Search results for 'Epicureans (Greek philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    A. A. Long (1986). Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics. University of California Press.
    The purpose of this book is to trace the main developments in Greek philosophy during the period which runs from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.c. to the end of the Roman Republic. These three centuries, known to us as the Hellenistic Age, witnessed a vast expansion of Greek civilization eastwards, following Alexander's conquests; and later, Greek civilization penetrated deeply into the western Mediterranean world assisted by the political conquerors of Greece, the Romans. But philosophy (...)
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  2.  96
    R. W. Sharples (1996). Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics: An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy. Routledge.
    The Hellenistic philosophers and schools of philosophy are emerging from the shadow of Plato and Aristotle and are increasingly studied for their intrinsic philosophical value. They are not only interesting in their own right, but also form the intellectual background of the late Roman Republic. This study gives a comprehensive and readable account of the principal doctrines of the Stoics, Epicureans and various sceptical traditions from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to around 200 A.D. (...)
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  3. John P. Anton & George L. Kustas (eds.) (2004). Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy I. State University of New York Press.
    The essays in this volume treat a wide variety of fundamental topics and problems in ancient Greek philosophy. The scope of the section on pre-Socratic thought ranges over the views which these thinkers have on such areas of concern as religion, natural philosophy and science, cosmic periods, the nature of elements, theory of names, the concept of plurality, and the philosophy of mind. The essays dealing with the Platonic dialogues examine with unusual care a great number of (...)
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  4. Daniel M. Klein (2012). Travels with Epicurus: A Journey to a Greek Island in Search of a Fulfilled Life. Penguin Books.
    Table at Dimitri's Taverna : on seeking a philosophy of old age -- Old Greek's olive trees : on Epicurus's philosophy of fulfillment -- Deserted terrace : on time and worry beads -- Tasso's rain-spattered photographs : on solitary reflection -- Sirocco of youth's beauty : on existential authenticity -- Tintinnabulation of sheep bells : on mellowing to metaphysics -- Iphigenia's guest : on stoicism and old old age -- Burning boat in Kamini Harbor : on the timeliness (...)
     
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  5.  1
    A. A. Long (1974). Hellenistic Philosophy. New York,Scribner.
  6. Eduard Zeller (1962). The Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics. New York, Russell & Russell.
  7.  11
    Richard Sorabji (2014). Philosophy and Life in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy: Three Aspects. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:45-74.
    Philosophy, in the ancient Graeco-Roman world, and in various other cultures too, was typically thought of as, among other things, bearing on how to live. Questions of how to live may now be considered by some as merely one optional specialism among others, but Derek Parfit for one, we shall see, rightly treats implications for how to live as flowing naturally from metaphysical theories. In the hope of showing something about the ancient Graeco-Roman tradition as a whole, I shall (...)
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  8. Raymond A. Belliotti (2009). Roman Philosophy and the Good Life. Lexington Books.
    Introduction: The philosophical schools -- The skeptical academy : Cicero -- Stoicism I : Cato -- Epicureanism : Lucretius, Caesar, and Cassius -- The Ides of March -- Stoicism II : Seneca, Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius -- Appendices.
     
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  9. John Cottingham (2010). Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can philosophy enable us to lead better lives through a systematic understanding of our human nature? John Cottingham's thought-provoking 1998 study examines the contrasting approaches to this problem found in three major phases of Western philosophy. Starting with the attempts of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics and Epicureans to cope with the recalcitrant forces of the passions, he moves on to examine the fascinating and hitherto little-studied moral psychology of Descartes, and his effort to integrate the physical (...)
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  10. John Cottingham (2011). Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can philosophy enable us to lead better lives through a systematic understanding of our human nature? John Cottingham's thought-provoking 1998 study examines the contrasting approaches to this problem found in three major phases of Western philosophy. Starting with the attempts of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics and Epicureans to cope with the recalcitrant forces of the passions, he moves on to examine the fascinating and hitherto little-studied moral psychology of Descartes, and his effort to integrate the physical (...)
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  11. John Cottingham (1998). Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can philosophy enable us to lead better lives through a systematic understanding of our human nature? John Cottingham's thought-provoking 1998 study examines the contrasting approaches to this problem found in three major phases of Western philosophy. Starting with the attempts of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics and Epicureans to cope with the recalcitrant forces of the passions, he moves on to examine the fascinating and hitherto little-studied moral psychology of Descartes, and his effort to integrate the physical (...)
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  12.  68
    Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and (...)
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  13.  56
    James Warren (2004). Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. Clarendon Press.
    The ancient philosophical school of Epicureanism tried to argue that death is "nothing to us." Were they right? James Warren provides a comprehensive study and articulation of the interlocking arguments against the fear of death found not only in the writings of Epicurus himself, but also in Lucretius' poem De rerum natura and in Philodemus' work De morte. These arguments are central to the Epicurean project of providing ataraxia (freedom from anxiety) and therefore central to an understanding of Epicureanism as (...)
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  14. Tim O'Keefe (2010). Epicureanism. Acumen Pub. Ltd..
    Introduction: The life of Epicurus and the history of epicureanism -- Part I: Metaphysics and physics -- Atoms and void -- Atomic motion -- Sensible qualities -- Cosmology -- Biology and language -- The mind -- Freedom and determinism -- Part II: Epistemology -- Skepticism -- The canon -- Part III: Ethics -- Pleasure, the highest good -- Varieties of pleasure, varieties of desire -- The virtues and philosophy -- Justice -- Friendship -- The gods -- Death.
     
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  15.  30
    Neven Leddy & Avi Lifschitz (eds.) (2009). Epicurus in the Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.
    Eighteenth-century Epicureanism is often viewed as radical, anti-religious, and politically dangerous. But to what extent does this simplify the ancient philosophy and underestimate its significance to the Enlightenment? Through a pan-European analysis of Enlightenment centres from Scotland to Russia via the Netherlands, France and Germany, contributors argue that elements of classical Epicureanism were appropriated by radical and conservative writers alike. They move beyond literature and political theory to examine the application of Epicurean ideas in domains as diverse as physics, (...)
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  16.  13
    James Warren (ed.) (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
    The volume emphasises the interrelation of the different areas of the Epicureans' philosophical interests while also drawing attention to points of interpretative difficulty and controversy.
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  17. David Keyt & Miller Jr (eds.) (2007). Freedom, Reason, and the Polis: Volume 24, Part 2: Essays in Ancient Greek Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the nature of law? Does our obligation to obey the law extend to unjust laws? From what source do lawmakers derive legitimate authority? What principles should guide us in the design of political institutions? The essays in this collection, written by prominent contemporary philosophers, explore how these questions were addressed by ancient political thinkers, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics and Epicureans. Classical theories of human nature and their implications for political theory are examined, as (...)
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  18. David Keyt & Miller Jr (eds.) (2015). Freedom, Reason, and the Polis: Volume 24, Part 2: Essays in Ancient Greek Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the nature of law? Does our obligation to obey the law extend to unjust laws? From what source do lawmakers derive legitimate authority? What principles should guide us in the design of political institutions? The essays in this collection, written by prominent contemporary philosophers, explore how these questions were addressed by ancient political thinkers, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics and Epicureans. Classical theories of human nature and their implications for political theory are examined, as (...)
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  19. Y. Benferhat (2005). Ciues Epicurei: Les Épicuriens Et l'Idée de Monarchie à Rome Et En Italie de Sylla à Octave. Editions Latomus.
  20. Gustavo Costa (2012). Epicureismo E Pederastia: Il "Lucrezio" E l'"Anacreonte" di Alessandro Marchetti Secondo Il Sant'uffizio. L.S. Olschki.
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  21. Epicurus (2012). The Art of Happiness. Penguin Books.
  22. J. C. A. Gaskin (ed.) (1995). The Epicurean Philosophers. C.E. Tuttle.
     
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  23. Nicholas Hill (2007). Philosophia Epicuraea Democritiana Theophrastica. Fabrizio Serra Editore.
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  24. Rafal Krazek (2011). Montaigne Et la Philosophie du Plaisir: Pour Une Lecture Épicurienne des Essais. Classiques Garnier.
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  25. Giovanni Indelli & Voula Tsouna-McKirahan (eds.) (1995). Philodemus: On Choices and Avoidances. Bibliopolis.
     
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  26.  95
    Gisela Striker (ed.) (1974/1996). Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The doctrines of the Hellenistic Schools - Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics - are known to have had a formative influence on later thought, but because the primary sources are lost, they have to be reconstructed from later reports. This important collection of essays by one of the foremost interpreters of Hellenistic philosophy focuses on key questions in epistemology and ethics debated by Greek and Roman philosophers of the Hellenistic period. There is currently a new awareness of the great (...)
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  27. Karsten Friis Johansen (1999). A History of Ancient Philosophy: From the Beginning to Augustine. Routledge.
    Translated by Henrik Rosenmeier, A History of Ancient Philosophy charts the origins and development of ancient philosophical thought. For easy reference, the book is divided chronologically into six main parts. The sections are further divided into philosophers and philosophical movements: *Pre-Socratic Philosophy, including mythology, the Pythagoreans and Parmenides *The Great Century of Athens, including the Sophists and Socrates *Plato, including The Republic, The Symposium and The Timaeus *Aristotle, including The Physics, The Metaphysics and The Poetics *Hellenistic (...)
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  28.  23
    Cyril Bailey (1928). Karl Marx on Greek Atomism. Classical Quarterly 22 (3-4):205-.
    The first volume of the collected works of Karl Marx, which is being issued by the Marx-Engels Institute of Moscow, opens with a dissertation entitled ‘Über die Differenz der demokritischen und epikureischen Naturphilosophie’, which he presented for his doctorate at the University of Jena in 1841. It is interesting to find one who was afterwards to win fame in very different fields starting his career with an enthusiastic tract on Greekphilosophy, which he evidently intended to make his work for years (...)
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  29.  47
    Kathleen Wider (1986). Women Philosophers in the Ancient Greek World: Donning the Mantle. Hypatia 1 (1):21 - 62.
    This paper argues that there were women involved with philosophy on a fairly constant basis throughout Greek antiquity. It does so by tracing the lives and where extant the writings of these women. However, since the sources, both ancient and modern, from which we derive our knowledge about these women are so sexist and easily distort our view of these women and their accomplishments, the paper also discusses the manner in which their histories come down to us as well (...)
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  30. R. J. Hankinson (2001). Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'A fascinating book. It contains a sweeping survey of approaches to causation and explanation from the Presocratic philosophers to the Neo-platonist philosophers. Hankinson pays a visit to every major figure and movement in between: the sophists, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Sceptics, the Epicureans and a variety of medical writers, early and late... impressive... Hankinson's observations are regularly intriguing, at times refreshingly trenchant, and in some cases straightforwardly arresting... the history itself is excellent: clear, intelligently conceived and executed, and (...)
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  31. Karsten Friis Johansen (2005). A History of Ancient Philosophy: From the Beginning to Augustine. Routledge.
    Translated by Henrik Rosenmeier, _A History of Ancient Philosophy_ charts the origins and development of ancient philosophical thought. For easy reference, the book is divided chronologically into six main parts. The sections are further divided into philosophers and philosophical movements: *Pre-Socratic Philosophy, including mythology, the Pythagoreans and Parmenides *The Great Century of Athens, including the Sophists and Socrates *Plato, including The Republic, The Symposium and The Timaeus *Aristotle, including The Physics, The Metaphysics and The Poetics *Hellenistic Philosophy, including (...)
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  32. Karsten Friis Johansen (2012). A History of Ancient Philosophy: From the Beginning to Augustine. Routledge.
    Translated by Henrik Rosenmeier, _A History of Ancient Philosophy_ charts the origins and development of ancient philosophical thought. For easy reference, the book is divided chronologically into six main parts. The sections are further divided into philosophers and philosophical movements: *Pre-Socratic Philosophy, including mythology, the Pythagoreans and Parmenides *The Great Century of Athens, including the Sophists and Socrates *Plato, including The Republic, The Symposium and The Timaeus *Aristotle, including The Physics, The Metaphysics and The Poetics *Hellenistic Philosophy, including (...)
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  33. Stephen Salkever (ed.) (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought provides a guide to understanding the central texts and problems in ancient Greek political thought, from Homer through the Stoics and Epicureans. Composed of essays specially commissioned for this volume and written by leading scholars of classics, political science, and philosophy, the Companion brings these texts to life by analysing what they have to tell us about the problems of political life. Focusing on texts by Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, and (...)
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  34. Stephen Salkever (ed.) (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought provides a guide to understanding the central texts and problems in ancient Greek political thought, from Homer through the Stoics and Epicureans. Composed of essays specially commissioned for this volume and written by leading scholars of classics, political science, and philosophy, the Companion brings these texts to life by analysing what they have to tell us about the problems of political life. Focusing on texts by Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, and (...)
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  35. Cicero (1997). The Nature of the Gods. Clarendon Press.
    Cicero's philosophical works are now exciting renewed interest and more generous appreciation, in part because he provides vital evidence of the views of the (largely lost) Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic age, and partly because of the light he casts on the intellectual life of first-century Rome. Hellenistic philosophy has in recent years atrracted growing interest from academic philosophers in Europe and North America. The Nature of the Gods is a document of central significance in this area, for it (...)
     
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  36.  18
    R. Kamtekar (2007). Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. Philosophical Review 116 (4):650-653.
    James Warren, Facing Death, <span class='Hi'>Epicurus</span> and his Critics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Pp. viii, 240. ISBN 0-19-925289-0. $45.00. Reviewed by Thornton Lockwood, Sacred Heart University (tlockwood@verizon.net) Word count: 2152 words ------------------------------- To modern ears, the word Epicurean indicates (if anything) an interest in fine dining. But at least throughout the early modern period up until the 19th century, Epicureanism was known less for its relation to food preparation and more so, if not scandalously so, for its doctrine about the (...)
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  37. Margaret R. Graver (ed.) (2002). Cicero on the Emotions: Tusculan Disputations 3 and 4. University of Chicago Press.
    The third and fourth books of Cicero's _Tusculan Disputations_ deal with the nature and management of human emotion: first grief, then the emotions in general. In lively and accessible style, Cicero presents the insights of Greek philosophers on the subject, reporting the views of Epicureans and Peripatetics and giving a detailed account of the Stoic position, which he himself favors for its close reasoning and moral earnestness. Both the specialist and the general reader will be fascinated by the Stoics' (...)
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  38. P. G. Walsh (ed.) (1997). The Nature of the Gods. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Cicero's philosophical works are now exciting renewed interest and more generous appreciation, in part because he provides vital evidence of the views of the Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic age, and partly because of the light he casts on the intellectual life of first-century Rome. Hellenistic philosophy has in recent years atrracted growing interest from academic philosophers in Europe and North America. The Nature of the Gods is a document of central significance in this area, for it presents a (...)
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