Search results for 'Environmentalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  65
    Jeffrey E. Foss (2008). Beyond Environmentalism: A Philosophy of Nature. Wiley.
    Beyond Environmentalism is the first book of its kind to present a timely and relevant analysis of environmentalism.
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  2.  65
    Randal Beeman (1995). Friends of the Land and the Rise of Environmentalism, 1940–1954. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (1):1-16.
    The rise of the postwar environmental movement is rooted in the development of ecological consciousness within intellectual circles as well as the general public. Though many commentators cite the 1960s as the focal point of the new environmentalism, the ecological ethic had actually evolved by the 1930s in the writings and speeches of both scientists and public commentators. Agricultural conservationists led the way in broadcasting the message of ecology. Friends of the Land, an agriculturally-oriented conservation organization formed in 1940 (...)
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  3.  33
    Vassos Argyrou (2005). The Logic of Environmentalism: Anthropology, Ecology, and Postcoloniality. Berghahn Books.
    This bold argument is at the center of this book that challenges the widespread assumption that environmentalism reflects a radical departure from modernity.
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  4.  25
    M. L. J. Wissenburg & Yoram Levy (eds.) (2004). Liberal Democracy and Environmentalism: The End of Environmentalism? Routledge.
    This work provides a reflective assessment of recent developments, social relevance and future of environmental political theory, concluding that although the alleged pacification of environmentalism is more than skin deep, it is not yet quite deep enough. This book will appeal to students and researchers of social science and philosophers with an interest in environmental issues.
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  5.  33
    Gerald Doppelt (2002). Can Traditional Ethical Theory Meet the Challenges of Feminism, Multiculturalism, and Environmentalism? Journal of Ethics 6 (4):383-405.
    This paper aims to evaluate thechallenges posed to traditional ethical theoryby the ethics of feminism, multiculturalism,and environmentalism. I argue that JamesSterba, in his Three Challenges to Ethics,provides a distorted assessment by trying toassimilate feminism, multiculturalism, andenvironmentalism into traditional utilitarian,virtue, and Kantian/Rawlsian ethics – which hethus seeks to rescue from their alleged``biases.'''' In the cases of feminism andmulticulturalism, I provide an alternativeaccount on which these new critical discourseschallenge the whole paradigm or conception ofethical inquiry embodied in the tradition.They embrace different (...)
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  6.  14
    Ernest LePore (1990). Subjectivism and Environmentalism. Inquiry 33 (2):197-214.
    The main thesis of this paper is that the most cogent demands of subjectivity, at least with respect to questions concerning the contents of our thoughts, can be accommodated within an objectivist framework. I begin with two theses: (1) Subjectivity: I can know (the contents of) my own thoughts without appeal to any knowledge of features external to my mind; (2) Environmentalism: (The contents of) my thoughts are determined by features external to my mind, at least in this sense: (...)
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  7. John Nolan (1992). The Computational Metaphor and Environmentalism. AI and Society 6 (1):50-61.
    The Computational Metaphor is an extremely influential notion, and more than any other trend has given rise to the field of Cognitive Science. Environmentalism is at present better formalised as a political movement than as a scientific paradigm, despite significant research by Gibson and his followers. This article attempts to address the difficult problem of synthesising these two apparently antagonistic research paradigms.
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  8.  23
    Rosa Chun (2009). Ethical Values and Environmentalism in China: Comparing Employees From State-Owned and Private Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):341 - 348.
    Industrial pollution is of both national and international concern in the context where one country's emissions contribute to the problem of global warming. Existing studies have focused on government and regulations rather than on employees. The context of this study is in respect of 472 workers in seven Chinese energy companies in Shanxi province in China, one of the biggest coal mining regions and a region most responsible for environmental pollution. The key findings are two-fold: first, employees' values were positively (...)
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  9. Tony Smith (1995). The Case Against Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):126-144.
    Free market environmentalists believe that the extension of private property rights and market transactions is sufficient to address environmental difficulties. But there is no invisible hand operating in markets that ensures that environmentally sound practices will be employed just because property rights are in private hands. Also, liability laws and the court systems cannot be relied upon to force polluters to internalize the social costs of pollution. Third, market prices do not provide an objective measure of environmental matters. Finally, there (...)
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  10. Robert Kirkman (2002). Skeptical Environmentalism the Limits of Philosophy and Science. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11.  31
    Raymond E. Grizzle & Christopher B. Barrett (1998). The One Body of Christian Environmentalism. Zygon 33 (2):233-253.
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  12.  7
    Douglas Torgerson (1999). The Promise of Green Politics: Environmentalism and the Public Sphere. Duke University Press.
    InThe Promise of Green PoliticsDouglas Torgerson offers a survey of different schools of ecological thought, discusses their implications for the larger ...
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  13.  4
    Jennifer Mcerlean (2014). The Accidental Environmentalist: Elliott on Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):283-285.
    In this brief piece, Jennifer McErlean comments on Kevin Elliott’s thesis that we should decrease or even cease philosophical efforts to build more inclusive biocentric ethical accounts and instead increase efforts to build indirect anthropocentric arguments. While McErlean agrees that it is sensible to marshal a multiplicity of standpoints to strengthen policies that protect the natural world, she disagrees that philosophers no longer need to consider whether nature has intrinsic value. Two specific criticisms are offered. One is that indirect arguments (...)
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  14.  55
    James P. Sterba (2001). Three Challenges to Ethics: Environmentalism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. Oxford University Press.
    In this unique work, James P. Sterba argues that traditional ethics has yet to confront the three significant challenges posed by environmentalism, feminism, and multiculturalism. He maintains that while traditional ethics has been quite successful at dealing with the problems it faces, it has not addressed the possibility that its solutions to these problems are biased in favor of humans, men, and Western culture. In Three Challenges to Ethics: Environmentalism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism, Sterba examines each of these challenges. (...)
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  15.  82
    Trevor Hogan (1994). Reviews : Robyn Eckersley, Environmentalism and Political Theory: Toward an Ecocentric Approach (State University of New York/UCL Press, 1992); Robert E. Goodin, Green Political Theory (Polity Press, 1992); Peter Hay and Robyn Eckersley (Eds), Ecopolitical Theory: Essaysfrom Australia, (Board of Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, 1992); Peter Hay, Robyn Eckersley and Geoff Holloway (Eds) Environmental Politics in Australia and New Zealand (Board of Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, 1989); Drew Hutton (Ed.), Green Politics in Australia (Angus and Robertson, 1987); Michael Muetzelfeldt (Ed.), Society, State and Politics in Australia (Pluto Press, 1992). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 38 (1):165-177.
    Reviews : Robyn Eckersley, Environmentalism and Political Theory: Toward an Ecocentric Approach ; Robert E. Goodin, Green Political Theory ; Peter Hay and Robyn Eckersley , Ecopolitical Theory: Essaysfrom Australia, ; Peter Hay, Robyn Eckersley and Geoff Holloway Environmental Politics in Australia and New Zealand ; Drew Hutton , Green Politics in Australia ; Michael Muetzelfeldt , Society, State and Politics in Australia.
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  16.  85
    Ramachandra Guha (1989). Radical American Environmentalism and Wilderness Perservation: A Third World Critique. Environmental Ethics 11 (1):71-83.
    I present a Third World critique of the trend in American environmentalism known as deep ecology, analyzing each of deep ecology’s central tenets: the distinction between anthropocentrism and biocentrism, the focus on wildemess preservation, the invocation of Eastem traditions, and the belief that it represents the most radical trend within environmentalism. I argue that the anthropocentrism/biocentrism distinction is of little use in understanding the dynamics of environmental degredation, that the implementation of the wildemess agenda is causing serious deprivation (...)
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  17.  12
    Ramachandra Guha (2010). Radical American Environmentalism and Wilderness Preservation : A Third World Critique. In Craig Hanks (ed.), Environmental Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell 71-83.
    I present a Third World critique of the trend in American environmentalism known as deep ecology, analyzing each of deep ecology’s central tenets: the distinction between anthropocentrism and biocentrism, the focus on wildemess preservation, the invocation of Eastem traditions, and the belief that it represents the most radical trend within environmentalism. I argue that the anthropocentrism/biocentrism distinction is of little use in understanding the dynamics of environmental degredation, that the implementation of the wildemess agenda is causing serious deprivation (...)
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  18.  5
    Allen Carlson & Sheila Lintott (eds.) (2008). Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. Columbia University Press.
    The essays in the final section explicitly bring together aesthetics, ethics, and environmentalism to explore the ways in which each might affect the others.
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  19.  22
    Jim Cheney (1989). The Neo-Stoicism of Radical Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 11 (4):293-325.
    Feminist analysis has eonvineed me that certain tendencies within that form of radical environmentalism known as deep ecology-with its supposed rejection of the Western ethical tradition and its adoption of what looks to be a feminist attitude toward the environment and our relationship to nature-constitute one more chapter in the story of Western alienation from nature. In this paper I deepen my critique of these tendencies toward alienation within deep ecology by historicizing my critique in the light of a (...)
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  20.  16
    Colette Sciberras (2010). Buddhist Philosophy and the Ideals of Environmentalism. Dissertation, Durham University
    I examine the consistency between contemporary environmentalist ideals and Buddhist philosophy, focusing, first, on the problem of value in nature. I argue that the teachings found in the Pāli canon cannot easily be reconciled with a belief in the intrinsic value of life, whether human or otherwise. This is because all existence is regarded as inherently unsatisfactory, and all beings are seen as impermanent and insubstantial, while the ultimate spiritual goal is often viewed, in early Buddhism, as involving a deep (...)
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  21.  33
    Mark Sagoff (1992). Free‐Market Versus Libertarian Environmentalism. Critical Review 6 (2-3):211-230.
    Libertarians favor a free market for intrinsic reasons: it embodies liberty, accountability, consent, cooperation, and other virtues. Additionally, if property rights against trespasses such as pollution are enforced and if public lands are transferred as private property to environmental groups, a free market may also protect the environment. In contrast, Terry Anderson and Donald Leal's Free Market Environmentalism favors a free market solely on instrumental grounds: markets allocate resources efficiently. The authors apparently follow cost?benefit planners in endorsing a specious (...)
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  22.  17
    Sanford S. Levy (2003). The Biophilia Hypothesis and Anthropocentric Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):227-246.
    Much anthropocentric environmental argument is limited by a narrow conception of how humans can benefit from nature. E. O. Wilson defends a more robust anthropocentric environmentalism based on a broader understanding of these benefits. At the center of his argument is the biophilia hypothesis according to which humans have an evolutionarily crafted, aesthetic and spiritual affinity for nature. However,the “biophilia hypothesis” covers a variety of claims, some modest and some more extreme. Insofar as we have significant evidence for biophilia, (...)
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  23.  18
    Ty Raterman (2008). An Environmentalist's Lament on Predation. Environmental Ethics 30 (4):417-434.
    That some animals need to prey on others in order to live is lamentable. While no one wants predators to die of starvation, a world in which no animal needed to prey on others would, in some meaningful sense, be a better world. Predation is lamentable for four primary reasons: (1) predation often inflicts pain on prey animals; (2) it often frustrates prey animals’ desires; (3) anything other than lamentation—which would include relishing predation as well as being indifferent to it—is (...)
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  24.  34
    Allen Thompson (2006). Environmentalism, Moral Responsibility, and the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):269 – 278.
    In 'Doing and Allowing', Samuel Scheffler argues that if a person sees herself as subject to norms of individual moral responsibility, then the content of her first-order substantive norms of individual moral responsibility must attribute greater responsibility to what one does than to what one could, but fails, to prevent. This paper is about how a morally responsible agent could deny the doctrine of doing and allowing, why an environmentalist should, and what this means for environmental ethical theory.
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  25.  26
    Allen Carlson (2010). Contemporary Environmental Aesthetics and the Requirements of Environmentalism. Environmental Values 19 (3):289 - 314.
    Since aesthetic experience is vital for the protection of nature, I address the relationship between environmental aesthetics and environmentalism. I first review two traditional positions, the picturesque approach and formalism. Some environmentalists fault the modes of aesthetic appreciation associated with these views, charging they are anthropocentric, scenery-obsessed, superficial, subjective, and/or morally vacuous. In light of these apparent failings of traditional aesthetics of nature, I suggest five requirements of environmentalism: that aesthetic appreciation of nature should be acentric, environment-focused, serious, (...)
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  26.  12
    Ian Harris (2007). Landscape Aesthetics and Environmentalism: Some Observations on the Representation of Nature in Buddhist and Western Art1. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):149-168.
    (2007). Landscape Aesthetics and Environmentalism: Some Observations on the Representation of Nature in Buddhist and Western Art1. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 8, Buddhism and the environment, pp. 149-168. doi: 10.1080/14639940701636125.
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  27.  13
    Rick O.’Neil (2000). Animal Liberation Versus Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):183-190.
    Animal liberationism and environmentalism generally are considered incompatible positions. But, properly conceived, they simply provide answers to different questions, concerning moral standing and intrinsic value, respectively. The two views together constitute an environmental ethic that combines environmental justice and environmental care. I show that this approach is not only consistent but defensible.
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  28.  20
    Herman E. Daly (1992). Free‐Market Environmentalism: Turning a Good Servant Into a Bad Master. Critical Review 6 (2-3):171-183.
    The virtue of internalizing environmental costs so that prices reflect full social opportunity costs at the margin, reaffirmed by Terry Anderson and Donald Leal, is unarguable. Beyond that, however, Anderson and Leal's Free Market Environmentalism neglects the classic works in the intellectual tradition to which it is supposed to be a contribution; is unconvincing and inconsistent in the functions it ascribes to the ?environmental entrepreneur?; conflates problems of distribution and scale with the problem of allocation; ignores international dimensions; and (...)
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  29. Gayil Talshir (2004). The Role of Environmentalism : From the Silent Spring to the Silent Revolution. In M. L. J. Wissenburg & Yoram Levy (eds.), Liberal Democracy and Environmentalism: The End of Environmentalism? Routledge
     
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  30.  28
    James W. Nickel & Eduardo Viola (1994). Integrating Environmentalism and Human Rights. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):265-273.
    The environmental and human rights movements have valuable contributions to make to each other. Environmentalists can contribute to the greening of human rights by getting the human rights movement to recognize a right to a safe environment, to see humans as part of nature, and to begin considering the idea that nature may have claims of its own. The human rights movement can contribute to environmentalism by getting environmentalists to recognize that they have strong reasons to support rights to (...)
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  31.  39
    James W. Sheppard (2006). The Paradox of Urban Environmentalism: Problem and Possibility. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):299 – 315.
    Over half of the world's population (3 billon people) now lives in urban environments. The combination of people, industry, and commerce enmeshed in environments over-determined by plans, designs, and configurations that continue to emphasize ease, efficiency, and spatial sprawl over ecological constraints and sustainability help to make urban environments the primary contributors to multiple types of ecological degradation. With this in mind, urban environments demand greater sustained theoretical and practical attention than has been and is the norm under status quo (...)
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  32.  30
    Nathaniel Barrett (2011). Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (Eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):659-668.
    Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9258-2 Authors Nathaniel Barrett, Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion 1711 Massachusetts Ave NW #308 Washington DC 20036 USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  33.  12
    Peter Quigley (1992). Rethinking Resistance: Environmentalism, Literature, and Poststructural Theory. Environmental Ethics 14 (4):291-306.
    I argue that with the advent of poststructuralism, traditional theories of representation, truth, and resistance have been seriously brought into question. References to the “natural” and the “wild” cannot escape the poststructural attack against foundational concepts and the constituting character of human-centered language. I explore the ways in which environmental movements and literary expression have tended to posit pre-ideological essences, thereby replicating patterns of power and authority. I also point to how environmentalism might be reshaped in light of poststructuralism (...)
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  34.  23
    James Gustave Speth (2011). Letter to Liberals: Liberalism, Environmentalism, and Economic Growth. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):43-54.
    Many American progressives consider themselves both liberals and environmentalists, and, though the organisations representing these two causes should be working together, they rarely do. Moreover, the emerging split over the role of economic growth could push liberal and environmentalist leaders further apart. This lecture discusses how to bridge the gap between liberals and environmentalists by fusing progressive causes into a common agenda. The two causes are not, as many believe, mutually exclusive, but are instead mutually supportive: liberals need environmentalists to (...)
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  35.  12
    Alan Carter (2011). Towards a Multidimensional, Environmentalist Ethic. Environmental Values 20 (3):347-374.
    There has been a process of moral extensionism within environmental ethics from anthropocentrism, through zoocentrism, to ecocentrism. This article maps key elements of that process, and concludes that each of these ethical positions fails as a fully adequate, environmentalist ethic, and does so because of an implicit assumption that is common within normative theory. This notwithstanding, each position may well contribute a value. The problem that then arises is how to trade off those values against each other when they conflict. (...)
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  36.  20
    Eduardo Viola (1994). Integrating Environmentalism and Human Rights. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):265-273.
    The environmental and human rights movements have valuable contributions to make to each other. Environmentalists can contribute to the greening of human rights by getting the human rights movement to recognize a right to a safe environment, to see humans as part of nature, and to begin considering the idea that nature may have claims of its own. The human rights movement can contribute to environmentalism by getting environmentalists to recognize that they have strong reasons to support rights to (...)
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  37. Yoram Levy (2004). The End of Environmentalism (as We Know It). In M. L. J. Wissenburg & Yoram Levy (eds.), Liberal Democracy and Environmentalism: The End of Environmentalism? Routledge
  38.  3
    Kevin Gary Behrens (2014). An African Relational Environmentalism and Moral Considerability. Environmental Ethics 36 (1):63-82.
    There is a pervasive presumption that African thought is inherently anthropocentric and has little to contribute to environmental ethics. Against this view, a promising African environmentalism can be be found in a belief in a fundamental interrelatedness between natural objects. What establishes moral considerability on this African view is that entities are part of the interconnected web of life. This position accords moral standing to all living things, groups of living things, as well as inanimate natural entities. This view (...)
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  39.  9
    Robert Frodeman (1992). Radical Environmentalism and the Political Roots of Postmodernism. Environmental Ethics 14 (4):307-319.
    I examine the close relationship between radical environmentalism and postmodernism. I argue that there is an incoherence within most postmodernist thought, born of an unwillingness or incapacity to distinguish between claims true from an ontological or epistemological perspective and those appropriate to the exigencies of political life. The failure to distinguish which differences make a difference not only vitiates postmodernist thought, but also runs up against some of the fundamental assumptions of radical environmentalism.
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  40.  2
    Laurent Dobuzinskis (1992). Is Progressive Environmentalism an Oxymoron? Critical Review 6 (2-3):283-303.
    Environmentalism has been a part of the ideological landscape of liberal societies for nearly three decades. Classical liberals have not yet succeeded, however, in articulating a coherent response that would be relevant to politically active environmentalists, as well as to liberals receptive to postmodern ideas. Robert C. Paehlke argues that, conservative liberals being in fact hostile to environmental thinking, moderate progressivism and environmentalism should enter into a close alliance. This paper challenges both assertions. Admittedly, not all currents within (...)
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  41.  12
    Rick O'Neil (2000). Animal Liberation Versus Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):183-190.
    Animal liberationism and environmentalism generally are considered incompatible positions. But, properly conceived, they simply provide answers to different questions, concerning moral standing and intrinsic value, respectively. The two views together constitute an environmental ethic that combines environmental justice and environmental care. I show that this approach is not only consistent but defensible.
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  42.  5
    Avner de-Shalit (1996). Ruralism or Environmentalism? Environmental Values 5 (1):47 - 58.
    Recent works on the historical sources of the environmental movement neglect environmental philosophy. They therefore fail to distinguish between two different currents of thought: ruralism – the romantic glorification of rural life; and environmentalism – a philosophy which is based on scientific information, anti-speciesism and respect for all organisms. These works, therefore, mistakenly identify 'political ecology' with right-wing ideologies.
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  43.  16
    Roger J. H. King (2006). Playing with Boundaries: Critical Reflections on Strategies for an Environmental Culture and the Promise of Civic Environmentalism. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (2):173 – 186.
    This essay reflects on three strategic visions of how society might develop in the direction of a more environmentally responsible culture. These strategies - green technology, ecocentrism, and civic environmentalism - offer promising elements of what we need. However, each fails in different ways to successfully explain how citizens, caught up in consumerist practices and their supporting belief systems, can be led to take the transformative steps needed to build a culture that engages responsibly and respectfully with the natural (...)
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  44.  2
    Paul D’Ambrosio (2013). Rethinking Environmental Issues in a Daoist Context: Why Daoism Is and Is Not Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 35 (4):407-417.
    As the extent our impact on the environment becomes ever more clear, the search for ways to limit or even remedy some negative effects of our actions broadens. From science to religion, scholars in almost every field have been working hard to try to contribute to a healthier relationship between human beings and the natural world. In the humanities the issue is somewhat difficult. Because the topic is relatively new, there are few thinkers or traditions that deal with relevant environmental (...)
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  45.  10
    Brian Garvey (2011). Darwinism and Environmentalism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:67-82.
    A number of authors have combined a commitment to Darwinian evolution as a major source of insight into human nature with a strong commitment to environmentalist concerns. The most notable of these is perhaps Edward O. Wilson, in a series of books. Yet it may appear that there is a tension between Darwinism as a world-view – or least some major aspects of it – and a concern for non-human entities as worthy of concern in their own right. In the (...)
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  46.  10
    Douglas K. Detterman, Lynne T. Gabriel & Joanne M. Ruthsatz (1998). Absurd Environmentalism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):411-412.
    The position advocated in the target article should be called “absurd environmentalism.” Literature showing that general intelligence is related to musical ability is not cited. Also ignored is the heritability of musical talent. Retrospective studies supporting practice over talent are incapable of showing differences in talent, because subjects are self-selected on talent. Reasons for the popularity of absurd environmentalism are discussed.
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  47.  8
    Mark Sagoff (1994). Environmentalism Vs. Value Subjectivism: Rejoinder to Anderson and Leal. Critical Review 8 (3):467-473.
    (1994). Environmentalism vs. value subjectivism: Rejoinder to Anderson and Leal. Critical Review: Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 467-473. doi: 10.1080/08913819408443353.
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  48. Chiara Certomà (2006). Ecology, Environmentalism and System Theory. Kybernetes. The International Journal of Systems and Cybernetics 35 (6).
    The paper identifies the relation between ecology and environmentalism through the emergence of system theory.
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  49.  9
    Daniel Somers Smith (2001). Place-Based Environmentalism and Global Warming: Conceptual Contradictions of American Environmentalism. Ethics and International Affairs 15 (2):117–134.
    Although American environmentalism has had considerable success in addressing threats to particular places and resources, this well-organized and enormously popular social movement has not resulted in effective action on the problem of global warming.
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  50.  2
    James Hatley (2007). Sensing Environmentalism Anew. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):77-93.
    Merleau-Ponty advances a notion of witness in The Visible and the Invisible, which could be termed “gestate.” Gestate witness involves an acknowledgement through one's own body of how another living entity is born into its own body. This notion of witness is helpful in answering Anthony Weston's challenge that a sufficiently positive notion of environmentalism and so of environmental responsibility be developed, one that takes seriously how we come into contact with a more-than-human animate world. The work of biologist (...)
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