Search results for 'Environmental responsibility' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mao He & Juan Chen (2009). Sustainable Development and Corporate Environmental Responsibility: Evidence From Chinese Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):323-339.score: 246.0
    China is currently experiencing rapid economic growth. The price of this, however, is environment pollution. Many Chinese corporations are lacking in corporate environmental responsibility (CER). Therefore, this study employs data from Chinese and multinational corporations to identify why Chinese corporations seldom engage in CER by investigating their motivations and stakeholders. The results show that the most important reason why Chinese corporations do not engage in CER is the fact that their competitive strategy of cost cutting makes them limited (...)
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  2. Yongtae Kim & Meir Statman (2012). Do Corporations Invest Enough in Environmental Responsibility? Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):115-129.score: 240.0
    Proponents of corporate environmental responsibility argue that corporations shortchange shareholders by investing too little in environmental responsibility. They claim that corporations can improve their financial performance by increasing their investment in environmental responsibility. Opponents of corporate social responsibility argue that corporations shortchange shareholders by investing too much in environmental responsibility. They claim that corporations can improve their financial performance by reducing their investment in environmental responsibility. Yet, others claim that (...)
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  3. X. H. Meng, S. X. Zeng, C. M. Tam & X. D. Xu (2013). Whether Top Executives' Turnover Influences Environmental Responsibility: From the Perspective of Environmental Information Disclosure. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):341-353.score: 240.0
    We have empirically examined the relationship between top executives’ turnover and the corporate environmental responsibility by identifying the influence of ten specific turnover reasons resulting in the chairman’s departure and two important types of chairman’s succession. Using a sample of 782 manufacturing listed companies across 3 years in China, we find that the corporate environmental responsibility is negatively associated with the involuntary and negative turnover (i.e., dismissal, health and death, and forced resignation) and positively associated with (...)
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  4. Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Quan Zeng & Yingjie Du (2013). Corporate Environmental Responsibility in Polluting Industries: Does Religion Matter? Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.score: 240.0
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms in polluting industries for the period of 2008–2010, we empirically investigate whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, affects corporate environmental responsibility (CER). In this study, we measure Buddhist variables as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses. In addition, we hand-collect corporate environmental disclosure scores based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting guidelines. Using hand-collected Buddhism data and corporate (...)
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  5. Li Cai & Chaohua He (2013). Corporate Environmental Responsibility and Equity Prices. Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.score: 240.0
    This paper uses an innovative way to screen stocks and analyzes the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and long-run stock returns. By our definition, an environmentally responsible (green) company gives no environmental concern and shows environmental strength(s). Using 20 years’ data of 1992–2011, we find evidence that environmentally responsible company outperforms, in the 4th to 7th year after the screening year. An equal-weighted environmentally responsible portfolio earned an annual four-factor alpha of 4.06 % in the 4th (...)
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  6. Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist (2009). Moral Responsibility for Environmental Problems—Individual or Institutional? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):109-124.score: 198.0
    The actions performed by individuals, as consumers and citizens, have aggregate negative consequences for the environment. The question asked in this paper is to what extent it is reasonable to hold individuals and institutions responsible for environmental problems. A distinction is made between backward-looking and forward-looking responsibility. Previously, individuals were not seen as being responsible for environmental problems, but an idea that is now sometimes implicitly or explicitly embraced in the public debate on environmental problems is (...)
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  7. Haylee Uecker-Mercado & Matthew Walker (2012). The Value of Environmental Social Responsibility to Facility Managers: Revealing the Perceptions and Motives for Adopting ESR. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):269-284.score: 198.0
    This study is grounded in the debate surrounding the perceived value of environmental social responsibility (ESR). Applying the Managerial Theory of the Firm, in-depth interviews were conducted to identify managerial motives, perceptions, and perceived value of ESR. Using sport and public assembly facilities as the research context, environmentally responsible information was obtained from facility managers who were members of the International Association of Venue Managers. In total, 15 one-hour, interviews with key facility personnel demonstrate that (1) internal stakeholder (...)
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  8. Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post (2012). Measurement Issues in Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR): Toward a Transparent, Reliable, and Construct Valid Instrument. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):307-319.score: 192.0
    One of the major roadblocks in conducting Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR) research is operationalization of the construct. Existing ECSR measurement tools either require primary data gathering or special subscriptions to proprietary databases that have limited replicability. We address this deficiency by developing a transparent ECSR measure, with an explicit coding scheme, that strictly relies on publicly available data. Our ECSR measure tests favorably for internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, as well as convergent and discriminant validity.
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  9. Haiying Lin (2012). Cross-Sector Alliances for Corporate Social Responsibility Partner Heterogeneity Moderates Environmental Strategy Outcomes. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):219-229.score: 192.0
    This article provides a new mechanism in understanding how partner heterogeneity moderates an alliance's ability to advance corporate social responsibility goals. I identified the antecedents for firms to select a more diverse set of partners and explored whether more diverse alliances (especially cross-sector alliances) may facilitate partners to achieve more proactive environmental outcomes. I employ 146 environmental alliances formed in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009 to test the assertions. Results suggest that firms with innovative orientation and (...)
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  10. Georges Enderle (1997). In Search of a Common Ethical Ground: Corporate Environmental Responsibility From the Perspective of Christian Environmental Stewardship. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):173-181.score: 180.0
    In recent years, corporate environmental policies have become urgently needed, demanded by influential environmentalist groups and launched by an increasing number of companies. Those demands and efforts, however, often lack an ethical underpinning. This paper deals with some basic ethical issues and outlines three perspectives for further investigation: (1) How can we take into account ethical pluralism that characterizes most contemporary societies?; (2) What is the content of environmental ethics viewed from a Christian perspective, taken as an example (...)
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  11. A. Salama, K. Anderson & J. S. Toms (2011). Does Community and Environmental Responsibility Affect Firm Risk? Evidence From UK Panel Data 1994–2006. Business Ethics 20 (2):192-204.score: 180.0
    The question of how an individual firm's social and environmental performance impacts its firm risk has not been examined in any empirical UK research. Does a company that strives to attain good environmental performance decrease its market risk or is environmental performance just a disadvantageous cost that increases such risk levels for these firms? Answers to this question have important implications for the management of companies and the investment decisions of individuals and institutions. The purpose of this (...)
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  12. Ty Raterman (2012). Bearing the Weight of the World: On the Extent of an Individual's Environmental Responsibility. Environmental Values 21 (4):417 - 436.score: 180.0
    To what extent is any individual morally obligated to live environmentally sustainably? In answering this, I reject views I see as constituting two extremes. On one, it depends entirely on whether there exists a collective agreement; and if no such agreement exists, no one is obligated to reduce her/his consumption or pollution unilaterally. On the other, the lack of a collective agreement is morally irrelevant, and regardless of what others are doing, each person is obligated to limit her/his pollution and (...)
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  13. Joe DesJardins (1998). Corporate Environmental Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (8):825 - 838.score: 174.0
    This paper offers directions for the continuing dialogue between business ethicists and environmental philosophers. I argue that a theory of corporate social responsibility must be consistent with, if not derived from, a model of sustainable economics rather than the prevailing neoclassical model of market economics. I use environmental examples to critique both classical and neoclassical models of corporate social responsibility and sketch the alternative model of sustainable development. After describing some implications of this model at the (...)
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  14. Peihua Sheng, Linda Chang & Warren A. French (1994). Business's Environmental Responsibility in Taiwan — Moral, Legal or Negotiated. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):887 - 897.score: 174.0
    This study explores both the negotiating styles and moral reasoning processes of business people and governmental officials in Taiwan, so as to provide a footing for outsiders when negotiating with Taiwanese over environmental concerns. Findings imply that Taiwanese business people and governmental officials can and will reason both at the conventional level and at the postconventional level of moral judgment. But, results of this study also indicate that Taiwanese negotiating styles do not necessarily match their levels of moral reasoning. (...)
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  15. Irene Goll & Abdul A. Rasheed (2004). The Moderating Effect of Environmental Munificence and Dynamism on the Relationship Between Discretionary Social Responsibility and Firm Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):41-54.score: 156.0
    This study examines the relationships between a company''s emphasis on discretionary social responsibility, environment, and firm performance. It tests the proposition that environmental munificence and dynamism moderate the relationship between discretionary social responsibility and financial performance. Social responsibility was measured with a three-item scale in a sample of 62 firms using a questionnaire. Environmental munificence and dynamism were measured using archival sources as was financial performance (return on assets and return on sales). The results of (...)
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  16. Richard Blundel, Adrian Monaghan & Christine Thomas (2013). SMEs and Environmental Responsibility: A Policy Perspective. Business Ethics 22 (3):246-262.score: 156.0
    Environmental policies to promote environmentally sustainable economic activity have often concentrated on larger firms. However, increasing attention is being paid to the role of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and entrepreneurial actors. In this paper, we examine how policy tools are being used to improve the environmental performance of SMEs and to redirect entrepreneurial energies in more environmentally benign directions. The empirical section adopts a case-based comparative method to examine four instances of policymaking, drawn from different countries and (...)
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  17. Stelios C. Zyglidopoulos (2002). The Social and Environmental Responsibilities of Multinationals: Evidence From the Brent Spar Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):141 - 151.score: 154.0
    This paper argues that multinational corporations face levels of environmental and social responsibility higher than their national counterparts. Drawing on the literatures of stakeholder salience, corporate reputation management, and evidence from the confrontation between Shell and Greenpeace over the Brent Spar, in 1995, two mechanisms – international reputation side effects, and foreign stakeholder salience – are identified and their contribution in creating an environment more restrictive, in terms of environmental and social responsibility, is elaborated on. The (...)
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  18. Robin Attfield (1990). Ethics and Environmental Responsibility. Philosophical Books 31 (3):172-173.score: 150.0
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  19. Jeffery Smith (2005). Market Failures, Political Solutions and Corporate Environmental Responsibility. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):131-139.score: 150.0
  20. J. Angelo Corlett (1996). Corporate Responsibility for Environmental Damage. Environmental Ethics 18 (2):195-207.score: 150.0
    I set forth and defend an analysis of corporate moral responsibility (retrospective moral liability), which, I argue, ought to serve as the foundation for corporate legal responsibility, punishment, and compensation for environmental damage caused by corporations.
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  21. Ronald M. Green (1977). Intergenerational Distributive Justice and Environmental Responsibility. Bioscience 27 (4):260-265.score: 150.0
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  22. Joseph DesJardins (2002). Environmental Responsibility. In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell. 244--264.score: 150.0
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  23. Georges Enderle (1997). In Search of a Common Ethical Ground: Corporate Environmental Responsibility a From the Perspective of Christian. Journal of Business Ethics 16:173-181.score: 150.0
     
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  24. S. Shah (2011). Social and Environmental Responsibility: Case Study of Hindustan Unilever Ltd. Journal of Human Values 17 (1):23-42.score: 150.0
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  25. Tuomo Takala (1996). From Social Responsibility to Environmental Responsibility-Changes in the Finnish Business Discourse From 1970 to 1995. Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies 1 (1).score: 150.0
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  26. Richard H. Guerrette (1986). Environmental Integrity and Corporate Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 5 (5):409 - 415.score: 144.0
    Environmental disasters like Bhopal have a way of calling attention to environmental and corporate ethical issues. This paper discusses these issues in terms of a livable environment as an inalienable right and of corporate responsibility as an philosophical and social psychological disposition that enables corporations to respect that right. The corporate conscience is compared to the individual conscience and analyzed according to the moral development theories of Lawrence Kohlberg. Its moral development is recognized as problematic from the (...)
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  27. D. A. Vazquez-Brust, C. Liston-Heyes, J. A. Plaza-Úbeda & J. Burgos-Jiménez (2010). Stakeholders Pressures and Strategic Prioritisation: An Empirical Analysis of Environmental Responses in Argentinean Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):171 - 192.score: 142.0
    This article focusses on corporate attitudes to stakeholder environmental pressures in Argentina. It uses a cross section survey of 505 CEOs of Argentinean firms to gather information on environmental attitudes and a stakeholder theory framework to design and interpret the statistical analyses. It is underpinned by theoretical and empirical findings in the literature on stakeholder management, targeting in particular studies that deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Latin America. Its general aim is to gain a deeper (...)
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  28. Daejoong Kim & Yoonjae Nam (2012). Corporate Relations with Environmental Organizations Represented by Hyperlinks on the Fortune Global 500 Companies' Websites. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):475-487.score: 120.0
    This study investigates corporate relationships with environmental organizations by examining hyperlinks in the corporate environmental responsibility (CER) sections of the Fortune 2008 Global 500 corporate websites. It is assumed that hyperlinked organizations either represent their current inter-organizational relationship or create symbolic relationships among organizations. Results show that Asian companies have fewer hyperlink relations with other organizations compared with those in North America and Western Europe. Network analysis also confirms that U.S. companies are explicitly connected with stakeholders for (...)
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  29. D. B. Resnik (2007). Responsibility for Health: Personal, Social, and Environmental. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):444-445.score: 120.0
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  30. Alan B. Carter (1990). Book Review:Environmental Accidents: Personal Injury and Public Responsibility. Richard H. Gaskins. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (4):901-.score: 120.0
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  31. Min‐Dong Paul Lee (2009). Does Ownership Form Matter for Corporate Social Responsibility? A Longitudinal Comparison of Environmental Performance Between Public, Private, and Joint‐Venture Firms. Business and Society Review 114 (4):435-456.score: 120.0
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  32. Arpana Dhar (2003). Ethical Responsibility Towards Environmental Degradation. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (4).score: 120.0
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  33. Richard S. Miller (1968). Responsibility of Environmental Scientists and Their Professional Societies. Bioscience 18 (5):384-387.score: 120.0
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  34. Bellarmine Nneji (2010). Eco-Responsibility: The Cogency for Environmental Ethics in Africa. Essays in Philosophy 11 (1):5.score: 120.0
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  35. Mark J. Smith (2008). Environment and Citizenship: Integrating Justice, Responsibility and Civic Engagement. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.score: 114.0
    From environmental justice to environmental citizenship -- Citizens, citizenship and citizenization -- Rethinking environment and citizenship : ecological citizenship as a politics of obligation and virtues -- Environmental governance, social movements and citizenship in a global -- Context -- Corporate responsibility and environmental sustainability -- Environmental borderlands -- Insiders and outsiders in environmental mobilizations in Southeast Asia -- Citizenship generation, NGO campaigns and community-based research -- Acting and changing through lived experience : the (...)
     
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  36. Judith Kimerling (2001). Corporate Ethics in the Era of Globalization: The Promise and Peril of International Environmental Standards. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (4):425-455.score: 108.0
    The growing assumption thattransnational corporations (TNCs) will apply``best practice'''' and ``international standards''''in their operations in developing countries hasseldom been checked against close observationof corporate behavior. In this article, Ipresent a case study, based on field research,of one voluntary initiative to useinternational standards and best practice forenvironmental protection in the AmazonRainforest, by a US-based oil company,Occidental Petroleum (Oxy) in Ecuador. The moststriking finding is that the company refuses todisclose the precise standards that apply toits operations. This, and the refusal todisclose other (...)
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  37. Risako Morimoto, John Ash & Chris Hope (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility Audit: From Theory to Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):315 - 325.score: 102.0
    This research examines the possibility of developing a new corporate social responsibility (CSR) auditing system based on the analysis of current CSR literature and interviews conducted with a number of interested and knowledgeable stakeholders. This work attempts to create a framework for social responsibility auditing compatible with an existing commercially successful environmental audit system. The project is unusual in that it tackles the complex issue of CSR auditing with a scientific approach using Grounded Theory. On the evidence (...)
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  38. Jouni Korhonen (2003). On the Ethics of Corporate Social Responsibility – Considering the Paradigm of Industrial Metabolism. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):301-315.score: 102.0
    This paper attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest a conceptual methodology with which ethics of corporate environmental management tools can be considered. The method includes two stages that are required for a shift away from the current dominant unsustainable paradigm and toward a more sustainable paradigm. The first stage is paradigmatic, metaphoric and normative. The second stage is a practical stage, (...)
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  39. Martin Mueller, Virginia Gomes dos Santos & Stefan Seuring (2009). The Contribution of Environmental and Social Standards Towards Ensuring Legitimacy in Supply Chain Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):509 - 523.score: 102.0
    Increasingly, companies implement social and environmental standards as instruments towards corporate social responsibility (CSR) in supply chains. This is based on the assumption that such standards increase legitimacy among stakeholders. Yet, a wide variety of standards with different requirement levels exist and companies might tend to introduce the ones with low exigencies, using them as a legitimacy front. This strategy jeopardizes the reputation of social and environmental standards among stakeholders and their long-term trust in these instruments of (...)
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  40. Michael Bell (2011). An Invitation to Environmental Sociology. Pine Forge Press.score: 96.0
    Machine generated contents note: Chapter 1. Environmental Problems and Society Part I: The Material Chapter 2. Consumption and Materialism Chapter 3. Money and Machines Chapter 4. Population and Development Chapter 5. Body and Health Part II: The Ideal Chapter 6. The Ideology of Environmental Domination Chapter 7. The Ideology of Environmental Concern Chapter 8. The Human Nature of Nature Chapter 9. The Rationality of Risk Part III: The Practical Chapter 10. Mobilizing the Ecological Society Chapter 11. Governing (...)
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  41. Mick Smith (2006). Environmental Risks and Ethical Responsibilities: Arendt, Beck, and the Politics of Acting Into Nature. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):227-246.score: 96.0
    The question of environmental responsibility is addressed through comparisons between Hannah Arendt’s and Ulrich Beck’s accounts of the emergent and globally threatening risks associated with acting into nature. Both theorists have been extraordinarily influential in their respective fields but their insights, pointing toward the politicization of nature through human intervention, are rarely brought into conjunction. Important differences stem from Beck’s treatment of risks as systemic and unavoidable side effects of late modernity. Arendt, however, retains a more restrictive anthropogenic (...)
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  42. Dilek Cetindamar (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Environmentally Responsible Behavior: The Case of the United Nations Global Compact. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):163 - 176.score: 96.0
    The aim of this paper is to shed some light on understanding why companies adopt environmentally responsible behavior and what impact this adoption has on their performance. This is an empirical study that focuses on the United Nations (UN) Global Compact (GC) initiative as a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) mechanism. A survey was conducted among GC participants, of which 29 responded. The survey relies on the anticipated and actual benefits noted by the participants in the GC. The results, while (...)
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  43. Kevin Christopher Elliott (2010). Is a Little Pollution Good for You?: Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    Introduction : societal values and environmental research -- The Hormesis case -- An argument for societal values in policy-relevant research -- Lesson #1 : safeguarding science -- Lesson #2 : diagnosing deliberation -- Lesson #3 : ethics for experts -- The MCS and ED cases.
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  44. Mick Smith (2008). Environmental Risks and Ethical Responsibilities. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):227-246.score: 96.0
    The question of environmental responsibility is addressed through comparisons between Hannah Arendt’s and Ulrich Beck’s accounts of the emergent and globally threatening risks associated with acting into nature. Both theorists have been extraordinarily influential in their respective fields but their insights, pointing toward the politicization of nature through human intervention, are rarely brought into conjunction. Important differences stem from Beck’s treatment of risks as systemic and unavoidable side effects of late modernity. Arendt, however, retains a more restrictive anthropogenic (...)
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  45. Iča Rojšek (2001). From Red to Green: Towards the Environmental Management in the Country in Transition. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (1):37 - 50.score: 92.0
    This paper investigates the driving forces behind the environment-oriented management in Slovenia, a country in transition. The study focuses on attititudes of managers towards different aspects of the concern for the environment, the most important sources of pressure on companies for better environmental performance, the potential conflict between environmental and other business goals, and perception of barriers to the environmentally responsible behaviour of a company. The study uncovers a strong belief that the government is responsible to prevent damage (...)
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  46. Şükrü Özen & Fatma Küskü (2009). Corporate Environmental Citizenship Variation in Developing Countries: An Institutional Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):297 - 313.score: 90.0
    This study focuses on why some companies in developing countries go beyond environmental regulations when implementing their corporate environmental social responsibilities or citizenship behavior. Drawing mainly upon the new institutional theory, this study develops a conceptual framework to explain three institutional factors: companies’ market orientations, industrial characteristics, and corporate identities. Accordingly, we suggest that companies from developing countries that are oriented to markets in developed countries, operate in highly concentrated industries, and have missionary identities adopt corporate environmental (...)
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  47. Shiu-Wan Hung & Shih-Chang Tseng (2010). A New Framework Integrating Environmental Effects Into Technology Evaluation. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):543 - 556.score: 90.0
    This study aims to propose a framework considering both economic issues and environmental effects in technology evaluation in order to provide firms' decision makers a useful reference in adopting technologies that will enable them to fulfill corporate social responsibilities and get competitive advantages at the same time. Recently, the demands for technology evaluation have increased with the flourishing development of technology licensing, technology transaction or joint venture on the one hand and with the pressing needs of environmental protection (...)
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  48. Irene M. Herremans, M. Sandy Herschovis & Stephanie Bertels (2009). Leaders and Laggards: The Influence of Competing Logics on Corporate Environmental Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):449 - 472.score: 90.0
    We study the sources of resistance to change among firms in the Canadian petroleum industry in response to a shift in societal level logics related to corporate environmental performance. Despite challenges to its legitimacy as a result of poor environmental performance, the Canadian petroleum industry was divided as to how to respond, with some members ignoring the concerns and resisting change (i.e., laggards) while others took action to ensure continued legitimacy (i.e., leaders). We examine why organizations within the (...)
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  49. Edina Eberhardt-Toth & David M. Wasieleski (2013). A Cognitive Elaboration Model of Sustainability Decision Making: Investigating Financial Managers' Orientation Toward Environmental Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):735-751.score: 90.0
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