Search results for 'Episodic memory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Imagining the Past: On the Nature of Episodic Memory. In Fiona MacPherson Fabian Dorsch (ed.), Memory and Imagination. OUP
    What kind of mental state is episodic memory? I defend the claim that it is, in key part, imagining the past, where the imagining in question is experiential imagining. To remember a past episode is to experientially imagine how things were, in a way controlled by one’s past experience of that episode. Call this the Inclusion View. I motive this view by appeal both to patterns of compatibilities and incompatibilities between various states, and to phenomenology. The bulk of (...)
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  2. Stan Klein (2016). Autonoetic Consciousness: Re-Considering the Role of Episodic Memory in Future-Oriented Self-Projection. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (2):381-401.
    Following the seminal work of Ingvar (1985. “Memory for the future”: An essay on the temporal organization of conscious awareness. Human Neurobiology, 4, 127–136), Suddendorf (1994. The discovery of the fourth dimension: Mental time travel and human evolution. Master’s thesis. University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand), and Tulving (1985. Memory and consciousness. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie Canadienne, 26, 1–12), exploration of the ability to anticipate and prepare for future contingencies that cannot be known with certainty has grown into a thriving (...)
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  3. Endel Tulving (1985). Elements of Episodic Memory. OUP Oxford.
    Elements of Episodic Memory is a classic text in the psychology literature. It had a significant influence on research in the area has been much sought after in recent years. Finally, it has now been made available again with this reissue, the text unchanged from the original.
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  4.  72
    John M. Gardiner (2002). Episodic Memory and Autonoetic Consciousness: A First-Person Approach. In Alan Baddeley, John P. Aggleton & Martin A. Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press 11-30.
  5. Robert Hopkins (2014). Episodic Memory as Representing the Past to Oneself. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):313-331.
    Episodic memory is sometimes described as mental time travel. This suggests three ideas: that episodic memory offers us access to the past that is quasi-experiential, that it is a source of knowledge of the past, and that it is, at root, passive. I offer an account of episodic memory that rejects all three ideas. The account claims that remembering is a matter of representing the past to oneself, in a way suitably responsive to how (...)
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  6. Endel Tulving (1984). Précis of Elements of Episodic Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):223.
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  7.  91
    James Genone (2006). Concepts and Imagery in Episodic Memory. Anthropology and Philosophy 7 (1/2):95-107.
    The relationship between perceptual experience and memory can seem to pose a chal- lenge for conceptualism, the thesis that perceptual experiences require the actualization of conceptual capacities. Since subjects can recall features of past experiences for which they lacked corresponding concepts at the time of the original experience, it would seem that a subject’s conceptual capacities do not impose a limit on what he or she can experience perceptually. But this conclusion ignores the fact that concepts can be composed (...)
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  8.  5
    Sarah Malanowski (2016). Is Episodic Memory Uniquely Human? Evaluating the Episodic-Like Memory Research Program. Synthese 193 (5):1433-1455.
    Recently, a research program has emerged that aims to show that animals have a memory capacity that is similar to the human episodic memory capacity. Researchers within this program argue that nonhuman animals have episodic-like memory of personally experienced past events. In this paper, I specify and evaluate the goals of this research program and the progress it has made in achieving them. I will examine some of the data that the research program has produced, (...)
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  9.  5
    Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (forthcoming). Making Decisions About the Future: Regret and the Cognitive Function of Episodic Memory. In Kourken Michaelian, Stanley Klein & Karl Szpunar (eds.), Seeing the future: Theoretical perspectives on future-oriented mental time travel. Oxford University Press 241-266.
    In the recent literature on episodic memory, there has been increasing recognition of the need to provide an account of its adaptive function. In this context, it is sometimes argued that episodic memory is critical for certain forms of decision making about the future. We criticize existing accounts that try to give episodic memory a role in decision making, before giving a novel such account of our own. This turns on the thought of a (...)
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  10. Nathan Stout (forthcoming). "Autism, Episodic Memory, and Moral Exemplars". Philosophical Psychology:1-13.
    This paper presents a challenge for exemplar theories of moral concepts. Some have proposed that we acquire moral concepts by way of exemplars of actions that are prohibited as well as of actions that are required, and we classify newly encountered actions based on their similarity to these exemplars. Judgments of permissibility then follow from these exemplar-based classifications. However, if this were true, then we would expect that individuals who lacked, or were deficient in, the capacity to form or access (...)
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  11. Endel Tulving (2005). Episodic Memory and Autonoesis: Uniquely Human? In Herbert S. Terrace & Janet Metcalfe (eds.), The Missing Link in Cognition: Origins of Self-Reflective Consciousness. Oxford University Press 3-56.
  12. Mark A. Wheeler (2000). Episodic Memory and Autonoetic Awareness. In Endel Tulving & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press 597-608.
  13. John P. Aggleton & John M. Pearce (2002). Neural Systems Underlying Episodic Memory: Insights From Animal Research. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
    Two strategies used to uncover neural systems for episodic-like memory in animals are discussed: (i) an attribute of episodic memory (what? when? where?) is examined in order to reveal the neuronal interactions supporting that component of memory; and (ii) the connections of a structure thought to be central to episodic memory in humans are studied at a level of detail not feasible in humans. By focusing on spatial memory (where?) and the hippocampus, (...)
     
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  14.  6
    Kourken Michaelian (2016). Mental Time Travel: Episodic Memory and Our Knowledge of the Personal Past. MIT Press.
  15. Stan Klein (2013). Making the Case That Episodic Recollection is Attributable to Operations Occurring at Retrieval Rather Than to Content Stored in a Dedicated Subsystem of Long-Term Memory. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7 (3):1-14.
    Episodic memory often is conceptualized as a uniquely human system of long-term memory that makes available knowledge accompanied by the temporal and spatial context in which that knowledge was acquired. Retrieval from episodic memory entails a form of first–person subjectivity called autonoetic consciousness that provides a sense that a recollection was something that took place in the experiencer’s personal past. In this paper I expand on this definition of episodic memory. Specifically, I suggest (...)
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  16.  16
    Sen Cheng & Markus Werning (2016). What is Episodic Memory If It is a Natural Kind? Synthese 193 (5):1345-1385.
    Colloquially, episodic memory is described as “the memory of personally experienced events”. Even though episodic memory has been studied in psychology and neuroscience for about six decades, there is still great uncertainty as to what episodic memory is. Here we ask how episodic memory should be characterized in order to be validated as a natural kind. We propose to conceive of episodic memory as a knowledge-like state that is identified (...)
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  17. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampal–Anterior Thalamic Axis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other recent models in (...)
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  18.  79
    Rocco J. Gennaro (1992). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and Episodic Memory. Philosophical Psychology 5 (4):333-47.
    My aim in this paper is to show that consciousness entails self-consciousness by focusing on the relationship between consciousness and memory. More specifically, I addreess the following questions: (1) does consciousness require episodic memory?; and (2) does episodic memory require self-consciousness? With the aid of some Kantian considerations and recent empirical data, it is argued that consciousness does require episodic memory. This is done after defining episodic memory and distinguishing it from (...)
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  19.  19
    Owen Holland & Hugo Gravato Marques (2010). Functional Embodied Imagination and Episodic Memory. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (2):245-259.
    The phenomenon of episodic memory has been studied for over 30 years, but it is only recently that its constructive nature has been shown to be closely linked to the processes underpinning imagination. This paper builds on recent work by the authors in developing architectures for a form of imagination suitable for use in artifacts, and considers how these architectures might be extended to provide a form of episodic memory.
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  20.  18
    Teresa McCormack (1999). Temporal Concepts and Episodic Memory: A Response to Hoerl. Mind and Language 14 (2):252-262.
    Hoerl claims that episodic memory is necessary for a concept of the past, and that we should consider some severely amnesic patients as lacking such a concept. I question whether this description of such patients is plausible, and whether it helps us understand lack of insight in amnesia. I finish by arguing that Hoerl’s analysis of what constitutes a concept of the past raises interesting developmental issues.
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  21.  35
    John H. Mace (2006). Episodic Remembering Creates Access to Involuntary Conscious Memory: Demonstrating Involuntary Recall on a Voluntary Recall Task. Memory 14 (8):917-924.
  22. Martin A. Conway (2002). Sensory-Perceptual Episodic Memory and its Context: Autobiographical Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
  23.  44
    James Russell & Robert Hanna (2012). A Minimalist Approach to the Development of Episodic Memory. Mind and Language 27 (1):29-54.
    Episodic memory is usually regarded in a Conceptualist light, in the sense of its being dependent upon the grasp of concepts directly relevant to the act of episodic recollection itself, such as a concept of past times and of the self as an experiencer. Given this view, its development is typically timed as being in the early school-age years. We present a minimalist, Non-Conceptualist approach in opposition to this view, but one that also exists in clear contrast (...)
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  24.  12
    C. SouChay, C. Moulin, D. Clarys, L. Taconnat & M. Isingrini (2007). Diminished Episodic Memory Awareness in Older Adults: Evidence From Feeling-of-Knowing and Recollection. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):769-784.
    The ability to reflect on and monitor memory processes is one of the most investigated metamemory functions, and one of the important ways consciousnesses interacts with memory. The feeling-of-knowing is one task used to evaluate individual’s capacity to monitor their memory. We examined this reflective function of metacognition in older adults. We explored the contribution of metacognition to episodic memory impairment, in relation to the idea that older adults show a reduction in memory awareness (...)
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  25. Endel Tulving (2002). Episodic Memory and Common Sense: How Far Apart? In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  26.  55
    Christoph Hoerl (2007). Episodic Memory, Autobiographical Memory, Narrative: On Three Key Notions in Current Approaches to Memory Development. Philosophical Psychology 20 (5):621 – 640.
    According to recent social interactionist accounts in developmental psychology, a child's learning to talk about the past with others plays a key role in memory development. Most accounts of this kind are centered on the theoretical notion of autobiographical memory and assume that socio-communicative interaction with others is important, in particular, in explaining the emergence of memories that have a particular type of connection to the self. Most of these accounts also construe autobiographical memory as a species (...)
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  27.  87
    James Russell (2014). Episodic Memory as Re-Experiential Memory: Kantian, Developmental, and Neuroscientific Currents. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):391-411.
    Recent work on the early development of episodic memory in my laboratory has been fuelled by the following assumption: if episodic memory is re-experiential memory then Kant’s analysis of the spatiotemporal nature of experience should constrain and positively influence theories of episodic memory development. The idea is that re-experiential memory will “inherit” these spatiotemporal features. On the basis of this assumption, Russell and Hanna (Mind and Language 27(1):29–54, 2012) proposed that (a) the (...)
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  28. Alan Baddeley, John P. Aggleton & Martin A. Conway (eds.) (2002). Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
    The term 'episodic memory' refers to our memory for unique, personal experiences, that we can date at some point in our past - our first day at school, the day we got married. It has again become a topic of great importance and interest to psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers. How are such memories stored in the brain, why do certain memories disappear (especially those from early in childhood), what causes false memories (memories of events we erroneously believe (...)
     
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  29. Andrew P. Yonelinas (2002). Components of Episodic Memory: The Contribution of Recollection and Familiarity. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  30.  6
    Thomas Suddendorf (2010). Episodic Memory Versus Episodic Foresight: Similarities and Differences. Cognitive Science 1 (1):99-107.
    There are logical and empirical grounds that link episodic memory and the ability to imagine future events. In some sense, both episodic memory and episodic foresight may be regarded as two sides of the same capacity to travel mentally in time. After reviewing some of the recent evidence for commonalities, I discuss limits of these parallels. There are fundamental differences between thinking about past and future events that need to be kept in clear view if (...)
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  31.  28
    Felipe De Brigard (2014). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather (...)
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  32.  1
    Teresa McCormack & Christoph Hoerl (2001). The Child in Time: Temporal Concepts and Self-Consciousness in the Development of Episodic Memory. In C. Moore & Karen Lemmon (eds.), The Self in Time: Developmental Perspectives. Erlbaum 203.
    Investigates the roles of temporal concepts and self-consciousness in the development of episodic memory. According to some theorists, types of long-term memory differ primarily in the degree to which they involve or are associated with self-consciousness (although there may be no substantial differences in the kind of event information that they deliver). However, a known difficulty with this view is that it is not obvious what motivates introducing self-consciousness as the decisive factor in distinguishing between types of (...)
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  33.  19
    Jérôme Dokic (2014). Feeling the Past: A Two-Tiered Account of Episodic Memory. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):413-426.
    Episodic memory involves the sense that it is “first-hand”, i.e., originates directly from one’s own past experience. An account of this phenomenological dimension is offered in terms of an affective experience or feeling specific to episodic memory. On the basis of recent empirical research in the domain of metamemory, it is claimed that a recollective experience involves two separate mental components: a first-order memory about the past along with a metacognitive, episodic feeling of knowing. (...)
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  34.  60
    William J. Friedman (2007). The Meaning of “Time” in Episodic Memory and Mental Time Travel. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):323-323.
    The role of time in episodic memory and mental time travel is considered in light of findings on humans' temporal memory and anticipation. Time is not integral or uniform in memory for the past or anticipation of the future. The commonalities of episodic memory and anticipation require further study.
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  35.  7
    James A. Bednar (2000). Internally-Generated Activity, Non-Episodic Memory, and Emotional Salience in Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):908-909.
    (1) Substituting (as Solms does) forebrain for brainstem in the search for a dream “controller” is counterproductive, since a distributed system need have no single controller. (2) Evidence against episodic memory consolidation does not show that REM sleep has no role in other types of memory, contra Vertes & Eastman. (3) A generalization of Revonsuo's “threat simulation” model in reverse is more plausible and is empirically testable. [Hobson et al.; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
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  36. John R. Hodges & Kim S. Graham (2002). Episodic Memory: Insights From Semantic Dementia. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  37.  13
    Kim S. Graham & John R. Hodges (1999). Episodic Memory in Semantic Dementia: Implications for the Roles Played by the Perirhinal and Hippocampal Memory Systems in New Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):452-453.
    Aggleton & Brown (A&B) propose that the hippocampal-anterior thalamic and perirhinal-medial dorsal thalamic systems play independent roles in episodic memory, with the hippocampus supporting recollection-based memory and the perirhinal cortex, recognition memory. In this commentary we discuss whether there is experimental support for the A&B model from studies of long-term memory in semantic dementia.
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  38.  11
    Jonathan K. Foster (2001). Cantor Coding and Chaotic Itinerancy: Relevance for Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampus? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):815-816.
    This commentary provides a critique of Tsuda's target article, focusing on the hippocampus and episodic long-term memory. More specifically, the relevance of Cantor coding and chaotic itinerancy for long-term memory functioning is considered, given what we know about the involvement of the hippocampus in the mediation of long-term episodic memory (based on empirical neuroimaging studies and investigations of brain-damaged amnesic patients).
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  39.  1
    Robert Hanna James Russell (2012). A Minimalist Approach to the Development of Episodic Memory. Mind and Language 27 (1):29-54.
    Episodic memory is usually regarded in a Conceptualist light, in the sense of its being dependent upon the grasp of concepts directly relevant to the act of episodic recollection itself, such as a concept of past times and of the self as an experiencer. Given this view, its development is typically timed as being in the early school‐age years . We present a minimalist, Non‐Conceptualist approach in opposition to this view, but one that also exists in clear (...)
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  40. Alan Baddeley (2002). The Concept of Episodic Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  41. Andrew R. Mayes & Neil Roberts (2002). Theories of Episodic Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  42. Stan Klein (2014). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):427-447.
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question "how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?" This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I (...)
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  43.  14
    D. Hassabis & E. A. Maguire (2007). Deconstructing Episodic Memory with Construction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (7):299-306.
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  44. Lars Nyberg, Roberto Cabeza & Endel Tulving (1998). Asymmetric Frontal Activation During Episodic Memory: What Kind of Specificity? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (11):419-420.
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  45.  59
    Mark A. Wheeler, Stuss, T. Donald & Endel Tulving (1997). Toward a Theory of Episodic Memory: The Frontal Lobes and Autonoetic Consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 121:331-54.
  46.  3
    Teresa McCormack (2001). Attributing Episodic Memory to Animals and Children. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormark (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press 285--314.
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  47.  9
    Iris Trinkler, John King, Hugo Spiers & Neil Burgess (2006). Part or Parcel? Contextual Binding of Events in Episodic Memory. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. OUP Oxford
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  48. Iris Trinkler, John King, Hugo Spiers & Burgess & Neil (2006). Part or Parcel? Contextual Binding of Events in Episodic Memory. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. OUP Oxford
     
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  49.  1
    Janet Metcalfe (1993). Monitoring and Gain Control in an Episodic Memory Model: Relation to P300 Event-Related Potentials. In A. Collins, S. Gathercole, Martin A. Conway & P. E. Morris (eds.), Theories of Memory. Lawrence Erlbaum 327--354.
  50.  29
    Lynn Nadel, Lee Ryan, Katrina Keil & Karen Putnam (1999). Episodic Memory: It's About Time (and Space). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):463-464.
    Aggleton & Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes (...)
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