Search results for 'Epistemology of Science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeffrey W. Roland (2009). A Euthyphronic Problem for Kitcher's Epistemology of Science. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):205-223.score: 729.0
    Philip Kitcher has advanced an epistemology of science that purports to be naturalistic. For Kitcher, this entails that his epistemology of science must explain the correctness of belief-regulating norms while endorsing a realist notion of truth. This paper concerns whether or not Kitcher's epistemology of science is naturalistic on these terms. I find that it is not but that by supplementing the account we can secure its naturalistic standing.
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  2. Alexander Bird (2010). The Epistemology of Science—a Bird's-Eye View. Synthese 175 (1):5 - 16.score: 714.0
    In this paper I outline my conception of the epistemology of science, by reference to my published papers, showing how the ideas presented there fit together. In particular I discuss the aim of science, scientific progress, the nature of scientific evidence, the failings of empiricism, inference to the best (or only) explanation, and Kuhnian psychology of discovery. Throughout, I emphasize the significance of the concept of scientific knowledge.
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  3. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2006). Genetic Epistemology and Piaget's Philosophy of Science: Piaget Vs. Kuhn on Scientific Progress. Theory and Psychology 16 (2):203-224.score: 696.0
    This paper concerns Jean Piaget's (1896–1980) philosophy of science and, in particular, the picture of scientific development suggested by his theory of genetic epistemology. The aims of the paper are threefold: (1) to examine genetic epistemology as a theory concerning the growth of knowledge both in the individual and in science; (2) to explicate Piaget's view of ‘scientific progress’, which is grounded in his theory of equilibration; and (3) to juxtapose Piaget's notion of progress with Thomas (...)
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  4. Kelly James Clark (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 500--513.score: 657.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * The Cognitive Science of Religion * The Internal Witness: The Sensus Divinitatis * Reformed Epistemology * Reformed Epistemology and Cognitive Science * Obstinacy in Belief * The External Witness: The Order of the Cosmos * The External Witness and the Cognitive Science of Religion * Conclusion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  5. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2010). Evolutionary Epistemology and the Aim of Science. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):209-225.score: 570.0
    Both Popper and van Fraassen have used evolutionary analogies to defend their views on the aim of science, although these are diametrically opposed. By employing Price's equation in an illustrative capacity, this paper considers which view is better supported. It shows that even if our observations and experimental results are reliable, an evolutionary analogy fails to demonstrate why conjecture and refutation should result in: (1) the isolation of true theories; (2) successive generations of theories of increasing truth-likeness; (3) empirically (...)
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  6. Cassandra L. Pinnick (1994). Feminist Epistemology: Implications for Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 61 (4):646-657.score: 567.0
    This article examines the best contemporary arguments for a feminist epistemology of scientific knowledge as found in recent works by S. Harding. I argue that no feminist epistemology of science is worthy of the name, because such an epistemology fails to escape well-known vicissitudes of epistemic relativism. But feminist epistemology merits attention from philosophers of science because it is part of a larger relativist turn in the social sciences and humanities that now aims to (...)
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  7. Jordi Vallverdú I. Segura (2009). Computational Epistemology and E-Science: A New Way of Thinking. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (4):557-567.score: 558.0
    Recent trends towards an e-Science offer us the opportunity to think about the specific epistemological changes created by computational empowerment in scientific practices. In fact, we can say that a computational epistemology exists that requires our attention. By ‘computational epistemology’ I mean the computational processes implied or required to achieve human knowledge. In that category we can include AI, supercomputers, expert systems, distributed computation, imaging technologies, virtual instruments, middleware, robotics, grids or databases. Although several authors talk about (...)
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  8. Jordi Vallverdú I. Segura (2009). Computational Epistemology and E-Science: A New Way of Thinking. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (4):557-567.score: 558.0
    Recent trends towards an e-Science offer us the opportunity to think about the specific epistemological changes created by computational empowerment in scientific practices. In fact, we can say that a computational epistemology exists that requires our attention. By ‘computational epistemology’ I mean the computational processes implied or required to achieve human knowledge. In that category we can include AI, supercomputers, expert systems, distributed computation, imaging technologies, virtual instruments, middleware, robotics, grids or databases. Although several authors talk about (...)
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  9. Valentín A. Bazhanov (2008). Social Milieu and Evolution of Logic, Epistemology, and the History of Science: The Case of Marxism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):157-169.score: 540.0
    The impact of social factors upon the philosophical investigations in a broad sense is quite evident. Nevertheless their impact upon epistemology as a branch of philosophy, logic, and history of science as fields of research with noticeable philosophical content is not evident enough. We are keen to claim that this impact exists within some limits, although it is not so overtly evident. Moreover in the case of Marxism it is of a paradoxical nature. Marxism always puts the accent (...)
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  10. Kristian Camilleri (2014). Toward a Constructivist Epistemology of Thought Experiments in Science. Synthese 191 (8):1697-1716.score: 540.0
    This paper presents a critical analysis of Tamar Szabó Gendler’s view of thought experiments, with the aim of developing further a constructivist epistemology of thought experiments in science. While the execution of a thought experiment cannot be reduced to standard forms of inductive and deductive inference, in the process of working though a thought experiment, a logical argument does emerge and take shape. Taking Gendler’s work as a point of departure, I argue that performing a thought experiment involves (...)
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  11. Mark R. Discher (2002). Michael Polanyi's Epistemology Of Science And Its Implications For A Problem In Moral Philosophy. Tradition and Discovery 29 (1):49-59.score: 540.0
    Ethical particularists allege that there are, on account of epistemological limitations, no such things as general moral principles. This paper defends the existence of general moral principles by adapting and appropriating Polanyi’s epistemology of science to this problem in moral philosophy.
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  12. Greg Yudin (2008). Sense in Epistemology of Social Science. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 46:109-115.score: 531.0
    There has been recently a substantial rise of relativism in the epistemology of social science. It has seriously discredited normative function of the epistemology and changed the context of epistemological discussion. Some hold that the problem of relativism cannot be solved by scientific means, because it ultimately depends on personal beliefs. However, present paper shows that there are different scientific strategies of coping with relativism. The key argument is that the epistemological stance towards relativism is closely related (...)
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  13. S. Pihlstrom (1999). What Shall We Do with Emergence? A Survey of a Fundamental Issue in the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Science. South African Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):192-210.score: 531.0
     
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  14. Charles E. Boklage (1998). On the Position of Statistical Significance in the Epistemology of Experimental Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):195-195.score: 525.0
    Although various statistical measures may have other valid uses, the single purpose served by statistical significance testing in the epistemology of experimental science is as a peremptory rebuttal of one potential alternative interpretation of the data.
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  15. Elizabeth Anderson, Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.score: 522.0
    Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science studies the ways in which gender does and ought to influence our conceptions of knowledge, the knowing subject, and practices of inquiry and justification. It identifies ways in which dominant conceptions and practices of knowledge attribution, acquisition, and justification systematically disadvantage women and other subordinated groups, and strives to reform these conceptions and practices so that they serve the interests of these groups. Various practitioners of feminist epistemology and philosophy of (...) argue that dominant knowledge practices disadvantage women by (1) excluding them from inquiry, (2) denying them epistemic authority, (3) denigrating their “feminine” cognitive styles and modes of knowledge, (4) producing theories of women that represent them as inferior, deviant, or significant only in the ways they serve male interests, (5) producing theories of social phenomena that render women's activities and interests, or gendered power relations, invisible, and (6) producing knowledge (science and technology) that is not useful for people in subordinate positions, or that reinforces gender and other social hierarchies. Feminist epistemologists trace these failures to flawed conceptions of knowledge, knowers, objectivity, and scientific methodology. They offer diverse accounts of how to overcome these failures. They also aim to (1) explain why the entry of women and feminist scholars into different academic disciplines, especially in biology and the social sciences, has generated new questions, theories, and methods, (2) show how gender has played a.. (shrink)
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  16. Thomas Mormann (2005). Mathematical Metaphors in Natorp’s Neo-Kantian Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. In Falk Seeger, Johannes Lenard & Michael H. G. Hoffmann (eds.), Activity and Sign. Grounding Mathematical Education. Springer.score: 522.0
    A basic thesis of Neokantian epistemology and philosophy of science contends that the knowing subject and the object to be known are only abstractions. What really exists, is the relation between both. For the elucidation of this “knowledge relation ("Erkenntnisrelation") the Neokantians of the Marburg school used a variety of mathematical metaphors. In this con-tribution I reconsider some of these metaphors proposed by Paul Natorp, who was one of the leading members of the Marburg school. It is shown (...)
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  17. Todd A. Grantham (2000). Evolutionary Epistemology, Social Epistemology, and the Demic Structure of Science. Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):443-463.score: 522.0
    One of the principal difficulties in assessing Science as aProcess (Hull 1988) is determining the relationship between the various elements of Hull's theory. In particular, it is hard to understand precisely how conceptual selection is related to Hull's account of the social dynamics of science. This essay aims to clarify the relation between these aspects of his theory by examining his discussion of the``demic structure'' of science. I conclude that the social account cando significant explanatory work independently (...)
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  18. Richard F. Kitchener (1985). Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Genetic Psychology. Synthese 65 (1):3 - 31.score: 522.0
    Genetic epistemology analyzes the growth of knowledge both in the individual person (genetic psychology) and in the socio-historical realm (the history of science). But what the relationship is between the history of science and genetic psychology remains unclear. The biogenetic law that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny is inadequate as a characterization of the relation. A critical examination of Piaget's Introduction à l'Épistémologie Généntique indicates these are several examples of what I call stage laws common to both areas. Furthermore, (...)
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  19. S. Rahman (ed.) (2004). Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science. Dordrecht, Kluwer.score: 522.0
    The aim of the series Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science, of which this is the first volume, is to take up anew the challenge of considering the ...
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  20. Harold Kincaid & Jennifer McKitrick, Introduction to Establishing Medical Reality: Essays in the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Biomedical Science.score: 522.0
    Medicine has been a very fruitful source of significant issues for philosophy over the last 30 years. The vast majority of the issues discussed have been normative—they have been problems in morality and political philosophy that now make up the field called bioethics. However, biomedical science presents many other philosophical questions that have gotten relatively little attention, particularly topics in metaphysics, epistemology and philosophy of science. This volume focuses on problems in these areas as they surface in (...)
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  21. Shahid Rahman & John Symons (2004). Logic, Epistemology and the Unity of Science: An Encyclopedic Project in the Spirit of Neurath and Diderot. In. In S. Rahman J. Symons (ed.), Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science. Kluwer Academic Publisher. 3--15.score: 522.0
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  22. Howard Hsueh-Hao Chiang (2009). The Laboratory Technology of Discrete Molecular Separation: The Historical Development of Gel Electrophoresis and the Material Epistemology of Biomolecular Science, 1945-1970. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (3):495 - 527.score: 519.0
    Preparative and analytical methods developed by separation scientists have played an important role in the history of molecular biology. One such early method is gel electrophoresis, a technique that uses various types of gel as its supporting medium to separate charged molecules based on size and other properties. Historians of science, however, have only recently begun to pay closer attention to this material epistemological dimension of biomolecular science. This paper substantiates the historiographical thread that explores the relationship between (...)
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  23. Paul Dicken (2010). Constructive Empiricism: Epistemology and the Philosophy of Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 519.0
  24. Jack A. Rowell (1989). Piagetian Epistemology: Equilibration and the Teaching of Science. Synthese 80 (1):141 - 162.score: 516.0
    That Piagetian epistemology has the dynamics of knowledge growth as its core consideration predetermines a need to consider it as potentially applicable to teaching. This paper addresses that need by first outlining the Piagetian theory of equilibration and then applying it to the construction of methods of teaching science.
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  25. James H. Fetzer (1993). Glossary of Epistemology/Philosophy of Science. Paragon House.score: 507.0
     
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  26. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Schurz (eds.) (1987). Recent Developments in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Reports of the 11th International Wittgenstein-Symposium, 4th to 13th August 1986, Kirchberg Am Wechsel, Austria. [REVIEW] Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.score: 507.0
     
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  27. David Mercer (2008). Science, Legitimacy, and “Folk Epistemology” in Medicine and Law: Parallels Between Legal Reforms to the Admissibility of Expert Evidence and Evidence-Based Medicine. Social Epistemology 22 (4):405 – 423.score: 502.0
    This paper explores some of the important parallels between recent reforms to legal rules for the admissibility of scientific and expert evidence, exemplified by the US Supreme Court's decision in Daubert v Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in 1993, and similar calls for reforms to medical practice, that emerged around the same time as part of the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) movement. Similarities between the “movements” can be observed in that both emerged from a historical context where the quality of medicine and (...)
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  28. James R. Wible (1998). The Economics of Science: Methodology and Epistemology as If Economics Really Mattered. Routledge.score: 495.0
    This book explores aspects of science from an economic point of view. The author begins with economic models of misconduct in science, moving on to discuss other important issues, including market failure and the market place of ideas.
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  29. Robert N. Mccauley (1988). Epistemology in an Age of Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 1 (2):143-152.score: 492.0
    Abstract Like the logical empiricists many contemporary philosophers wish to bring the determinateness of scientific judgment to epistemology. Recent efforts to naturalise epistemology (such as those of the Churchlands) seem to jeopardise the position of epistemology as a normative discipline. Putnam argues that attempts to naturalise epistemology are self?refuting. My goal is not to defeat the project for the naturalisation of epistemology, but rather to help clarify what it does and does not amount to. I (...)
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  30. Paul A. Roth (2008). The Epistemology of Science After Quine. In Stathis Psillos & Martin Curd (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Science. Routledge. 3.score: 492.0
  31. Cliff Hooker (2013). Georg Simmel and Naturalist Interactivist Epistemology of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):311-317.score: 492.0
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  32. Kristine Hays Lynning & Anja Skaar Jacobsen (2011). Grasping the Spirit in Nature: Anschauung in Ørsted's Epistemology of Science and Beauty. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):45-57.score: 492.0
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  33. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 489.0
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Marx; on (...)
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  34. Justin L. Barrett (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):174-189.score: 486.0
    Reformed epistemology and cognitive science have remarkably converged on belief in God. Reformed epistemology holds that belief in God is basic—that is, belief in God is a natural, non-inferential belief that is immediately produced by a cognitive faculty. Cognitive science of religion also holds that belief in gods is (often) non-reflectively and instinctively produced—that is, non-inferentially and automatically produced by a cognitive faculty or system. But there are differences. In this paper, we will show some remarkable (...)
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  35. Kevin McCain & Brad Weslake (2013). Evolutionary Theory and the Epistemology of Science. In Kostas Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer. 101-119.score: 486.0
    Evolutionary theory is a paradigmatic example of a well-supported scientific theory. In this chapter we consider a number of objections to evolutionary theory, and show how responding to these objections reveals aspects of the way in which scientific theories are supported by evidence. Teaching these objections can therefore serve two pedagogical aims: students can learn the right way to respond to some popular arguments against evolutionary theory, and they can learn some basic features of the structure of scientific theories and (...)
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  36. Kei Yoshida (2012). Re-Politicising Philosophy of Science: A Continuing Challenge for Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):365-378.score: 486.0
    The aim of this paper is to investigate how we can reunite social philosophy and philosophy of science to address problems in science and technology. First, referring to Don Howard?s, George Reisch?s, and Philip Mirowski?s works, I shall briefly explain how philosophy of science was depoliticised during the cold war. Second, I shall examine Steve Fuller?s criticism of Thomas Kuhn. Third, I shall scrutinise Philip Kitcher?s view of well-ordered science. Fourth, I shall emphasise the importance of (...)
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  37. Tom Eyers (2014). French Philosophy of Science, Structuralist Epistemology, and the Problem of the Subject. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):267-285.score: 486.0
    This article examines the multiple relations between the rationalist tradition of French philosophy of science exemplified by the work of Gaston Bachelard, and the rethinking of the relation between science and ideology undertaken by Louis Althusser and a young Alain Badiou in the 1960s. Both Bachelard and Althusser are interrogated for the philosophy of language that underpins their respective visions of scientificity; in turn, the problem of the subject is posed, in part through an investigation of Althusser's inheritance (...)
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  38. Vincent Fella Hendricks, Arne Jakobsen & Stig Andur Pedersen (2000). Identification of Matrices in Science and Engineering. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 31 (2):277-305.score: 483.0
    Engineering science is a scientific discipline that from the point of view of epistemology and the philosophy of science has been somewhat neglected. When engineering science was under philosophical scrutiny it often just involved the question of whether engineering is a spin-off of pure and applied science and their methods. We, however, hold that engineering is a science governed by its own epistemology, methodology and ontology. This point is systematically argued by comparing the (...)
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  39. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 480.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better (...)
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  40. Backsansky Oleg E. (2008). Rethinking Epistemology, Philosophy of Science and Technology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 53:335-342.score: 480.0
    Modern cognitive approach represents the interdisciplinary branch of scientific reflection uniting researchers of knowledge, studying laws of purchase, transformation, representation, storages and reproduction of the information. People react to own experience, instead of "objective" reality. Cognitive map of the world according to which we operate, our feelings, belief and life experience create. We have no direct access to a "objective" reality, therefore our cognitive map is for us this unique "real" reality. Cognitive science widely uses methodology of synergetic approach (...)
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  41. L. A. Whitt (1990). Book Review:Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science Sandra Harding, Merrill B. Hintikka. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 57 (3):542-.score: 477.0
  42. Justin Biddle (2007). Lessons From the Vioxx Debacle: What the Privatization of Science Can Teach Us About Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 21 (1):21 – 39.score: 477.0
    Since the early 1980s, private, for-profit corporations have become increasingly involved in all aspects of scientific research, especially of biomedical research. In this essay, I argue that there are dangerous epistemic consequences of this trend, which should be more thoroughly examined by social epistemologists. In support of this claim, I discuss a recent episode of pharmaceutical research involving the painkiller Vioxx. I argue that the research on Vioxx was epistemically problematic and that the primary cause of these inadequacies was faulty (...)
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  43. Joel Katzav (2014). The Epistemology of Climate Models and Some of its Implications for Climate Science and the Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46:228-238.score: 477.0
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  44. Justin B. Biddle (2014). Can Patents Prohibit Research? On the Social Epistemology of Patenting and Licensing in Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 45:14-23.score: 477.0
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  45. Donald T. Campbell (1989). Fragments of the Fragile History of Psychological Epistemology and Theory of Science. In Barry Gholson (ed.), Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press. 21--46.score: 477.0
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  46. Mario De Caro & Rosaria Egidi (eds.) (2010). The Architecture of Knowledge: Epistemology, Agency and Science. Roma Tre Università Degli Studi.score: 477.0
     
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  47. Kishore Gandhi (1990). The Synchronization of Science, Culture and Consciousness: The Quest for New Epistemology. In Kishor Gandhi (ed.), The Odyssey of Science, Culture, and Consciousness. Abhinav Publications. 21.score: 477.0
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  48. Dudley Shapere (1987). Method in the Philosophy of Science and Epistemology. In Nancy J. Nersessian (ed.), The Process of Science: Contemporary Philosophical Approaches to Understanding Scientific Practice. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 477.0
     
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  49. Paolo Savoia (2010). Sexual Science and Self-Narrative: Epistemology and Narrative Technologies of the Self Between Krafft-Ebing and Freud. History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):17-41.score: 474.0
    The aim of this article is to understand an important passage in the history of the sciences of the psyche: starting from the psychiatric problematization — and the consequent emergence — of the concept and the object called ‘sexuality’ in the second half of the 19th century, it attempts to show a series of continuities and discontinuities between this kind of reasoning and the birth of psychoanalysis in the first years of the 20th century. The particular focus is therefore directed (...)
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