Search results for 'Epistemology, Natural Law, Possibility' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark J. Cherry (ed.) (2004). Natural Law and the Possibility of a Global Ethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 876.0
    Accounts of natural law moral philosophy and theology sought principles and precepts for morality, law, and other forms of social authority, whose prescriptive force was not dependent for validity on human decision, social influence, past tradition, or cultural convention, but through natural reason itself. This volume critically explores and assesses our contemporary culture wars in terms of: the possibility of natural law moral philosophy and theology to provide a unique, content-full, canonical morality; the character and nature (...)
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  2. Roger S. Woolhouse (1972). From Conceivability to Possibility. Ratio 14:144--154.score: 512.0
    It is often supposed that in order to refute the view that laws of nature are necessary truths it is sufficient to appeal to Hume's argument from the conceivability of to the possibility of their being false. But while Hume's argument does present the necessitarian with insuperable difficulties it needs to be made clear just what these are. The mere appeal to Hume is quite insufficient for what he says can be interpreted in more than one way. And if (...)
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  3. B. H. Woo (2012). Pannenberg's Understanding of the Natural Law. Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (3):346-366.score: 192.0
    The ethics of Wolfhart Pannenberg has a nomological dimension at its center. Based on the history of the natural law tradition, Pannenberg maintains the possibility of the natural law theory on the following five grounds. -/- The theological ground is his understanding of the Decalogue, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Pauline interpretation of the law. For its historical ground, Pannenberg articulates the natural law theories of Patristic theology and the theologies of Troeltsch and Brunner. (...)
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  4. Thomas V. Upton (forthcoming). Aristotle's Moral Epistemology: The Possibility of Ethical Demonstration. New Scholasticism.score: 189.0
    In one common book and in two texts of the eudemian ethics", aristotle compares the ends of ethics with the hypotheses of scientific demonstration. t irwin has argued that this comparison is inaccurate and ought to have been abandoned by aristotle. the author argues against irwin's position by contending that ethical ends are comparable to scientific hypotheses. because they are comparable, he further argues that ethical ends, grasped as ends that entail certain necessary pre-conditions for the achievement of these ends, (...)
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  5. Susan Haack (2004). Epistemology Legalized: Or, Truth, Justice, and the American Way. American Journal of Jurisprudence 49 (1):43-61.score: 168.0
    Jeremy Bentham's powerful metaphor of Injustice, and her handmaid Falsehood reminds us, if we need reminding, that justice requires not only just laws, and just administration of those laws, but also factual truth - objective factual truth; and that in consequence the very possibility of a just legal system requires that there be objective indications of truth, i.e., objective standards of better or worse evidence... My plan [in this Olin Lecture in Jurisprudence, presented at Notre Dame law School, in (...)
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  6. Alastair Wilson (2013). Schaffer on Laws of Nature. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):653-667.score: 152.0
    In ‘Quiddistic Knowledge’ (Schaffer in Philos Stud 123:1–32, 2005), Jonathan Schaffer argued influentially against the view that the laws of nature are metaphysically necessary. In this reply I aim to show how a coherent and well-motivated form of necessitarianism can withstand his critique. Modal necessitarianism—the view that the actual laws are the laws of all possible worlds—can do justice to some intuitive motivations for necessitarianism, and it has the resources to respond to all of Schaffer’s objections. It also has certain (...)
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  7. Pierre Manent (2012). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction / Eve Grace and Christopher Kelly; Part I. Politics and Economics: 1. Rousseau and the Illustrious Montesquieu / Christopher Kelly; 2. Political Economy and Individual Liberty / Ryan Patrick Hanley; Part II. Science and Epistemology: 3. The Presence of Sciences in Rousseau's Trajectory and Works / Bruno Bernardi and Bernadette Bensaud-Vincent; 4. Epistemology and Political Perception in the Case of Rousseau / Terence Marshall; Part III. The Modern or Classical, Theological or Philosophical, Foundations of Rousseau's System: 5. On the Intention of Rousseau / Leo Strauss; 6. On Strauss on Rousseau / Victor Gourevitch; 7. Built on Sand: Moral Law in Rousseau's Second Discourse / Victor Gourevitch; 8. Rousseau and Pascal / Matthew W. Maguire; Part IV. Rousseau as Educator and Legislator: 9. The Measure of the Possible: Imagination in Rousseau's Philosophical Pedagogy / Richard Velkley; 10. Rousseau's French Revolution / Pamela K. Jensen; 11. Ro. [REVIEW] In Eve Grace & Christopher Kelly (eds.), The Challenge of Rousseau. Cambridge University Press.score: 135.0
     
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  8. Brandon C. Look (2009). Leibniz and Locke on Natural Kinds. In Vlad Alexandrescu (ed.), Branching Off: The Early Moderns in Quest for the Unity of Knowledge. Zeta Books.score: 126.0
    One of the more interesting topics debated by Leibniz and Locke and one that has received comparatively little critical commentary is the nature of essences and the classification of the natural world.1 This topic, moreover, is of tremendous importance, occupying a position at the intersection of the metaphysics of individual beings, modality, epistemology, and philosophy of language. And, while it goes back to Plato, who wondered if we could cut nature at its joints, as Nicholas Jolley has pointed out, (...)
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  9. Michael J. White, Locke on Newton's Principia: Mathematics or Natural Philosophy?score: 126.0
    In his Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke explicitly refers to Newton’s Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica in laudatory but restrained terms: “Mr. Newton, in his never enough to be admired Book, has demonstrated several Propositions, which are so many new Truths, before unknown to the World, and are farther Advances in Mathematical Knowledge” (Essay, 4.7.3). The mathematica of the Principia are thus acknowledged. But what of philosophia naturalis? Locke maintains that natural philosophy, conceived as natural science (as opposed (...)
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  10. A. Olivier (2010). The Possibility of a Science of Consciousness Critical Reflections on Dennett and Merleau-Ponty. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2).score: 126.0
    In his latest book, entitled “Sweet dreams”, Daniel Dennett confirms and expands on his argument for a natural science of human consciousness. He dubs his view heterophenomenology: a third-person, scientific form of phenomenological description that can account for the most private and ineffable subjective experiences. A central part of his book consists of a reinvention of Jackson's thought experiment about color blind scientist, Mary, who tries to figure out what color experience is like. I explore another variation of this (...)
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  11. Andrzej Kapusta (2008). Epistemology and the Human Sciences. Dialogue and Universalism 18 (7/8):127-136.score: 126.0
    In this paper I make a distinction between some characteristic features of human activity which not only challenge the possibility of being explained (reduced) in terms of cause and effect relationship, or by universal regularities, but which assign an element of interpretation and understanding to every human activity. My aim is to demonstrate that it is not the understanding that is submitted to scientific explanation but that every scientific explanation contains the component of interpretation and is evaluated from the (...)
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  12. Phillip Bricker (1991). Plenitude of Possible Structures. Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):607-619.score: 123.0
    Which mathematical structures are possible, that is, instantiated by the concrete inhabitants of some possible world? Are there worlds with four-dimensional space? With infinite-dimensional space? Whence comes our knowledge of the possibility of structures? In this paper, I develop and defend a principle of plenitude according to which any mathematically natural generalization of possible structure is itself possible. I motivate the principle pragmatically by way of the role that logical possibility plays in our inquiry into the world.
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  13. John T. Roberts (2008). The Law-Governed Universe. Oxford University Press.score: 122.0
    The law-governed world-picture -- A remarkable idea about the way the universe is cosmos and compulsion -- The laws as the cosmic order : the best-system approach -- The three ways : no-laws, non-governing-laws, governing-laws -- Work that laws do in science -- An important difference between the laws of nature and the cosmic order -- The picture in four theses -- The strategy of this book -- The meta-theoretic conception of laws -- The measurability approach to laws -- What (...)
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  14. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 118.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  15. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 118.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  16. Lisa Warenski (2010). "Naturalistic Epistemologies and A Priori Justification&Quot;. In Marcin Milkowski & Konrad Kalmont-Taminski (eds.), Beyond Description: Naturalism and Normativity. College Publications.score: 114.0
    Broadly speaking, a naturalistic approach to epistemology seeks to explain human knowledge – and justification in particular – as a phenomenon in the natural world, in keeping with the tenets of naturalism. Naturalism is typically defined, in part, by a commitment to scientific method as the only legitimate means of attaining knowledge of the natural world. Naturalism is often thought to entail empiricism by virtue of this methodological commitment. However, scientific methods themselves may incorporate a priori elements, so (...)
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  17. Ron A. Shapira (1999). Fuzzy Measurement in the Mishnah and the Talmud. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (2-3):273-288.score: 108.0
    I discuss the attitude of Jewish law sources from the 2nd–:5th centuries to the imprecision of measurement. I review a problem that the Talmud refers to, somewhat obscurely, as impossible reduction. This problem arises when a legal rule specifies an object by referring to a maximized (or minimized) measurement function, e.g., when a rule applies to the largest part of a divided whole, or to the first incidence that occurs, etc. A problem that is often mentioned is whether there might (...)
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  18. Maxwell J. D. Ramstead (forthcoming). Naturalizing What? Varieties of Naturalism and Transcendental Phenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-43.score: 102.0
    This paper aims to address the relevance of the natural sciences for transcendental phenomenology, that is, the issue of naturalism. The first section distinguishes three varieties of naturalism and corresponding forms of naturalization: an ontological one, a methodological one (with strong and weak variants), and an epistemological one (also with strong and weak variants). In light of these distinctions, in the second section, I examine the main projects aiming to “naturalize phenomenology”: neurophenomenology, front-loaded phenomenology, and formalized approaches to phenomenology. (...)
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  19. Michael Dix (2013). Living and Knowing: How Nature Makes Knowledge Possible. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-34.score: 97.5
    800x600 Traditionally, epistemologies have been human-centred, while typically presenting themselves as objective “views from nowhere” applicable to all knowers. One consequence of this is that the question, ‘How is knowledge possible?’, has been either implausibly answered or ignored – except by naturalistic epistemologies, and in particular, evolutionary, biosemiotic, and autopoeitic approaches. These approaches, recognizing that humans are not the only knowers, perceivers, cognizers and rememberers in nature, ask instead, ‘How does nature make knowledge possible?’ thereby reconceiving epistemology as study of (...)
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  20. Nicla Vassallo & Claudia Bianchi (2010). Naturalizing Meaning Through Epistemology: Some Critical Notes. In M. Dorato M. Suàrez (ed.), Epsa Epistemology and Methodology of Science. Springer. 311--321.score: 96.0
    According to the theory of meaning as justification, semantics is closely entangled with epistemology: knowing the meaning of an utterance amounts to knowing the justification one may offer for it. In this perspective, the theory of meaning is connected with the epistemic theory of justification, namely the theory that undergoes the more explicit attempts of naturalization. Is it possible to extend those attempts to the notion of meaning? There are many ways of naturalizing the notion of meaning, independently of its (...)
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  21. Philippe Gagnon (2002). La Théologie de la Nature Et la Science à l'Ère de L'Information. Cerf.score: 88.0
    The history of the relationship between Christian theology and the natural sciences has been conditioned by the initial decision of the masters of the "first scientific revolution" to disregard any necessary explanatory premiss to account for the constituting organization and the framing of naturally occurring entities. Not paying any attention to hierarchical control, they ended-up disseminating a vision and understanding in which it was no longer possible for a theology of nature to send questions in the direction of the (...)
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  22. Leila Haaparanta (1999). On the Possibility of Naturalistic and of Pure Epistemology. Synthese 118 (1):31-47.score: 87.0
    This paper deals with two opposite metaphilosophical doctrines concerning the nature of philosophy. More specifically, it is a study of the naturalistic view that philosophical, hence also epistemological, knowledge cannot be distinguished from empirical knowledge, and of the antinaturalistic view that philosophical, hence also epistemological, knowledge, is pure, that is, independent of empirical knowledge and particularly of the special sciences. The conditions of the possibility of naturalistic and of pure epistemology are studied in terms of phenomenological philosophy. It is (...)
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  23. Edward P. Stabler Jr (1984). Rationality in Naturalized Epistemology. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):64-78.score: 87.0
    Quine's (1969) proposal that the foundationalist programs in epistemology should be abandoned in favor of a scientific study of how we come to hold our theories about the world is still widely misunderstood. It does not eliminate the possibility of rational adjudication of scientific dispute, nor is it essentially tied to behaviorist approaches in psychology. On the contrary, recent work in psychology and philosophy of science can very naturally be seen as embodying the sort of program envisioned by Quine; (...)
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  24. Richard F. Kitchener (1987). Is Genetic Epistemology Possible? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (3):283-299.score: 87.0
    Several philosophers have questioned the possibility of a genetic epistemology, an epistemology concerned with the developmental transitions between successive states of knowledge in the individual person. Since most arguments against the possibility of a genetic epistemology crucially depend upon a sharp distinction between the genesis of an idea and its justification, I argue that current philosophy of science raises serious questions about the universal validity of this distinction. Then I discuss several senses of the genetic fallacy, indicating which (...)
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  25. Kathleen Lennon (2003). Naturalizing and Interpretive Turns in Epistemology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (3):245 – 259.score: 87.0
    In this paper I want to suggest that causal and interpretive approaches to epistemology are in tension with one another. Drawing on the work of hermeneutic writers I suggest that epistemological justification is an interpretive process. The possibility of rational justification requires attention to our locatedness within the domain of reasons, into which we have been culturally initiated. The recognition that there is no transcendent processes of rational justification has to be addressed from within this framework and cannot be (...)
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  26. Christopher J. Preston (2000). Conversing with Nature in a Postmodern Epistemological Framework. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):227-240.score: 87.0
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Jim Cheney argues for a postmodern epistemological framework that supports a conception of inquiry as a kind of “conversation” with nature. I examine how Cheney arrives at this metaphor and consider why it might be an appealing one for environmental philosophers. I note how, in the absence of an animistic account of nature, this metaphor turns out to be problematic. A closer examination of the postmodern insights that Cheney employs reveals that it is (...)
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  27. Wojciech Włoch (2013). Epistemological–Normative Function of the Basic Norm in Hans Kelsen's Pure Theory of Law. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (2):25-42.score: 87.0
    The objective of the article is to present Hans Kelsen’s basic norm concept that allows the combination of the two relevant dimensions in relation to juridical science, namely the positivity and validity of law. The role of the concept of basic norm is presented by the author of the Reine Rechtslehre with reference to Kant (read through the works by H. Cohen) as a concept enabling formulation of an answer to the question “To what extent is it possible to interpret (...)
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  28. James Maffie (1997). “Just-so” Stories About “Inner Cognitive Africa”: Some Doubts About Sorensen's Evolutionary Epistemology of Thought Experiments. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 12 (2):207-224.score: 84.0
    Roy Sorensen advances an evolutionary explanation of our capacity for thought experiments which doubles as a naturalized epistemological justification. I argue Sorensens explanation fails to satisfy key elements of environmental-selectionist explanations and so fails to carry epistemic force. I then argue that even if Sorensen succeeds in showing the adaptive utility of our capacity, he still fails to establish its reliability and hence epistemic utility. I conclude Sorensens account comes to little more than a just-so story.
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  29. Andrew Pyle (2006). Atomism and Natural Necessity. Philo 9 (1):47-61.score: 84.0
    When the atomic theory was revived in the seventeenth century, the atomists faced a problem concerning the status of the laws of nature. On the face of it, the postulation of absolutely hard, rigid, and impenetrable atoms seems to entail the existence of natural necessities and impossibilities: Atoms A and B cannot interpenetrate, so atom A must push atom B when they collide. The properties of compound bodies are to be explained in terms of their “textures” (i.e., the arrangements (...)
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  30. John Meixner (1987). Frequencies and Possibility. Philosophy Research Archives 13:73-77.score: 84.0
    A popular conception of probability for many years now has been the relative frequency interpretation, made famous by the work of Reichenbach and von Mises, and more recently by Salmon and others. The frequency view has played important roles of various sorts in virtually every area in epistemology and the philosophy of science, including explanation, causation, the justification of induction, the nature of laws and lawlike statements, and so on. A major attraction of the frequency conception has been its claim (...)
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  31. Brad S. Gregory (2008). No Room for God? History, Science, Metaphysics, and the Study of Religion. History and Theory 47 (4):495 - 519.score: 81.0
    Intellectual history, philosophy, and science’s own self-understanding undermine the claim that science entails or need even tend toward atheism. By definition a radically transcendent creator-God is inaccessible to empirical investigation. Denials of the possibility or actual occurrence of miracles depend not on science itself, but on naturalist assumptions that derive originally from a univocal metaphysics with its historical roots in medieval nominalism, which in turn have deeply influenced philosophy and science since the seventeenth century. The metaphysical postulate of naturalism (...)
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  32. Patrick A. Heelan (2013). Phenomenology, Ontology, and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Science 18 (2):379-385.score: 81.0
    This essay is dominated by three themes that recur contrapuntally in Heisenberg’s writings: observation, description, and ontology—prompted always by a concern about the role played by the subjective inquirer in scientific meaning-making, and by the ontology of scientific claims. Among the related themes are; the tension between paradigmatic concerns with structure and philosophical concerns with reality, the possibility of scientific revolutions, such as relativity and quantum mechanics, that can overthrow the classical traditions of natural science and the inadequacy (...)
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  33. Christopher Lauer (2010). The Suspension of Reason in Hegel and Schelling. Continuum.score: 81.0
    Introduction -- Suspension -- Hegel and Schelling -- Outline of the whole -- The surge of reason : faculty epistemology in Kant and Fichte -- The first critique's basic distinction -- The third critique -- Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre -- Ascendant reason : the early Schelling -- Of the I -- The treatises -- Metastatic reason : Schelling's nature philosophy -- Organic reason : ideas for a philosophy of nature -- Rational nature : on the world-soul -- Inhibition of nature : the (...)
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  34. Sylvia Berryman (1998). Euclid and the Sceptic: A Paper on Vision, Doubt, Geometry, Light and Drunkenness. Phronesis 43 (2):176-196.score: 81.0
    Philosophy in the period immediately after Aristotle is sometimes thought to be marked by the decline of natural philosophy and philosophical disinterest in contemporary achievements in the sciences. But in one area at least, the early third century B.C.E. was a time of productive interaction between such disparate fields as epistemology, physics and geometry. Debates between the sceptics and the dogmatic philosophical schools focus on epistemological problems about the possibility of self-evident appearances, but there is evidence from Euclid's (...)
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  35. S. Berryman (1998). Euclid and the Sceptic: A Paper on Vision, Doubt, Geometry, Light and Drunkenness. Phronesis 43 (2):176 - 196.score: 81.0
    Philosophy in the period immediately after Aristotle is sometimes thought to be marked by the decline of natural philosophy and philosophical disinterest in contemporary achievements in the sciences. But in one area at least, the early third century B.C.E. was a time of productive interaction between such disparate fields as epistemology, physics and geometry. Debates between the sceptics and the dogmatic philosophical schools focus on epistemological problems about the possibility of self-evident appearances, but there is evidence from Euclid's (...)
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  36. Robert Mulligan (2006). Transactional Economics: John Dewey's Ways of Knowing and the Radical Subjectivism of the Austrian School. Education and Culture 22 (2):61-82.score: 81.0
    The subjectivism of the Austrian school of economics is a special case of Dewey's transactional philosophy, also known as pragmatism or pragmatic epistemology. The Austrian economists Carl Friedrich Menger (1840-1921) and Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973) adopted an Aristotelian deductive approach to economic issues such as social behavior and exchange. Like Menger and Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992) viewed scientific knowledge, even in the social sciences, as asserting and aiming for objective certainty. Hayek was particularly critical of attempts to apply the (...)
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  37. Ruth Weintraub (1990). Decision-Theoretic Epistemology. Synthese 83 (1):159 - 177.score: 81.0
    In this paper, I examine the possibility of accounting for the rationality of belief-formation by utilising decision-theoretic considerations. I consider the utilities to be used by such an approach, propose to employ verisimilitude as a measure of cognitive utility, and suggest a natural way of generalising any measure of verisimilitude defined on propositions to partial belief-systems, a generalisation which may enable us to incorporate Popper's insightful notion of verisimilitude within a Bayesian framework. I examine a dilemma generated by (...)
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  38. Piotr Hoffman (1989). Violence in Modern Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 81.0
    Following on the arguments adumbrated in his previous works, Piotr Hoffman here argues that the notion of and concern with violence are not limited to political philosophy but in fact form the essential component of philosophy in general. The acute awareness of the ever-present possibility of violence, Hoffman claims, filters into and informs ontology and epistemology in ways that require careful analysis. In his previous book, Doubt, Time, Violence , Hoffman explored the theme of violence in relation to Descartes' (...)
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  39. Maarten Van Dyck (2009). On the Epistemological Foundations of the Law of the Lever. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):315-318.score: 78.0
    In this paper I challenge Paolo Palmieri’s reading of the Mach-Vailati debate on Archimedes’s proof of the law of the lever. I argue that the actual import of the debate concerns the possible epistemic (as opposed to merely pragmatic) role of mathematical arguments in empirical physics, and that construed in this light Vailati carries the upper hand. This claim is defended by showing that Archimedes’s proof of the law of the lever is not a way of appealing to a non-empirical (...)
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  40. Jaegwon Kim (1988). What is "Naturalized Epistemology?&Quot;. Philosophical Perspectives 2:381-405.score: 73.5
    This paper analyzes and evaluates quine's influential thesis that epistemology should become a chapter of empirical psychology. quine's main point, it is argued, is that normativity must be banished from epistemology and, more generally, philosophy. i claim that without a normative concept of justification, we lose the very concept of knowledge, and that belief ascription itself becomes impossible without a normative concept of rationality. further, the supervenience of concepts of epistemic appraisal shows that normative epistemology is indeed possible.
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  41. John A. Schuster (2012). Physico-Mathematics and the Search for Causes in Descartes' Optics—1619–1637. Synthese 185 (3):467-499.score: 72.0
    One of the chief concerns of the young Descartes was with what he, and others, termed “physico-mathematics”. This signalled a questioning of the Scholastic Aristotelian view of the mixed mathematical sciences as subordinate to natural philosophy, non explanatory, and merely instrumental. Somehow, the mixed mathematical disciplines were now to become intimately related to natural philosophical issues of matter and cause. That is, they were to become more ’physicalised’, more closely intertwined with natural philosophising, regardless of which species (...)
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  42. Philippe Gagnon (2009). Les Limites du Vivant Sont-Elles Riches D’Une Leçon? Contribution à L’Étude du Déterminisme Morphique. Eikasia. Revista de Filosofía 27 (August):155-186.score: 72.0
    Freedom is first apprehended as the pursuit of an activity which implies the choice to defend a thesis among other possible ones. This translation of the problem of freedom in an articulate language presupposes a complex nervous system and sensory apparatuses which we take for granted. In this study, I try to explore the undergrounds of the problem of freedom along with the suggestion that the notion of coding could enable one to bridge nature and the mind. When organisms invent, (...)
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  43. Patrick Kain (2010). Practical Cognition, Intuition, and the Fact of Reason. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. de Gruyter. 211--230.score: 69.0
    Kant’s claims about supersensible objects, and his account of the epistemic status of such claims, remain poorly understood, to the detriment of our understanding of Kant’s metaphysical and epistemological system. In the Critique of Practical Reason, and again in the Critique of Judgment, Kant claims that we have practical cognition (Erkenntnis) and knowledge (Wissen) of the moral law and of our supersensible freedom; that this cognition and knowledge cohere with, yet go beyond the limits of, our theoretical cognition; and that (...)
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  44. Petter Næss (2006). Cost-Benefit Analyses of Transportation Investments — Neither Critical nor Realistic. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (1):32-60.score: 69.0
    This paper discusses the practice of cost-benefit analyses of transportation infrastructure investment projects from the meta-theoretical perspective of critical realism. Such analyses are based on a number of untenable ontological assumptions about social value, human nature and the natural environment. In addition, main input data are based on transport modelling analyses based on a misleading `local ontology' among the model makers. The ontological misconceptions translate into erroneous epistemological assumptions about the possibility of precise predictions and the validity of (...)
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  45. Peter Jacco Sas (1999). Plugging the Leaks in Neurath's Ship: A Defense of Naturalistic Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (1):131-153.score: 69.0
    This paper examines the question whether foundational epistemology (“FE”) can be replaced by naturalized epistemology (“NE”). First, it argues that Quine's defense of NE is inadequate since it is only based on arguments showing the impossibility of the logical empiricist version of FE rather than on arguments for the impossibility of FE as such. Second, it proposes that a more promising argument for the impossibility of FE can be found in the Münchhausen-trilemma which aims at showing that ultimate foundations (and, (...)
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  46. L. Coutellec & I. Doussan (2012). Legal and Ethical Apprehensions Regarding Relational Object. The Case of Genetically Modified Fish. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):861-875.score: 68.0
    This paper is the result of a contribution between ethics and law, which will be used as thought-process tools, to address the complex issue of legal and ethical statuses of GM fish. To find answers, we propose to consider this issue from a wider angle, looking at the relations between the human, animal, and living worlds. We show that it is possible to construct other forms of intellectual logic that, without setting these worlds in opposition, do not lapse into relativism (...)
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  47. James McBain (2004). Epistemic Analysis and the Possibility of Good Informants. Principia 8 (2):193-211.score: 66.0
    The question as to the appropriate method of epistemic analysis has always been an issue for epistemologists. In recent years, the traditional method utilized in epistemology - conceptual analysis - has come under attack from various perspectives. Yet, often no replacement method is given in its place. In two works, "A Practical Explication of Knowledge" and Knowledge and the State of Nature, Edward Craig proposes a new way of doing epistemology. Craig's epistemic method eschews traditional conceptual analysis in favor of (...)
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  48. Andreas Kamlah (2009). Kants Antwort auf Hume und eine linguistische Analyse seiner Modalbegriffe. Kant-Studien 100 (1):28-52.score: 66.0
    The concept of necessity plays a central role in Kant's philosophy, but seems to lead to severe paradoxes. On the one hand he states: ‘Notwendigkeit und strenge Allgemeinheit sind sichere Kennzeichen einer Erkenntnis a priori’. On the other hand he talks also about ‘notwendig (d. i. nach einer Regel)’, which means ‘necessary according to the empirical natural laws’. However, he never states explicitly the distinction between these two different concepts of necessity. Either Kant's philosophy is inconsistent or we have (...)
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  49. Crawford L. Elder (1999). Ontology and Realism About Modality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):292 – 302.score: 66.0
    To be a realist about modality, need one claim that more exists than just the various objects and properties that populate the world—e.g. worlds other than the actual one, or maximal consistent sets of propositions? Or does the existence of objects and properties by itself involve the obtaining of necessities (and possibilities) in re? The latter position is now unpopular but not unfamiliar. Aristotle held that objects have essences, and hence necessarily have certain properties. Recently it has been argued that (...)
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  50. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 66.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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