Search results for 'Episodic memory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Imagining the Past: On the Nature of Episodic Memory. In Fiona MacPherson Fabian Dorsch (ed.), Memory and Imagination. OUP.score: 246.0
    What kind of mental state is episodic memory? I defend the claim that it is, in key part, imagining the past, where the imagining in question is experiential imagining. To remember a past episode is to experientially imagine how things were, in a way controlled by one’s past experience of that episode. Call this the Inclusion View. I motive this view by appeal both to patterns of compatibilities and incompatibilities between various states, and to phenomenology. The bulk of (...)
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  2. James Genone (2006). Concepts and Imagery in Episodic Memory. Anthropology and Philosophy 7 (1/2):95-107.score: 240.0
    The relationship between perceptual experience and memory can seem to pose a chal- lenge for conceptualism, the thesis that perceptual experiences require the actualization of conceptual capacities. Since subjects can recall features of past experiences for which they lacked corresponding concepts at the time of the original experience, it would seem that a subject’s conceptual capacities do not impose a limit on what he or she can experience perceptually. But this conclusion ignores the fact that concepts can be composed (...)
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  3. John M. Gardiner (2002). Episodic Memory and Autonoetic Consciousness: A First-Person Approach. In Alan Baddeley, John P. Aggleton & Martin A. Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press. 11-30.score: 240.0
  4. Robert Hopkins (2014). Episodic Memory as Representing the Past to Oneself. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):313-331.score: 240.0
    Episodic memory is sometimes described as mental time travel. This suggests three ideas: that episodic memory offers us access to the past that is quasi-experiential, that it is a source of knowledge of the past, and that it is, at root, passive. I offer an account of episodic memory that rejects all three ideas. The account claims that remembering is a matter of representing the past to oneself, in a way suitably responsive to how (...)
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  5. Béatrice Desgranges Alexandre Bejanin, Armelle Viard, Gaël Chételat, David Clarys, Frédéric Bernard, Alice Pélerin, Vincent de La Sayette, Francis Eustache (2012). When Higher Activations Reflect Lower Deactivations: A PET Study in Alzheimer's Disease During Encoding and Retrieval in Episodic Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    The aim of the present study was to explore the cerebral substrates of episodic memory disorders in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and investigate patients' hyperactivations frequently reported in the functional imaging literature. It remains unclear whether some of these hyperactivations reflect compensatory mechanisms or deactivation disturbances in the default mode network. Using positron emission tomography (15O-H2O), cerebral blood flow was measured in eleven ADs and twelve healthy elderly controls at rest and during encoding and stem-cued recall of verbal items. (...)
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  6. Alexandre Bejanin, Armelle Viard, Gaël Chételat, David Clarys, Frédéric Bernard, Alice Pélerin, Vincent de La Sayette, Francis Eustache & Béatrice Desgranges (2012). When Higher Activations Reflect Lower Deactivations: A PET Study in Alzheimer's Disease During Encoding and Retrieval in Episodic Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    The aim of the present study was to explore the cerebral substrates of episodic memory disorders in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and investigate patients' hyperactivations frequently reported in the functional imaging literature. It remains unclear whether some of these hyperactivations reflect compensatory mechanisms or deactivation disturbances in the default mode network. Using positron emission tomography (15O-H2O), cerebral blood flow was measured in eleven ADs and twelve healthy elderly controls at rest and during encoding and stem-cued recall of verbal items. (...)
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  7. Lars Bäckman Beata Ferencz, Erika J. Laukka, Martin Lövdén, Grégoria Kalpouzos, Lina Keller, Caroline Graff, Lars-Olof Wahlund, Laura Fratiglioni (2013). The Influence of APOE and TOMM40 Polymorphisms on Hippocampal Volume and Episodic Memory in Old Age. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 (TOMM40) may be influential in this regard by influencing mitochondrial neurotoxicity. Little is known about the influence of the TOMM40 gene on hippocampal (HC) volume and episodic memory (EM), particularly in healthy older adults. Thus, we sought to discern the influence of TOMM40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which have previously been associated with medial temporal lobe integrity (rs11556505 and rs2075650), on HC (...)
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  8. R. Shayna Rosenbaum Jennifer S. Rabin, Nicole Carson, Asaf Gilboa, Donald T. Stuss (2012). Imagining Other People's Experiences in a Person with Impaired Episodic Memory: The Role of Personal Familiarity. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Difficulties remembering one’s own experiences via episodic memory may affect the ability to imagine other people’s experiences during theory of mind (ToM). Previous work shows that the same set of brain regions recruited during tests of episodic memory and future imagining are also engaged during standard laboratory tests of ToM. However, hippocampal amnesic patients who show deficits in past and future thinking, show intact performance on ToM tests, which involve unknown people or fictional characters. Here we (...)
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  9. Charles DeCarli Samuel N. Lockhart, Adriane B. V. Mayda, Alexandra E. Roach, Evan Fletcher, Owen Carmichael, Pauline Maillard, Christopher G. Schwarz, Andrew P. Yonelinas, Charan Ranganath (2012). Episodic Memory Function is Associated with Multiple Measures of White Matter Integrity in Cognitive Aging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Previous neuroimaging research indicates that white matter injury and integrity, measured respectively by white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from diffusion tensor imaging, differ with aging and cerebrovascular disease and are associated with episodic memory deficits in cognitively normal older adults. However, knowledge about tract-specific relationships between WMH, FA, and episodic memory in aging remains limited. We hypothesized that white matter connections between frontal cortex and subcortical structures as well as connections between frontal (...)
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  10. Radek Ptak, Martial Van Der Linden & Armin Schnider (2010). Cognitive Rehabilitation of Episodic Memory Disorders: From Theory to Practice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 216.0
    Memory disorders are among the most frequent and most debilitating cognitive impairments following acquired brain damage. Cognitive remediation strategies attempt to restore lost memory capacity, provide compensatory techniques or teach the use of external memory aids. Memory rehabilitation has strongly been influenced by memory theory, and the interaction between both has stimulated the development of techniques such as spaced retrieval, vanishing cues or errorless learning. These techniques partly rely on implicit memory and therefore enable (...)
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  11. Mark A. Wheeler (2000). Episodic Memory and Autonoetic Awareness. In Endel Tulving & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press. 597-608.score: 216.0
  12. Haline E. Schendan Giorgio Ganis (2012). Concealed Semantic and Episodic Autobiographical Memory Electrified. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 210.0
    Electrophysiology-based concealed information tests (CIT) try to determine whether somebody possesses concealed information about a probe item by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) between this item and comparison items (irrelevants). Although the broader field is sometimes referred to as “memory detection”, little attention has been paid to the precise type of underlying memory involved. This study begins addressing this issue by examining the key distinction between semantic and episodic memory in the autobiographical domain within a CIT paradigm. (...)
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  13. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2013). Conscious Experience and Episodic Memory: Hippocampus at the Crossroads. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 210.0
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  14. Endel Tulving (1984). Précis of Elements of Episodic Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):223.score: 210.0
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  15. Neil Dagnall Andrew Parker, Adam Parkin (2013). Effects of Saccadic Bilateral Eye Movements on Episodic and Semantic Autobiographical Memory Fluency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
    Performing a sequence of fast saccadic horizontal eye movements has been shown to facilitate performance on a range of cognitive tasks, including the retrieval of episodic memories. One explanation for these effects is based on the hypothesis that saccadic eye movements increase hemispheric interaction, and that such interactions are important for particular types of memory. The aim of the current research was to assess the effect of horizontal saccadic eye movements on the retrieval of both episodic autobiographical (...)
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  16. Endel Tulving (2005). Episodic Memory and Autonoesis: Uniquely Human? In Herbert S. Terrace & Janet Metcalfe (eds.), The Missing Link in Cognition: Origins of Self-Reflective Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 3-56.score: 210.0
  17. Stan Klein (2013). Making the Case That Episodic Recollection is Attributable to Operations Occurring at Retrieval Rather Than to Content Stored in a Dedicated Subsystem of Long-Term Memory. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7 (3):1-14.score: 198.0
    Episodic memory often is conceptualized as a uniquely human system of long-term memory that makes available knowledge accompanied by the temporal and spatial context in which that knowledge was acquired. Retrieval from episodic memory entails a form of first–person subjectivity called autonoetic consciousness that provides a sense that a recollection was something that took place in the experiencer’s personal past. In this paper I expand on this definition of episodic memory. Specifically, I suggest (...)
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  18. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampal–Anterior Thalamic Axis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.score: 192.0
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other recent models in (...)
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  19. Rocco J. Gennaro (1992). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and Episodic Memory. Philosophical Psychology 5 (4):333-47.score: 192.0
    My aim in this paper is to show that consciousness entails self-consciousness by focusing on the relationship between consciousness and memory. More specifically, I addreess the following questions: (1) does consciousness require episodic memory?; and (2) does episodic memory require self-consciousness? With the aid of some Kantian considerations and recent empirical data, it is argued that consciousness does require episodic memory. This is done after defining episodic memory and distinguishing it from (...)
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  20. Florin Dolcos, Alexandru D. Iordan, James Kragel, Jared Stokes, Ryan Campbell, Gregory McCarthy & Roberto Cabeza (2013). Neural Correlates of Opposing Effects of Emotional Distraction on Working Memory and Episodic Memory: An Event-Related fMRI Investigation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 192.0
    A fundamental question in the emotional memory literature is why emotion enhances memory in some conditions but disrupts memory in other conditions. For example, separate studies have shown that emotional stimuli tend to be better remembered in long-term episodic memory (EM), whereas emotional distracters tend to impair working memory (WM) maintenance. The first goal of this study was to directly compare the neural correlates of EM enhancement (EME) and WM impairing (WMI) effects, and the (...)
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  21. John H. Mace (2006). Episodic Remembering Creates Access to Involuntary Conscious Memory: Demonstrating Involuntary Recall on a Voluntary Recall Task. Memory 14 (8):917-924.score: 186.0
  22. Christoph Hoerl (2007). Episodic Memory, Autobiographical Memory, Narrative: On Three Key Notions in Current Approaches to Memory Development. Philosophical Psychology 20 (5):621 – 640.score: 180.0
    According to recent social interactionist accounts in developmental psychology, a child's learning to talk about the past with others plays a key role in memory development. Most accounts of this kind are centered on the theoretical notion of autobiographical memory and assume that socio-communicative interaction with others is important, in particular, in explaining the emergence of memories that have a particular type of connection to the self. Most of these accounts also construe autobiographical memory as a species (...)
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  23. William J. Friedman (2007). The Meaning of “Time” in Episodic Memory and Mental Time Travel. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):323-323.score: 180.0
    The role of time in episodic memory and mental time travel is considered in light of findings on humans' temporal memory and anticipation. Time is not integral or uniform in memory for the past or anticipation of the future. The commonalities of episodic memory and anticipation require further study.
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  24. James Russell & Robert Hanna (2012). A Minimalist Approach to the Development of Episodic Memory. Mind and Language 27 (1):29-54.score: 180.0
    Episodic memory is usually regarded in a Conceptualist light, in the sense of its being dependent upon the grasp of concepts directly relevant to the act of episodic recollection itself, such as a concept of past times and of the self as an experiencer. Given this view, its development is typically timed as being in the early school-age years (Perner, 2001; Tulving, 2005). We present a minimalist, Non-Conceptualist approach in opposition to this view, but one that also (...)
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  25. Endel Tulving (1985). Elements of Episodic Memory. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    Elements of Episodic Memory was a seminal text in the memory literature, highly cited and influential. It has been unavailable for some years, but is now back in print as in its original form, with this reissue. -/- The book examines the critical role that retrieval processes play in remembering. It proposes that the nature of recollective experience is determined by the interaction between the 'episodic' trace information and the 'semantic' retrieval information. This basic theme is (...)
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  26. Jérôme Dokic (2014). Feeling the Past: A Two-Tiered Account of Episodic Memory. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):413-426.score: 180.0
    Episodic memory involves the sense that it is “first-hand”, i.e., originates directly from one’s own past experience. An account of this phenomenological dimension is offered in terms of an affective experience or feeling specific to episodic memory. On the basis of recent empirical research in the domain of metamemory, it is claimed that a recollective experience involves two separate mental components: a first-order memory about the past along with a metacognitive, episodic feeling of knowing. (...)
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  27. Jonathan K. Foster (2001). Cantor Coding and Chaotic Itinerancy: Relevance for Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampus? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):815-816.score: 180.0
    This commentary provides a critique of Tsuda's target article, focusing on the hippocampus and episodic long-term memory. More specifically, the relevance of Cantor coding and chaotic itinerancy for long-term memory functioning is considered, given what we know about the involvement of the hippocampus in the mediation of long-term episodic memory (based on empirical neuroimaging studies and investigations of brain-damaged amnesic patients).
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  28. Kim S. Graham & John R. Hodges (1999). Episodic Memory in Semantic Dementia: Implications for the Roles Played by the Perirhinal and Hippocampal Memory Systems in New Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):452-453.score: 180.0
    Aggleton & Brown (A&B) propose that the hippocampal-anterior thalamic and perirhinal-medial dorsal thalamic systems play independent roles in episodic memory, with the hippocampus supporting recollection-based memory and the perirhinal cortex, recognition memory. In this commentary we discuss whether there is experimental support for the A&B model from studies of long-term memory in semantic dementia.
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  29. James A. Bednar (2000). Internally-Generated Activity, Non-Episodic Memory, and Emotional Salience in Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):908-909.score: 180.0
    (1) Substituting (as Solms does) forebrain for brainstem in the search for a dream “controller” is counterproductive, since a distributed system need have no single controller. (2) Evidence against episodic memory consolidation does not show that REM sleep has no role in other types of memory, contra Vertes & Eastman. (3) A generalization of Revonsuo's “threat simulation” model in reverse is more plausible and is empirically testable. [Hobson et al.; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
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  30. James Russell (2014). Episodic Memory as Re-Experiential Memory: Kantian, Developmental, and Neuroscientific Currents. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):391-411.score: 180.0
    Recent work on the early development of episodic memory in my laboratory has been fuelled by the following assumption: if episodic memory is re-experiential memory then Kant’s analysis of the spatiotemporal nature of experience should constrain and positively influence theories of episodic memory development. The idea is that re-experiential memory will “inherit” these spatiotemporal features. On the basis of this assumption, Russell and Hanna (Mind and Language 27(1):29–54, 2012) proposed that (a) the (...)
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  31. Thomas Suddendorf (2010). Episodic Memory Versus Episodic Foresight: Similarities and Differences. Cognitive Science 1 (1):99-107.score: 180.0
    There are logical and empirical grounds that link episodic memory and the ability to imagine future events. In some sense, both episodic memory and episodic foresight may be regarded as two sides of the same capacity to travel mentally in time. After reviewing some of the recent evidence for commonalities, I discuss limits of these parallels. There are fundamental differences between thinking about past and future events that need to be kept in clear view if (...)
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  32. John P. Aggleton & John M. Pearce (2002). Neural Systems Underlying Episodic Memory: Insights From Animal Research. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  33. Alan Baddeley, John P. Aggleton & Martin A. Conway (eds.) (2002). Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.score: 180.0
    The term 'episodic memory' refers to our memory for unique, personal experiences, that we can date at some point in our past - our first day at school, the day we got married. It has again become a topic of great importance and interest to psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers. How are such memories stored in the brain, why do certain memories disappear (especially those from early in childhood), what causes false memories (memories of events we erroneously believe (...)
     
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  34. Alan Baddeley (2002). The Concept of Episodic Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  35. Martin A. Conway (2002). Sensory-Perceptual Episodic Memory and its Context: Autobiographical Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  36. John R. Hodges & Kim S. Graham (2002). Episodic Memory: Insights From Semantic Dementia. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  37. Teresa McCormack & Christoph Hoerl (2001). The Child in Time: Temporal Concepts and Self-Consciousness in the Development of Episodic Memory. In C. Moore & Karen Lemmon (eds.), The Self in Time: Developmental Perspectives. Erlbaum. 203.score: 180.0
    Investigates the roles of temporal concepts and self-consciousness in the development of episodic memory. According to some theorists, types of long-term memory differ primarily in the degree to which they involve or are associated with self-consciousness (although there may be no substantial differences in the kind of event information that they deliver). However, a known difficulty with this view is that it is not obvious what motivates introducing self-consciousness as the decisive factor in distinguishing between types of (...)
     
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  38. Andrew R. Mayes & Neil Roberts (2002). Theories of Episodic Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  39. Endel Tulving (2002). Episodic Memory and Common Sense: How Far Apart? In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  40. Andrew P. Yonelinas (2002). Components of Episodic Memory: The Contribution of Recollection and Familiarity. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.score: 180.0
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  41. Felipe De Brigard (2013). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.score: 174.0
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather (...)
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  42. Stan Klein (forthcoming). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology.score: 168.0
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question "how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?" This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I (...)
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  43. Teresa McCormack (1999). Temporal Concepts and Episodic Memory: A Response to Hoerl. Mind and Language 14 (2):252-262.score: 162.0
  44. D. Hassabis & E. A. Maguire (2007). Deconstructing Episodic Memory with Construction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):299-306.score: 162.0
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  45. Lynn Nadel, Lee Ryan, Katrina Keil & Karen Putnam (1999). Episodic Memory: It's About Time (and Space). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):463-464.score: 156.0
    Aggleton & Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes (...)
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  46. Jan Bures & Andre A. Fenton (1999). The Gap Between Episodic Memory and Experiment: Can C-Fos Expression Replace Recognition Testing? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):445-446.score: 156.0
    The effort to identify the neural substrate of episodic recall, though ambitious, lacks experimental support. By considering the data on c-fos activation by novel and familiar stimuli in recognition studies, we illustrate how inadequate experimental designs permit alternative interpretations. We stress that interpretation of c-fos expression changes should be supported by adequate recognition tests.
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  47. Petter Marklund & Lars Nyberg (2007). Intersecting the Divide Between Working Memory and Episodic Memory: Evidence From Sustained and Transient Brain Activity Patterns. In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. Oup Oxford. 305--332.score: 156.0
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  48. Stanley B. Klein (2014). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):427-447.score: 156.0
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question “how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?” This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I (...)
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  49. Brent J. Small & Backman & Lars (2006). Episodic Memory Impairment in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.score: 156.0
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  50. Fergus Im Craik & Larry L. Jacoby (1979). Elaboration and Distinctiveness in Episodic Memory. In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research.score: 156.0
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