Search results for 'Epistemics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Domenic Marbaniang, Rational Epistemics of Divine Reality Leading to Monism.
    Rational epistemics is the line of reasoning inclined to reason separated from reliance on experience that ultimately leads to monism or non-dualism.
     
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  2.  28
    Thomas R. Alley (1985). Organism-Environment Mutuality Epistemics, and the Concept of an Ecological Niche. Synthese 65 (3):411 - 444.
    The concept of an ecological niche (econiche) has been used in a variety of ways, some of which are incompatible with a relational or functional interpretation of the term. This essay seeks to standardize usage by limiting the concept to functional relations between organisms and their surroundings, and to revise the concept to include epistemic relations. For most organisms, epistemics are a vital aspect of their functional relationships to their surroundings and, hence, a major determinant of their econiche. Rejecting (...)
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  3.  57
    Alvin I. Goldman (1987). Foundations of Social Epistemics. Synthese 73 (1):109 - 144.
    A conception of social epistemology is articulated with links to studies of science and opinion in such disciplines as history, sociology, and political science. The conception is evaluative, though, rather than purely descriptive. Three types of evaluative approaches are examined but rejected: relativism, consensualism, and expertism. A fourth, truth-linked, approach to intellectual evaluation is then advocated: social procedures should be appraised by their propensity to foster true belief. Standards of evaluation in social epistemics would be much the same as (...)
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  4. Mark Schroeder, Attitudes and Epistemics.
    The semantic theory of expressivism has been applied within metaethics to evaluative words like ‘good’ and ‘wrong’, within epistemology to words like ‘knows’, and within the philosophy of language, to words like ‘true’, to epistemic modals like ‘might’, ‘must’, and ‘probably’, and to indicative conditionals. For each topic, expressivism promises the advantage of giving us the resources to say what sentences involving these words mean by telling us what it is to believe these things, rather than by telling us what (...)
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  5.  20
    Roger G. Koppl, Robert Kurzban & Lawrence Kobilinsky (2008). Epistemics for Forensics. Episteme 5 (2):141-159.
    Forensic science error rates are needlessly high. Applying the perspective of veritistic social epistemology to forensic science could produce new institutional designs that would lower forensic error rates. We make such an application through experiments in the laboratory with human subjects. Redundancy is the key to error prevention, discovery, and elimination. In the “monopoly epistemics” characterizing forensics today, one privileged actor is asked to identify the truth. In “democratic epistemics,” several independent parties are asked. In an experiment contrasting (...)
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  6.  22
    Roger G. Koppl Robert Kurzban Lawrence Kobilinsky (2008). Epistemics for Forensics. Episteme 5 (2):pp. 141-159.
    Forensic science error rates are needlessly high. Applying the perspective of veritistic social epistemology to forensic science could produce new institutional designs that would lower forensic error rates. We make such an application through experiments in the laboratory with human subjects. Redundancy is the key to error prevention, discovery, and elimination. In the “monopoly epistemics” characterizing forensics today, one privileged actor is asked to identify the truth. In “democratic epistemics,” several independent parties are asked. In an experiment contrasting (...)
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  7.  67
    Anthony S. Gillies (2004). Epistemic Conditionals and Conditional Epistemics. Noûs 38 (4):585–616.
  8. Alvin I. Goldman (1978). Epistemics: The Regulative Theory of Cognition. Journal of Philosophy 75 (10):509-523.
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  9.  99
    Martin Hollis (1986). More Paradoxical Epistemics. Analysis 46 (4):217 - 218.
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  10.  35
    Jan van Eijck & Christina Unger (2007). The Epistemics of Presupposition Projection. In Dekker Aloni (ed.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Amsterdam Colloquium. 235-240.
    We carry out the Karttunen-Stalnaker pragmatic account of presupposition projection within a state-of-the art version of dynamic epistemic logic. It turns out that the basic projection facts can all be derived from a Gricean maxim ‘be informative’. This sheds light on a recent controversy on the appropriateness of dynamic semantics as a tool for analysing presupposition.
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  11. G. L. S. Shackle (1975). Epistemics and Economics: A Critique of Economic Doctrines. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 26 (2):151-163.
     
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  12.  75
    Alan Coddington (1975). Creaking Semaphore and Beyond: A Consideration of Shackle's ‘Epistemics and Economics’. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 26 (2):151-163.
  13.  58
    Jonathan E. Adler (1989). Epistemics and the Total Evidence Requirement. Philosophia 19 (2-3):227-243.
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  14.  61
    Benny Shanon (2010). The Epistemics of Ayahuasca Visions. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):263-280.
    In this paper, I discuss substance-induced visions and consider their epistemic status, meaning, and modes of proper interpretation. I focus on the visions induced by ayahuasca, a powerful psychoactive plant-made brew that has had a central status and role in the indigenous tribal cultures of the upper Amazonian region. The brew is especially famous for the visions seen with it. These are often coupled with personal psychological insights, mentations concerning topics of special significance to one, intellectual (notably, philosophical and metaphysical) (...)
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  15.  7
    James Maffie (1991). What is Social About Social Epistemics? Social Epistemology 5 (2):101 – 110.
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  16.  45
    Jane Duran (2003). Feminist Epistemology and Social Epistemics. Social Epistemology 17 (1):45 – 54.
    Recent work in naturalised epistemology has focused almost exclusively on the intersection of cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge; work from sociolinguistics is just now beginning to gain ground. At the same time, feminist epistemologies have striven to articulate the precise paths of connectedness and relatedness that gynocentric theory standardly postulates as being characteristic of female ways of knowing. This paper attempts to articulate the intersection of sociolinguistically naturalised epistemology and feminist theory of knowledge. A model of gynocentrically centred justification (...)
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  17.  36
    Jan van Eijck, Modelling the Epistemics of Communication with Functional Programming.
    Dynamic epistemic logic is the logic of the effects of epistemic actions like making public announcements, passing private messages, revealing secrets, telling lies. This paper takes its starting point from the version of dynamic epistemic logic of [2], and demonstrates a tool that can be used for showing what goes on during a series of epistemic updates: the dynamic epistemic modelling tool DEMO [7, 9]. DEMO allows modelling epistemic updates, graphical display of update results, graphical display of action models, formula (...)
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  18.  32
    Vincent Hendricks, Active Epistemics: Methods, Recommendations and Hypotheses to Learn.
    Recent years have witnessed impressive leaps forward in modelling the dynamics of inquiry. Different models have been suggested to fathom various aspects of the reasoning processes relevant to inquiry; belief revision, dynamic epistemic and doxastic logics, stit-theory, logics of action, intention and doxastic voluntarism—in general, logics and formal models for – using an adequately covering term coined by Parikh – social software [Par02]. Many of these logics and formal frameworks rely on combining different modal logics in the realization that inquiry (...)
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  19.  32
    Cassandra L. Pinnick (2000). Veritistic Epistemology and Feminist Epistemology: A-Rational Epistemics? Social Epistemology 14 (4):281 – 291.
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  20.  1
    Jane Duran (1989). Epistemics: Epistemic Justification Theory Naturalized and the Computational Model of Mind. Upa.
    This author explores the intersection between cognitive science, as exemplified by the computational model of mind, and epistemologyó specifically, epistemic justification theory. Her analysis leads to the conclusion that some very specific and somewhat technical issues in epistemic justification theory can be at least partially resolved, if not entirely cleared up, by the use of the computational model. The third and fourth chapters of this work are devoted directly to that effort. Chapter one examines in detail epistemology and cognitive sciences, (...)
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  21.  8
    Alvin Goldman (1991). Social Epistemics and Social Psychology. Social Epistemology 5 (2):121 – 125.
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  22.  16
    Jane Duran (2003). Aesthetics, Epistemics, and Feminist Theory. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):32-39.
  23.  9
    Richard Biernacki (2014). Political Epistemics: The Secret Police, the Opposition and the End of East German Socialism. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):e4.
  24.  24
    Marshall Swain (1978). Epistemics and Epistemology. Journal of Philosophy 75 (10):523-525.
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  25.  16
    L. A. Boland (1974). Book Review:Epistemics & Economics: A Critique of Economic Doctrines G. L. S. Shackle. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 41 (4):424-.
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  26.  8
    G. Newman (1974). Book Reviews : Epistemics and Economics: A Critique of Economic Doctrines. By G. L. S. SHACKLE. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, I973. Pp. 482. $25.25. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (3):409-412.
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  27.  7
    Jane Duran (1998). Naturalized Epistemics and Conditional Reasoning. Metaphilosophy 29 (4):288-297.
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  28. Dan Diner (2008). Epistemics of the Holocaust Considering the Question of “Why?” And of “How?”. Naharaim - Zeitschrift Für Deutsch-Jüdische Literatur Und Kulturgeschichte 1 (2).
    The Holocaust was a rupture in civilisation – a Zivilisationsbruch –, a shattering of ontological certainty. The perception of the event enshrined in the notion of “rupture in civilisation” is the result of both the historical and the conceptual engagement with the event. Its manifest content seeks to combine two ways of discerning which are in fact opposed to one another: a particular one and a universal one. The particular perspective reflects the experience undergone by Jews as Jews of having (...)
     
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  29.  2
    Ido Ben-Zvi & Yoram Moses (2013). Agent-Time Epistemics and Coordination. In Kamal Lodaya (ed.), Logic and its Applications. Springer 97--108.
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  30.  4
    Bruce M. Thomas (1996). Cartesian Epistemics and Descartes' "Regulae". History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (4):433 - 449.
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  31.  45
    Domenic Marbaniang (ed.) (2009, 2011). Epistemics of Divine Reality. Lulu.
    ... belief that every creature is a manifestation of God pantheism – belief that everything is divine phenomena – (Kantian) reality-as-it-appears polytheism ...
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  32.  21
    Gary Hatfield (1986). Cognition and Epistemic Reliability: Comments on Goldman. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:312 - 318.
    The paper provisionally accepts the goal of Goldman's primary epistemics, which is to seek reliability values for basic cognitive processes, and questions whether such values may plausibly be expected. The reliability of such processes as perception and memory is dependent on other aspects of cognitive structure, and especially on one's "conceptual scheme," the evaluation of which goes beyond primary epistemics (and its dependence on cognitive science) to social epistemics, or indeed to traditional epistemology and philosophy of science. (...)
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  33.  31
    William Alston (2005). Beyond Justification: Dimensions of Epistemic Evaluation. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    " In a book that seeks to shift the ground of debate within theory of knowledge, William P. Alston finds that the century-lo.
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  34. Terence Cuneo (2007). The Normative Web: An Argument for Moral Realism. Oxford University Press.
    Moral realism of a paradigmatic sort -- Defending the parallel -- The parity premise -- Epistemic nihilism -- Epistemic expressivism : traditional views -- Epistemic expressivism : nontraditional views -- Epistemic reductionism -- Three objections to the core argument.
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  35.  29
    Isaac Levi (1991). The Fixation of Belief and its Undoing: Changing Beliefs Through Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    Isaac Levi's new book is concerned with how one can justify changing one's beliefs. The discussion is deeply informed by the belief-doubt model advocated by C. S. Peirce and John Dewey, of which the book provides a substantial analysis. Professor Levi then addresses the conceptual framework of potential changes available to an inquirer. A structural approach to propositional attitudes is proposed which rejects the conventional view that a propositional attitude involves a relation between an agent and either a linguistic entity (...)
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  36. Duncan Pritchard (2003). Virtue Epistemology and Epistemic Luck. Metaphilosophy 34 (1/2):106--130.
    The recent movement towards virtue–theoretic treatments of epistemological concepts can be understood in terms of the desire to eliminate epistemic luck. Significantly, however, it is argued that the two main varieties of virtue epistemology are responding to different types of epistemic luck. In particular, whilst proponents of reliabilism–based virtue theories have been focusing on the problem of what I call “veritic” epistemic luck, non–reliabilism–based virtue theories have instead been concerned with a very different type of epistemic luck, what I call (...)
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  37. John Corcoran (2012). A Farewell Letter To My Students. Philosophy Now 92:18-18.
    I am saying farewell after more than forty happy years of teaching logic at the University of Buffalo. But this is only a partial farewell. I will no longer be at UB to teach classroom courses or seminars. But nothing else will change. I will continue to be available for independent study. I will continue to write abstracts and articles with people who have taken courses or seminars with me. And I will continue to honor the LogicLifetimeGuarantee™, which is earned (...)
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  38. John Corcoran (2006). C. I. Lewis: History and Philosophy of Logic. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):1-9.
    C. I. Lewis (I883-I964) was the first major figure in history and philosophy of logic—-a field that has come to be recognized as a separate specialty after years of work by Ivor Grattan-Guinness and others (Dawson 2003, 257).Lewis was among the earliest to accept the challenges offered by this field; he was the first who had the philosophical and mathematical talent, the philosophical, logical, and historical background, and the patience and dedication to objectivity needed to excel. He was blessed with (...)
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  39.  3
    Paul K. Moser (1990). Empirical Justification. Noûs 24 (4):613-617.
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  40.  51
    Ivan Boh (1993). Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages. Routledge.
    Epistemic logic is one of the most exciting areas in medieval philosophy. Neglected almost entirely after the end of the Middle Ages, it has been rediscovered by philosophers of the twentieth century. Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages provides the first comprehensive study of the subject. Ivan Boh explores the contrast between epistemic and alethic conceptions of consequence, the general epistemic rules of consequence, the search for conditions of knowing contingent propositions, the problems of substitutivity in intentional contexts, the (...)
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  41. Wolfgang Lenzen (1978). Recent Work in Epistemic Logic. Acta Philosophica Fennica 30 (2):1-219.
     
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  42.  28
    Hans van Ditmarsch, Wiebe van der Hoek & Petar Iliev (2011). Everything is Knowable – How to Get to Know Whether a Proposition is True. Theoria 78 (2):93-114.
    Fitch showed that not every true proposition can be known in due time; in other words, that not every proposition is knowable. Moore showed that certain propositions cannot be consistently believed. A more recent dynamic phrasing of Moore-sentences is that not all propositions are known after their announcement, i.e., not every proposition is successful. Fitch's and Moore's results are related, as they equally apply to standard notions of knowledge and belief (S 5 and KD45, respectively). If we interpret ‘successful’ as (...)
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  43. Timothy J. Reiss (1982). The Discourse of Modernism. Cornell University Press.
     
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  44.  17
    John Koethe (2005). Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning. Cornell University Press.
    Scepticism, Knowledge, and Forms of Reasoning is an attempt to resolve how best to respond to such vexing arguments, a matter on which there is no consensus ...
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  45. Vincent F. Hendricks, Klaus Frovin Jøgensen & Stig Andur Pedersen (2003). Knowledge Contributors. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  46.  18
    John Corcoran (2011). Deducción/Deducibilidad. In Luis Vega and Paula Olmos (ed.), Compendio de Lógica, Argumentación y Retórica. Editorial Trotta 168--169.
    Following Quine [] and others we take deductions to produce knowledge of implications: a person gains knowledge that a given premise-set implies a given conclusion by deducing—producing a deduction of—the conclusion from those premises. How does this happen? How does a person recognize their desire for that knowledge of a certain implication, or that they lack it? How do they produce a suitable deduction? And most importantly, how does their production of that deduction provide them with knowledge of the implication. (...)
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  47.  10
    George N. Schlesinger (1985). The Range of Epistemic Logic. Humanities Press.
  48.  13
    Eduardo Salles O. Barra (2010). Valores epistêmicos no naturalismo normativos de Philip Kitcher. Principia 4 (1):1-26.
    This paper aims at analyzing Philip Kitcher's naturalistic epistemology, particularly its normative features, which are viewed as a sort of response to negative assessments made by radical naturalists on the plurality of epistemic values. According to them such values are ineffective for normative ends, e.g. theory choice. Differently from that quite excessive evaluation, Kitcher argues rather for explanatory unity as the most important and universal epistemic value. Even though Kitcher's arguments are sound, there remains some serious gaps as regards his (...)
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  49. Jaakko Hintikka (1989). The Logic of Epistemology and the Epistemology of Logic Selected Essays.
     
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  50.  15
    Hans P. van Ditmarsch (2002). Descriptions of Game Actions. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 11 (3):349-365.
    To describe simultaneous knowledge updates for different subgroups we propose anepistemic language with dynamic operators for actions. The language is interpreted onequivalence states (S5 states). The actions are interpreted as state transformers. Two crucial action constructors are learning and local choice. Learning isthe dynamic equivalent of common knowledge. Local choice aids in constraining theinterpretation of an action to a functional interpretation (state transformer).Bisimilarity is preserved under execution of actions. The language is applied todescribe various actions in card games.
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