Search results for 'Epic poetry, Greek History and criticism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Hermann Ferdinand Fränkel (1975). Early Greek Poetry and Philosophy: A History of Greek Epic, Lyric, and Prose to the Middle of the Fifth Century. B. Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  3.  28
    Richard Seaford (2004). Money and the Early Greek Mind: Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    How were the Greeks of the sixth century BC able to invent philosophy and tragedy? Richard Seaford argues that a large part of the answer can be found in another momentous development, the invention and rapid spread of coinage. By transforming social relations, monetization contributed to the concepts of the universe as an impersonal system (fundamental to Presocratic philosophy) and of the individual alienated from his own kin and from the gods, as found in tragedy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4. Paolo Vivante (1997). Homeric Rhythm: A Philosophical Study. Greenwood Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  57
    Mark Buchan (2004). The Limits of Heroism: Homer and the Ethics of Reading. University of Michigan Press.
    Introduction The Odyssey is a poem of paradox. On the one hand, it is the "most teleologi- cal of epics,"' a story of a man's desire, long frustrated but ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    José Carlos Bermejo Barrera (2005). On History Considered as Epic Poetry. History and Theory 44 (2):182-194.
    This essay defines history as an interaction of three elements: description, evocation, and expression. These three elements should interact and combine without any of them overwhelming the remaining two. In combining the three elements, history carries on from epic poetry, which was its source. Highlighting the three elements reveals the ways history synthesizes the three historical stages outlined by Comte, namely, the theological, the metaphysical, and the scientific.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  5
    José Carlos Bermejo Barrera (2005). On History Considered as Epic Poetry. History and Theory 44 (2):182–194.
    This essay defines history as an interaction of three elements: description, evocation, and expression. These three elements should interact and combine without any of them overwhelming the remaining two. In combining the three elements, history carries on from epic poetry, which was its source. Highlighting the three elements reveals the ways history synthesizes the three historical stages outlined by Comte, namely, the theological, the metaphysical, and the scientific.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. D. N. Sedley (1998). Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is designed to appeal both to those interested in Roman poetry and to specialists in ancient philosophy. In it David Sedley explores Lucretius ' complex relationship with Greek culture, in particular with Empedocles, whose poetry was the model for his own, with Epicurus, the source of his philosophical inspiration, and with the Greek language itself. He includes a detailed reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature, and seeks to show how Lucretius worked with this as his (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Giovanni Gullace (ed.) (1981). Benedetto Croce, Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to its Criticism and History. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Benedetto Croce’s influence pervades Anglo-Saxon culture, but, ironically, before Giovanni Gullace heeded the call of his colleagues and provided this urgently needed translation of _La Poesia, _speakers of English had no access to Croce’s major work and final rendering of his esthetic theory.__ __ _Aesthetic, _published in 1902 and translated in 1909, represents most of what the English-speaking world knows about Croce’s theory. It is, asserts Gullace, “no more than a first sketch of a thought that developed, clarified, and corrected (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  20
    Seth Benardete (2000). The Argument of the Action: Essays on Greek Poetry and Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    This volume brings together Seth Benardete's studies of Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Iliad, and Greek tragedy, of eleven Platonic dialogues, and Aristotle's Metaphysics. These essays, some never before published, others difficult to find, span four decades of his work and document its impressive range. Benardete's philosophic reading of the poets and his poetic reading of the philosophers share a common ground that makes this collection a whole. The key, suggested by his reflections on Leo Strauss in the last piece, lies (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11.  2
    George F. Held (1995). Aristotle's Teleological Theory of Tragedy and Epic. Winter.
  12.  2
    N. Postlethwaite & W. G. Thalmann (1989). Conventions of Form and Thought in Early Greek Epic Poetry. Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:212.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  13.  7
    J. Tate (1955). Poetry and History A. W. Gomme: The Greek Attitude to Poetry and History. Pp. Vi+190. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press (Cambridge: University Press), 1954. Cloth, 28s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (3-4):254-256.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    Hugh Plommer (1976). The Ancient View of Greek Art J. J. Pollitt: The Ancient View of Greek Art: Criticism, History and Terminology. Pp. Xiv + 464. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1974. Cloth. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (02):250-252.
  15.  9
    M. L. West (1971). Greek Epic Poetry G. L. Huxley: Greek Epic Poetry From Eumelos to Panyassis. Pp. 213. London: Faber, 1969. Cloth, £2·50. The Classical Review 21 (01):67-69.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  6
    R. B. Rutherford (1987). Formulae and Literature William C. Thalmann: Conventions of Form and Thought in Early Greek Epic Poetry. Pp. Xxvi + 262. Baltimore, MD and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984. $27.50; £24.45. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (01):1-2.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  9
    Maria Michela Sassi (2013). Where Epistemology and Religion Meet What Do(Es) the God(s) Look Like? Rhizomata 1 (2):283-307.
    The focus of this essay is on Xenophanes’ criticism of anthropomorphic representation of the gods, famously sounding like a declaration of war against a constituent part of the Greek religion, and adopting terms and a tone that are unequalled amongst “pre-Socratic” authors for their directness and explicitness. While the main features of Xenophanes’ polemic are well known thanks to some of the most studied fragments of the pre-Socratic tradition, a different line of enquiry from the usual one is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Sarah Hitch (2014). Andersen, Haug Relative Chronology in Early Greek Epic Poetry. Pp. Xiv + 277, Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £60, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-19497-6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (1):9-12.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    Betty A. Sichel (1983). Correspondence and Contradiction in Ancient Greek Society and Education: Homer's Epic Poetry and Plato's Early Dialogues. Educational Theory 33 (2):49-59.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. A. H. Armstrong (1954). GOMME, The Greek Attitude to Poetry and History. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 53:201.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  15
    Clifford Andenberg (1983). Benedetto Croce: Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to Its Criticism and History. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Giovanni Gullace. Modern Schoolman 61 (1):56-57.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  10
    C. M. Bowra (1929). More New Chapters in Greek Literature New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature. Second Series. Some Recent Discoveries in Greek Poetry and Prose, Chiefly of the Fourth Century B.C. And Later Times. Edited by J. U. Powell and E. A. Barber. Pp. 232. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1929. Cloth, 15s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (05):181-183.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  4
    P. E. Easterling (1965). History and Criticism of Greek Texts B. A. Van Groningen: Traité d'Histoire Et de Critique des Textes Grecs. (Ver. Der K. Nederl. Akad. Van Wetenschappen, Afd. Letterkunde, Lxx. 2.) Pp. 128. Amsterdam: Noord-Hollandsche Uitgevers Maatschappij, 1963. Paper, Fl. 15. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 15 (01):75-77.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  4
    A. C. Pearson (1922). New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature. Recent Discoveries in Greek Poetry and Prose of the Fourth and Following Centuries, B.C. Edited by J. U. Powell and E. A. Barber. 8vo. Pp. Vii + 166. Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1921. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (7-8):170-172.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  6
    P. E. Easterling (1965). History and Criticism of Greek Texts. The Classical Review 15 (01):75-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    D. S. Robertson (1933). More New Chapters New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature. Third Series. Some Recent Discoveries in Greek Poetry and Prose of the Classical and Later Periods. Edited by J. U. Powell. Pp. 268; 17 Illustrations. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1933. Cloth, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (04):126-127.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  4
    J. U. Powell & E. A. Barber (1922). New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature: Recent Discoveries in Greek Poetry and Prose of the Fourth and Following Centuries B. C. Journal of Hellenic Studies 42:128.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  8
    Jennifer R. March (1995). Viewing Culture S. Goldhill, R. Osborne (Edd.): Art and Text in Ancient Greek Culture. (Cambridge Studies in New Art History and Criticism.) Pp. Xiii+341, 34 Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Cased, £40/$64.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (02):375-377.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  19
    Eric Alfred Havelock (1963). Preface to Plato. Cambridge, Belknap Press, Harvard University Press.
    The second part of the book discusses the Platonic Forms as an aspect of an increasingly rational culture.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   59 citations  
  30. Michael Naas (1995). Turning: From Persuasion to Philosophy: A Reading of Homer's Iliad. Humanities Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  3
    Grace M. Ledbetter (2002). Poetics Before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry. Princeton University Press.
    Combining literary and philosophical analysis, this study defends an utterly innovative reading of the early history of poetics. It is the first to argue that there is a distinctively Socratic view of poetry and the first to connect the Socratic view of poetry with earlier literary tradition.Literary theory is usually said to begin with Plato's famous critique of poetry in the Republic. Grace Ledbetter challenges this entrenched assumption by arguing that Plato's earlier dialogues Ion, Protagoras, and Apology introduce a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. William Fenn DeMoss (1920/1970). The Influence of Aristotle's Politics and Ethics on Spenser. New York,Ams Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Jochen Althoff (ed.) (2007). Philosophie Und Dichtung Im Antiken Griechenland: Akten der 7. Tagung der Karl Und Gertrud Abel-Stiftung Am 10. Und 11. Oktober 2002 in Bernkastel-Kues. [REVIEW] Steiner.
  34. Jochen Althoff (ed.) (2007). Philosophie Und Dichtung Im Antiken Griechenland: Akten der 7. Steiner.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Dorota Heck (2010). Four Dilemmas: Theory, Criticism, History, Faith: Sketches on the Threshold of Literary Anthropology. Księgarnia Akademicka.
    Dilemma one, Between the theoretical concepts and authorial intention -- Dilemma two, Good manners and eristic -- Dilemma three, Between strangeness and familiarity -- Dilemma four, Between scholarly research and faith.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  9
    Alexander Nikolaev (2013). The Aorist Infinitives in -EEIN in Early Greek Hexameter Poetry. Journal of Hellenic Studies 133:81-92.
    This paper examines the distribution of thematic infinitive endings in early Greek epic in the context of the long-standing debate about the transmission and development of Homeric epic diction. There are no aorist infinitives in - in Homer which would scan as -before a consonant or caesura (for example *). It is argued that this artificially ending - should be viewed as an actual analogical innovation of the poetic language, resulting from a proportional analogy to the futures. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Alice C. Hunsberger (ed.) (2012). Pearls of Persia: The Philosophical Poetry of Nāṣir-I Khusraw. In Association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies.
    Nasir-i Khusraw is a major literary figure in medieval Persian culture. He was a Muslim philosopher, poet, travel writer, and Ismaili da'i who lived a thousand years ago in the lands known today as Afghanistan, Iran, and Tajikistan. Although known in the West mainly for his Safarnama, or travelogue, which describes his seven-year journey from Khurasan, in the eastern Islamic lands, to Cairo, the city of the Fatimid imam-caliphs, his poetry and ideas are less familiar. Yet, over the centuries, Persian-speaking (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  12
    Martha Craven Nussbaum (2001). The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   162 citations  
  39.  1
    Amiel D. Vardi (1996). Diiudicatio Locorum: Gellius and the History of a Mode in Ancient Comparative Criticism. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):492-.
    Comparison of literary passages is a critical procedure much favoured by Gellius, and is the main theme in several chapters of his Noctes Atticae: ch. 2.23 is dedicated to a comparison of Menander's and Caecilius′ versions of the Plocium; 2.27 to a confrontation of passages from Demosthenes and Sallust; in 9.9 Vergilian verses are compared with their originals in Theocritus and Homer; parts of speeches by the elder Cato, C. Gracchus and Cicero are contrasted in 10.3; two of Vergil's verses (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  2
    Pilar García (2013). Poetry and History in Mezquina Memoria by Antonio Gil. Alpha (Osorno) 37:27-44.
    En el artículo proponemos que la novela Mezquina memoria del escritor Antonio Gil actualiza la compleja relación entre poesía e historia que instituye a La Araucana de Alonso de Ercilla como canto épico fundacional. Según esta propuesta de lectura, Mezquina memoria se configura a partir de una hipótesis que constantemente se frustra y que dice relación con la imposibilidad de construir un relato --unitario, un “gran relato”-- sobre la escritura de Ercilla como acto poético creador. De esta manera, la dimensión (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Anne Margaret Wright (2008). Philosophy and Writing. Sharpe Focus.
    Poetry -- Drama -- Philosophy -- History -- Fables, Novels, and Speeches.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  27
    William Allan (2006). Divine Justice and Cosmic Order in Early Greek Epic. Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:1-35.
    This article examines the ethical and theological universe of the Homeric epics, and shows that the patterns of human and divine justice which they deploy are also to be found throughout the wider corpus of early Greek hexameter poetry. Although most scholars continue to stress the differences between the Iliad and Odyssey with regard to divine justice, these come not (as is often alleged) from any change in the gods themselves but from the Odyssey's peculiar narrative structure, with its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  52
    Susan B. Levin (2001). The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited: Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    In this study, Levin explores Plato's engagement with the Greek literary tradition in his treatment of key linguistic issues. This investigation, conjoined with a new interpretation of the Republic's familiar critique of poets, supports the view that Plato's work represents a valuable precedent for contemporary reflections on ways in which philosophy might benefit from appeals to literature.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  7
    Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  4
    Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. David Simpson (1988). Literary Criticism and the Return to "History". Critical Inquiry 14 (4):721-747.
    If any emergent historical criticism will tend by its own choice toward inclusiveness and eclecticism, it is also likely to be constrained by more subtle forms of complicity with the theoretical subculture within which it seeks its audience. It is not in principle impossible that we might choose to set going an initiative that is very different indeed from the methods and approaches already in place. But is nonetheless clear that we must be aware, in some propaedeutic way, of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. George Thomson (1935). Two Notes on Greek Poetry. Classical Quarterly 29 (01):37-.
    In an interesting paper read some time ago to the Cambridge Philological Society , H. J. M. Milne analysed the first Ode of Sappho and showed that it is constructed according to those principles of poetical form which we should expect to find in the work of so delicate a Greek artist. If more of these lyrics had survived in their entirety, the task of expounding the technique of Greek poetry would be simpler than it is, because naturally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  11
    Jeroen Mettes (2012). Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30. Continent 2 (1):29-35.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    James E. G. Zetzel (1983). Re-Creating the Canon: Augustan Poetry and the Alexandrian Past. Critical Inquiry 10 (1):83.
    The Alexandrian emphasis on smallness, elegance, and slightness at the expense of grand themes in major poetic genres was not preciosity for its own sake: although the poetry was written by and for scholars, it had much larger sources than the bibliothecal context in which it was composed. Since the time of the classical poets, much had changed. Earlier Greek poetry was an intimate part of the life of the city-state, written for its religious occasions and performed by its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  1
    Richard McKeon (1975). Arts of Invention and Arts of Memory: Creation and Criticism. Critical Inquiry 1 (4):723-739.
    The arts of poetry and the arts of criticism are uncovered and studied in their products, in poems and in judgments. Poetry and criticism, however, the making and judging of poems, are processes. The study of literature as a product - existing poems and existing interpretations and appreciations of poetry - develops a body of knowledge which is sometimes called "poetic sciences." The recognition and use of poetic and critical processes - producing and judging poems which did not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000