Search results for 'Environmental sciences History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Derek Wall (1994). Green History: A Reader in Environmental Literature, Philosophy, and Politics. Routledge.score: 297.0
    Charting the origins of the modern ecology movement over more than two thousand years, this volume gives a voice to those hidden from history, revealing "green" themes within artistic and scientific thought. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  2. Ludmilla Jordanova, Roy Porter & D. Oldroyd (1999). Earth Sciences-Images of the Earth: Essays in the History of the Environmental Sciences. Annals of Science 56 (3):326-327.score: 264.0
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  3. W. Norton, Michael P. Brown, Paul Cloke, Jo Little, Verena Andermatt Conley, Irene Diamond, Peter Dickens, Roger Gottlieb, Olavi Grano & Anssi Paasi (1999). Adams, Guy and Balfour, Danny (1998) Unmasking Administrative Evil, Thousand Oaks: Sage. Allen, Beverly and Russo, Mary (1997) Revisioning Italy: National Identity and Global Culture, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Bowler, Peter (1992) The Norton History of the Environmental Sciences, New York: W. [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (1).score: 261.0
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  4. Dayuan Xue & Clem Tisdell (2002). Global Trade in GM Food and the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety: Consequences for China. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (4):337-356.score: 189.0
    The UN Cartagena Protocol onBiosafety adopted in Montreal, 29 January, 2000and opened for signature in Nairobi, 15–26 May,2000 will exert a profound effect oninternational trade in genetically modifiedorganisms (GMOs) and their products. In thispaper, the potential effects of variousarticles of the Protocol on international tradein GMOs are analyzed. Based on the presentstatus of imports of GMOs and domestic researchand development of biotechnology in China,likely trends in imports of foreign GM food andrelated products after China accedes to WTO isexplored. Also, China's (...)
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  5. Sahotra Sarkar (2005). Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 147.0
    This book explores the epistemological and ethical issues at the foundations of environmental philosophy, emphasizing the conservation of biodiversity. Sahota Sarkar criticizes previous attempts to attribute intrinsic value to nature and defends an anthropocentric position on biodiversity conservation based on an untraditional concept of transformative value. Unlike other studies in the field of environmental philosophy, this book is as much concerned with epistemological issues as with environmental ethics. It covers a broad range of topics, including problems of (...)
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  6. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 146.7
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments (...)
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  7. Geoffrey Hawthorn (1991). Plausible Worlds: Possibility and Understanding in History and the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    Possibilities haunt history. The force of our explanations of events turns on the alternative possibilities those explanations suggest. It is these possible worlds that give us our understanding; and in human affairs, we decide them by practical rather than theoretical judgment. In this widely acclaimed account of the role of counterfactuals in explanation, Geoffrey Hawthorn deploys extended examples to defend his argument. His conclusions cast doubt on existing assumptions about the nature and place of theory, and indeed of the (...)
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  8. Matthias Gross (2003). Essay Reviews: Caught Between the Nature/Society Divide: Environmental History at a Crossroads *. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (1):93-107.score: 144.0
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  9. Peter Wagner (2001). A History and Theory of the Social Sciences: Not All That is Solid Melts Into Air. Sage.score: 134.0
    Divided into two parts this book examines the train of social theory from the 19th century, through to the `organization of modernity', in relation to ideas of social planning, and as contributors to the `rationalistic revolution' of the `golden age' of capitalism in the 1950s and 60s. Part two examines key concepts in the social sciences. It begins with some of the broadest concepts used by social scientists: choice, decision, action and institution and moves on to examine the `collectivist (...)
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  10. Peter T. Manicas (1987). A History and Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Basil Blackwell.score: 128.0
     
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  11. Michael Lansing (2002). Environmental Ethics, Green Politics and the History of Predator Biology. Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (1):43 – 49.score: 127.0
    Understanding the ethics and politics of environmentalism, as well as predator biology, means thinking in new ways about objectivity. The history of predator biology shows how scientists order nature as they interact with non-humans. If science ultimately orders nature as its comprehends it, the implications for environmental ethics and politics, which continue to call on the authority of objective science, loom large.
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  12. Thomas Faunce (2012). Governing Planetary Nanomedicine: Environmental Sustainability and a UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Bioethics and Human Rights of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis (Global Solar Fuels and Foods). [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (1):15-27.score: 126.0
    Abstract Environmental and public health-focused sciences are increasingly characterised as constituting an emerging discipline—planetary medicine. From a governance perspective, the ethical components of that discipline may usefully be viewed as bestowing upon our ailing natural environment the symbolic moral status of a patient. Such components emphasise, for example, the origins and content of professional and social virtues and related ethical principles needed to promote global governance systems and policies that reduce ecological stresses and pathologies derived from human overpopulation, (...)
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  13. Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Editor's Introduction. In Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.), Why does history matter to philosophy and the sciences? De Gruyter.score: 122.7
  14. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 122.0
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...) (HPLS). The project focuses on the study and use of descriptions, observations, experiments, and recording techniques used by early microscopists to classify various species of water flea. The first published illustrations and descriptions of the water flea were included in the Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam’s, Historia Insectorum Generalis (1669) (Algemeene verhandeling van de bloedeloose dierkens. t’Utrrecht, Meinardus van Dreunen, ordinaris Drucker van d’Academie). After studying these, we first used the descriptions, techniques, and nomenclature recovered to observe, record, and classify the specimens collected from our university ponds. We then used updated recording techniques and image-based keys to observe and identify the specimens. The implementation of these newer techniques was guided in part by the observations and records that resulted from our use of the recovered historical methods of investigation. The series of HPLS labs constructed as part of this interdisciplinary project provided a space for students to consider and wrestle with the many philosophical issues that arise in the process of identifying an unknown organism and offered unique learning opportunities that engaged students’ curiosity and critical thinking skills. (shrink)
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  15. Roger Smith (1997). History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice? History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):22-39.score: 120.0
    This paper discusses the historical voice in the history of the human sci ences. I address the question, 'Who speaks?', as a question about disci plinary identities and conventions of writing - identities and conventions which have the appearance of conditions of knowledge, in an area of activity where academic history and the history of science or intellectual history meet. If, as this paper contends, the subject-matter of the history of the human sciences is (...)
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  16. James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.score: 120.0
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a (...)
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  17. Rory Spowers (2002). Rising Tides: A History of the Environmental Revolution and Visions for an Ecological Age. Canongate.score: 120.0
    Rising Tidesis an extensively researched and engagingly written examination of the many factors that have shaped ecological thought.
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  18. Leire Escajedo San-Epifanio & Mickey Gjerris (2012). Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics From EURSAFE 2010. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):793-796.score: 117.0
    Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics from EURSAFE 2010 Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9390-2 Authors Leire Escajedo San-Epifanio, Department of Constitutional Law and History of Political Thought, Faculty of Social Sciences and Communication, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain Mickey Gjerris, Faculty of Science, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print (...)
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  19. Stephen Bocking (2012). Science, Salmon, and Sea Lice: Constructing Practice and Place in an Environmental Controversy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):681 - 716.score: 115.0
    Over the last three decades salmon aquaculture has become both a significant coastal industry and a focus of controversy regarding its environmental impacts. Both circumstances have also provoked a great deal of environmental research. This article examines one episode in the history of this research. The Broughton Archipelago is a region of islands and channels on the Pacific coast of Canada, densely populated with salmon farms. Beginning in 2001 this region attracted researchers from several institutions, who examined (...)
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  20. Jay Odenbaugh (2010). Philosophy of the Environmental Sciences. In P. D. Magnus & Jacob Busch (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 114.0
    In this essay, I consider three philosophical issues that arise in the environmental sciences. First, these sciences depend on mathematical models and simulations which are highly idealized and are coupled with very uncertain data. Why should we trust these models and simulations? Second, in standard hypothesis testing, the burden of proof is in favor of the null hypothesis which claims some causal factor has no effect. The alternative hypothesis is accepted only when the likelihood of the null (...)
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  21. Richard W. Burkhardt (1999). Ethology, Natural History, the Life Sciences, and the Problem of Place. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):489 - 508.score: 114.0
    Investigators of animal behavior since the eighteenth century have sought to make their work integral to the enterprises of natural history and/or the life sciences. In their efforts to do so, they have frequently based their claims of authority on the advantages offered by the special places where they have conducted their research. The zoo, the laboratory, and the field have been major settings for animal behavior studies. The issue of the relative advantages of these different sites has (...)
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  22. Kevin C. Elliott (2009). The Ethical Significance of Language in the Environmental Sciences: Case Studies From Pollution Research. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):157 – 173.score: 112.0
    This paper examines how ethically significant assumptions and values are embedded not only in environmental policies but also in the language of the environmental sciences. It shows, based on three case studies associated with contemporary pollution research, how the choice of scientific categories and terms can have at least four ethically significant effects: influencing the future course of scientific research; altering public awareness or attention to environmental phenomena; affecting the attitudes or behavior of key decision makers; (...)
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  23. Theodore M. Porter & Dorothy Ross (2003). The Cambridge History of Science: The Modern Social Sciences. History of Science 7.score: 108.0
    Forty-two essays by authors from five continents and many disciplines provide a synthetic account of the history of the social sciences-including behavioral and economic sciences since the late eighteenth century. The authors emphasize the cultural and intellectual preconditions of social science, and its contested but important role in the history of the modern world. While there are many historical books on particular disciplines, there are very few about the social sciences generally, and none that deal (...)
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  24. Ricardo Rozzi (2010). Field Environmental Philosophy. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11-12):85-109.score: 108.0
    During our current free market era, a prevailing utilitarian ethics centered on monetary cost benefit analyses continues overriding incessantly a plethora of diverse forms of ecological knowledge and ethics present in the communities of South America, and other regions of the world. For the first time in human history, more than 50% of the world’s population lives in cities, and speaks only one of eleven dominant languages, loosing contact with the vast biodiversity and the 7,000 languages that are still (...)
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  25. John C. Burnham (2000). Changing Metaphors in History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):121-124.score: 102.0
    A generation or more ago, as the Cold War flourished, the continental European\nscholars whom I met seemed odd to me. They were, virtually without\nexception, totally preoccupied with whether their scholarship harmonized\nwith Marxism or refuted Marxism. This focus cut across disciplinary lines.\nIndeed, a basic assumption united these colleagues: the scholars’ world,\nwhether Karl Marx or Max Weber, consisted of centralized bureaucracies\nsuitable for socialism or at least for orderly organization.\nNorth American scholars shared with the Europeans, not the preoccupation\nwith Marxism, but the idea that (...)
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  26. Christopher J. Preston & Steven H. Corey (2005). Public Health and Environmentalism: Adding Garbarge to the History of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):3-21.score: 102.0
    There exists in the United States a popular account of the historical roots of environmental philosophy which is worth noting not simply as a matter of historical interest, but also as a source book for some of the key ideas that lend shape to contemporary North American environmental philosophy. However, this folk wisdom about the historical beginnings of North American environmental thinking is incomplete. The wilderness-based history commonly used by environmental philosophers should be supplemented with (...)
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  27. Fernando Vidal (1992). Jean Starobinski and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 5 (1):73-85.score: 102.0
    The name of the Genevan critic Jean Starobinski will most likely evoke masterful\nreadings of Rousseau and Montaigne, or insightful reconstructions of the world\nof the Enlightenment. With the possible exception of the history of melancholy,\nmuch more rarely will it be associated with the history of psychology and\npsychiatry. A small number of the critic’s contributions to this field have\nappeared in some of his books. Most of them, however, remain scattered, and\nnothing suggests that they are known as widely as they deserve.\nStarobinski’s (...)
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  28. Rolf Gruner (1967). Understanding in the Social Sciences and History. Inquiry 10 (1-4):151 – 163.score: 100.0
    Understanding in its widest sense is the aim of all rational knowledge. A distinction can be made between interpretation (leading to the understanding of meanings) and explanation (leading to the understanding of facts). The view that in the social sciences facts and meanings are the same is criticized. In respect of the specific understanding of human and social facts empathetic and rational understanding are distinguished and some of the difficulties pointed out inherent in both, in particular with regard to (...)
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  29. Filip M. Alexandrescu (2009). Not as Natural as It Seems: The Social History of the Environment in American Sociology. History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):47-80.score: 99.0
    This article argues against Catton and Dunlap’s claims that the natural environment has been ignored or downplayed in American sociology before the emergence of environmental sociology in the 1970s. By reviewing a collection of 86 sociology textbooks between 1894 and 1980, the article provides quantitative evidence regarding the scope and types of references to the natural environment in mainstream sociology. The bulk of the article is based on an interpretive-historical analysis of the different representations of the environment in the (...)
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  30. Mano Daniel & Lester E. Embree (eds.) (1994). Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 99.0
    Phenomenology of the Cultural Disciplines is an interdisciplinary study, reflecting the recent emergence of various particular forms of `phenomenological philosophy of ...'. Included are such fields as psychology, social sciences and history, as well as environmental philosophy, ethnic studies, religion and even more practical disciplines, such as medicine, psychiatry, politics, and technology. The Introduction provides a way of understanding how these various developments are integrated. On the basis of a Husserlian notion of culture, it proposes a generic (...)
     
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  31. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). ‘“What’s So Great About Science?” Feyerabend on the Ideological Use and Abuse of Science. In Elena Aronova & Simone Turchetti (eds.), The Politics of Science Studies.score: 99.0
    It is very well known that from the late-1960s onwards Feyerabend began to radically challenge some deeply-held ideas about the history and methodology of the sciences. It is equally well known that, from around the same period, he also began to radically challenge wider claims about the value and place of the sciences within modern societies, for instance by calling for the separation of science and the state and by questioning the idea that the sciences served (...)
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  32. Santimay Chatterjee, M. K. Dasgupta & A. Ghosh (eds.) (1997). Studies in History of Sciences. Asiatic Society.score: 98.7
     
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  33. Peter S. Alagona (2012). A Sanctuary for Science: The Hastings Natural History Reservation and the Origins of the University of California's Natural Reserve System. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):651 - 680.score: 98.0
    In 1937 Joseph Grinnell founded the University of California's (U.C.) first biological field station, the Hastings Natural History Reservation. Hastings became a center for field biology on the West Coast, and by 1960 it was serving as a model for the creation of additional U.C. reserves. Today, the U.C. Natural Reserve System (NRS) is the largest and most diverse network of university-based biological field stations in the world, with 36 sites covering more than 135,000 acres. This essay examines the (...)
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  34. Franklin M. Fisher (1960). On the Analysis of History and the Interdependence of the Social Sciences. Philosophy of Science 27 (2):147-158.score: 98.0
    The views of some historians and philosophers of history as to the possibility of fruitful historical generalization seem at odds with the underlying methodology of the other social sciences. A formal model of the world historical process is here presented within which this apparent contradiction is seen to be resolvable in terms of modern theories of probability and stochastic processes. This is done by giving rigorous form to procedures and statements in the social sciences. A formal treatment (...)
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  35. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 96.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity (...)
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  36. Christine James (2005). Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1).score: 96.0
    The history of sonar technology provides a fascinating case study for philosophers of science. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has (...)
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  37. Wilhelm Dilthey (1988). Introduction to the Human Sciences: An Attempt to Lay a Foundation for the Study of Society and History. Wayne State University Press.score: 96.0
    This book is a pioneering effort to elaborate a general theory of the human sciences, especially history, and to distinguish these sciences radically from the ...
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  38. Greta Jones (1994). Reviews : Roger Smith, Inhibition, History and Meaning in the Sciences of Mind and Brain. London: Free Association Books, 1992. £37.50, Xi + 323 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (3):121-122.score: 96.0
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  39. M. D. Grmek (2000). [Definition of the Real Domain of the History of Sciences and Exploring the Relationship with the Philosophy of Science]. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):5-12.score: 96.0
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  40. Henrika Kuklick (2011). Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia. Minerva 49 (3):355-358.score: 96.0
    Stuart Macintyre, The Poor Relation. A History of Social Sciences in Australia Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 355-358 DOI 10.1007/s11024-011-9173-3 Authors Henrika Kuklick, History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania, 303 Cohen Hall, 249 South 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6304, USA Journal Minerva Online ISSN 1573-1871 Print ISSN 0026-4695 Journal Volume Volume 49 Journal Issue Volume 49, Number 3.
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  41. Jean Starobinski (1992). Jean Starobinski and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 5 (1).score: 96.0
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  42. John Mcclain Watson (2004). From Interpretation to Identification: A History of Facial Images in the Sciences of Emotion. History of the Human Sciences 17 (1):29-51.score: 96.0
    Although images of faces have long been employed in the scientific study of emotion, the objectives and assumptions motivating their use have shifted according to the various fields and research programs within which they have been put to use. This article traces these shifts through three such fields – the social psychology of interwar America, cross-cultural research of the 1970s, and the contemporary neurosciences of emotion – in order to assess the recent use of facial images as a means of (...)
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  43. Sharon E. Kingsland (2009). Frits Went's Atomic Age Greenhouse: The Changing Labscape on the Lab-Field Border. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):289 - 324.score: 96.0
    In Landscapes and Labscapes Robert Kohler emphasized the separation between laboratory and field cultures and the creation of new "hybrid" or mixed practices as field sciences matured in the early twentieth century. This article explores related changes in laboratory practices, especially novel designs for the analysis of organism-environment relations in the mid-twentieth century. American ecologist Victor Shelford argued in 1929 that technological improvements and indoor climate control should be applied to ecological laboratories, but his recommendations were too ambitious for (...)
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  44. Michel Morange (2001). On the Relations Between History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences and Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):65 - 74.score: 96.0
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  45. Petteri Pietikainen (2003). Consciousness Historicized: Philosophical History and the Nature of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):151-158.score: 96.0
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  46. Jean-Marie Tremblay (2000). Vincent Descombes, Philosophie des Représentations Collectives. Un Article Publié Dans Revue Scientifique, History of the Human Sciences, Vol. 13, No 1, 2000. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 13 (1).score: 96.0
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  47. Antonio Tarajano Roselló (2013). Regional History from The Medical Sciences perspective. Humanidades Médicas 13 (3):887-910.score: 96.0
    Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de sistematizar los principales postulados existentes respecto a la Historia Regional como disciplina y su relación con la asignatura Historia de Cuba. La información aportada se procesó según los métodos científicos de análisis y síntesis e histórico lógico. Ello incluyó la interpretación de los criterios vertidos por especialistas que permiten considerar a Camagüey como una región histórica, en estrecho vínculo con las condiciones en las que se imparte la Historia de Cuba en (...)
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  48. Bruce Mazlish (2001). Reflections on the Human Sciences and Their History. History of the Human Sciences 14 (4):140-147.score: 96.0
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  49. Richard Bellamy, Peter M. Logan, John I. Brooks Iii, David Couzens Hoy, Michael Donnelly & James M. Glass (forthcoming). History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences.score: 96.0
     
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  50. Alix Cohen (2009). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 96.0
    Machine generated contents note: Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * (...)
     
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