruction of Professional Ethics, Identity, and Practice. Penn State University Press.score: 40.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Michael W. Fox (1991). Prejudice and Progress in Animal and Environmental Protection. Between the Species 7 (1):15.score: 40.5
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Robert Frederick (forthcoming). Individual Rights and Environmental Protection. Annual Society for Business Ethics Conference, San Francisco, Usa.score: 40.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Abe Goldman, Jaclyn Hall, Michael Binford & Joel Hartter (2013). Environmental Protection and Affection in East Africa. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):270-272.score: 40.5
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Neil Gunningham, Robert A. Kagan & Dorothy Thornton (2004). Social License and Environmental Protection: Why Businesses Go Beyond Compliance, 29 Law & Soc. Inquiry 307:308.score: 40.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Judith J. Hernández de Velazco-Venezuela (2013). Perspectiva Conceptual Normativa de la Participación Ciudadana y Democracia En Venezuela//A Normative Conceptual Perspective of Citizen Participation and Democracy in Venezuela. Telos 15 (1):64-76.score: 40.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David E. Hill (1981). State-of-the-Art of Soil and Water Conservation Soil and Water Conservation for Production and Environmental Protection Frederick R. Troeh J. Arthur Hobbs Roy L. Donahue. [REVIEW] Bioscience 31 (2):171-171.score: 40.5
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Guy R. Hodge (1979). Careers, Working with Animals: An Introduction to Occupational Opportunities in Animal Welfare, Conservation, Environmental Protection, and Allied Professions. Acropolis Books.score: 40.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Iii Holmes Rolston (1995). Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4).score: 40.5
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sheila Jasanoff (2003). Technologies of Humility: Citizen Participation in Governing Science. Minerva 41 (3):223--244.score: 40.5
    Building on recent theories ofscience in society, such as that provided bythe `Mode 2' framework, this paper argues thatgovernments should reconsider existingrelations among decision-makers, experts, andcitizens in the management of technology.Policy-makers need a set of `technologies ofhumility' for systematically assessing theunknown and the uncertain. Appropriate focalpoints for such modest assessments are framing,vulnerability, distribution, and learning.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000