Search results for 'Eric Cunningham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Angela Cunningham (1985). The Nature of Work in the Thought of Eric Gill and Vincent McNabb. The Chesterton Review 11 (3):295-306.score: 360.0
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  2. Eric Cunningham (2007). Hallucinating the End of History: Nishida, Zen, and the Psychedelic Eschaton. Academica Press.score: 240.0
    The problem of Nishida Kitaro's historical philosophy and an introduction to the psychedelic paradigm -- The Zen nexus between Nishida Kitaro and modern psychedelic experience -- Experience and the self: the early phase of Nishida's thought (1911-1931) -- Nishida Kitaro's historical world (1931-1945) -- A psychedelic paradigm of history -- Hallucinating the end of history: reflections on myth, the eschaton and the problem of overcoming modernity.
     
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  3. Barrett T. Kitch, Catherine DesRoches, Cara Lesser, Amy Cunningham & Eric G. Campbell (2013). Systems Model of Physician Professionalism in Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):1-10.score: 240.0
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  4. A. Cunningham (2001). A Reply to Peter Dear's 'Religion, Science and Natural Philosophy: Thoughts on Cunningham's Thesis'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):387-391.score: 180.0
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  5. Anne Cunningham (2003). Autonomous Consumption: Buying Into the Ideology of Capitalism\011Anne Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):229-236.score: 180.0
  6. Richard P. Cunningham (1990). Book Review: Criticizing the Media: An Essay Review by Richard P. Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):59 – 63.score: 180.0
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  7. Richard Cunningham (1996). Book Review: New Books Provide a Sharper Focus on Public Journalism: An Essay Review by Richard Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 11 (3):184 – 191.score: 180.0
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  8. Conor Cunningham (2002). Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines do not (...)
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  9. Frank Cunningham (2002). Theories of Democracy. Routledge.score: 60.0
    a critical introduction Frank Cunningham. economic 200; and globality/ globalism 200, 204 group loyalties 62-3 group representation 95-100; challenges 97-100; modes 97; types 96 guild socialism 137 hegemony 190-1,213 Hobbesist 73, ...
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  10. Anthony Cunningham (2001). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. University of California Press.score: 60.0
    The Heart of What Matters shows that literature has a powerful and unique role to play in understanding life's deepest ethical problems. Anthony Cunningham provides a rigorous critique of Kantian ethics, which has enjoyed a preeminent place in moral philosophy in the United States, arguing that it does not do justice to the reality of our lives. He demonstrates how fine literature can play an important role in honing our capacity to see clearly and choose wisely as he develops (...)
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  11. Anthony Cunningham (2013). Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This book examines the notion of honor with an eye to dissecting its intellectual demise and with the aim of making a case for honor’s rehabilitation. Western intellectuals acknowledge honor’s influence, but they lament its authority. For Western democratic societies to embrace honor, it must be compatible with social ideals like liberty, equality, and fraternity. Cunningham details a conception of honor that can do justice to these ideals. This vision revolves around three elements—character (being), relationships (relating), and activities and (...)
     
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  12. Frank Cunningham (2001). Theories of Democracy: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This is the first book to be published in this exciting new series on political philosophy. Cunningham provides a critical and clear introduction to the main contemporary approaches to democracy: participatory democracy, classic and radical pluralism, deliberative democracy, catallaxy, and others. Also discussed are theorists in the background of current democratic thought, such as Tocqueville, Mill, and Rousseau. The book includes applications of democratic theories including an extended discussion of democracy and globalisation.
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  13. C. B. Macpherson & Frank Cunningham (2013). Burke, Reissue. Oup Canada.score: 60.0
    One of the twentieth century's most respected political philosophers presents a controversial perspective on the political ideas and intellectual legacy of Edmund Burke. This new edition includes an introduction by Frank Cunningham, placing the book in the broader context of Macpherson's work.
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  14. Macpherson & Frank Cunningham (2013). The Rise and Fall of Economic Justice and Other Essays, Reissue. Oup Canada.score: 60.0
    In his final book, one of the giants of twentieth-century political philosophy returns to his key themes of state, class, and property to consider such contemporary questions as economic justice, human rights, and the nature of industrial democracy. This new edition includes an introduction by Frank Cunningham, placing the book in the broader context of Macpherson's work.
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  15. Suzanne Cunningham (2000). What Is a Mind?: An Integrative Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Hackett.score: 30.0
    Designed for a first course in the philosophy of mind, this book has several distinctive features.
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  16. Stanley B. Cunningham (1999). Getting It Right: Aristotle's "Golden Mean" as Theory Deterioration. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 14 (1):5 – 15.score: 30.0
    Journalism and media ethics texts commonly invoke Aristotle's Golden Mean as a principal ethical theory that models such journalistic values as balance, fairness, and proportion. Working from Aristotle's text, this article argues that the Golden Mean model, as widely understood and applied to media ethics, seriously belies Aristotle's intent. It also shortchanges the reality of our moral agency and epistemic responsibility. A more authentic rendering of Aristotle's theory of acting rightly, moreover, has profound implications for communication ethicists and media practitioners.
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  17. Bryon Cunningham (2001). The Reemergence of 'Emergence'. Philosophy of Science 3 (September):S63-S75.score: 30.0
    A variety of recent philosophical discussions, particularly on topics relating to complexity, have begun to reemploy the concept of 'emergence'. Although multiple concepts of 'emergence' are available, little effort has been made to systematically distinguish them. In this paper, I provide a taxonomy of higher-order properties that (inter alia) distinguishes three classes of emergent properties: (1) ontologically basic properties of complex entities, such as the mythical vital properties, (2) fully configurational properties, such as mental properties as they are conceived of (...)
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  18. Suzanne Cunningham (1997). Two Faces of Intentionality. Philosophy of Science 64 (3):445-460.score: 30.0
    Theories of intentionality need to account for non-cognitive states like emotions as well as cognitive states like beliefs. When certain non-cognitive states are included, one can formulate a feasible physicalist account of intentionality that highlights its evolutionary roots. I argue that recent experimental data support just such a move.
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  19. Donald J. Cunningham, James B. Schreiber & Connie M. Moss (2005). Belief, Doubt and Reason: C. S. Peirce on Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (2):177–189.score: 30.0
    In this paper, we explore Peirce's work for insights into a theory of learning and cognition for education. Our focus for this exploration is Peirce's paper The Fixation of Belief (FOB), originally published in 1877 in Popular Science Monthly. We begin by examining Peirce's assertion that the study of logic is essential for understanding thought and reasoning. We explicate Peirce's view of the nature of reasoning itself—the characteristic guiding principles or ‘habits of mind’ that underlie acts of inference, the dimensions (...)
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  20. Bryon Cunningham (2001). Capturing Qualia: Higher-Order Concepts and Connectionism. Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):29-41.score: 30.0
    Antireductionist philosophers have argued for higher-order classifications of qualia that locate consciousness outside the scope of conventional scientific explanations, viz., by classifying qualia as intrinsic, basic, or subjective properties, antireductionists distinguish qualia from extrinsic, complex, and objective properties, and thereby distinguish conscious mental states from the possible explananda of functionalist or physicalist explanations. I argue that, in important respects, qualia are intrinsic, basic, and subjective properties of conscious mental states, and that, contrary to antireductionists' suggestions, these (...)
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  21. Andrew S. Cunningham (2007). Hume's Vitalism and its Implications. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):59 – 73.score: 30.0
  22. Suzanne Cunningham (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "Merleau-Ponty and the Myth of Bodily Intentionality". Noûs 22 (1):49-50.score: 30.0
  23. Suzanne Cunningham (1985). Perceptual Meaning and Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (4):553-566.score: 30.0
  24. Anne Cunningham (2003). Autonomous Consumption: Buying Into the Ideology of Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):229 - 236.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this article is to examine three different approaches to autonomy in order to demonstrate how each leads to a different conclusion about the ethicality of advertising. I contend that Noggle''s (1995) belief-based autonomy theory provides the most complete understanding of autonomy. Read in conjunction with Arendt''s theory of cooperative power, Noggle''s theory leads to the conclusion that advertising does not violate consumers'' autonomy. Although it is possible for advertisers to abuse the power granted them by society these (...)
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  25. Suzanne Cunningham (1989). Perception, Meaning, and Mind. Synthese 80 (August):223-241.score: 30.0
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  26. Stanley B. Cunningham (2001). Responding to Propaganda: An Ethical Enterprise. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (2 & 3):138 – 147.score: 30.0
    By virtue of its epistemic deficits, propaganda is very much an unethical phenomenon. Coping effectively with propaganda requires a communicative response that confronts its inherent unethicality with ethically grounded resistance. In this article, I propose two congruent plans of communicative action, each of which rests on an apparent ethical connection: J. Michael Sproule's (1994) reclaiming of classical eloquence, and Jonathan Rauch's (1993) provocative program of "liberal science.".
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  27. G. Watts Cunningham (1911). Self-Consciousness and Consciousness of Self. Mind 20 (80):530-537.score: 30.0
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  28. W. Patrick Cunningham (1998). The Golden Rule as Universal Ethical Norm. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (1):105 - 109.score: 30.0
    "The golden rule" (Matthew 7:12) is a formulation of natural moral law, a logical way to divide good from evil. It has been attacked by J.W. Hennessey, Jr. and Bernard Gert as a "particularist preachment." On the contrary, it remains a useful, universal guide to moral conduct and cannot be considered a self-centered, subjective guide to the moral life. We must agree with Jeffrey Wattles that there are multiple possible meanings to the "rule", some legitimate and some spurious. The legitimate (...)
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  29. G. Watts Cunningham (1919). On Nietzsche's Doctrine of the Will to Power. Philosophical Review 28 (5):479-490.score: 30.0
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  30. Frank Cunningham, Cities - a Philosophical Inquiry.score: 30.0
    Two years ago, the distribution of the world’s people reached the point at which over half now live in cities. Some social scientists and urban planners (but few political leaders other than those of large municipalities) had seen this change coming. With one group of exceptions, philosophers have paid less attention to the subject. I would like to advance some ideas about how to think philosophically about cities, drawing upon North American and European thinkers and traditions.
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  31. Frank Cunningham (2005). Market Economies and Market Societies. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):129–142.score: 30.0
    One would be hard pressed these days to find any defenders of the sort of full-blown economic plannification characteristic of the late Soviet Union and other Communist states, and with good reason given their economic inefficiency. The departure from plannification is, of course, celebrated by neo-liberal champions of capitalism. Critics of unbridled capitalism are less enthusiastic about the embrace of economic markets, which are correctly seen as promoting inequalities and objectionably competitive values. A question put to themselves by the critics (...)
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  32. Suzanne Cunningham (1983). Husserl and Private Languages: A Response to Hutcheson. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (1):103-111.score: 30.0
  33. Peter Hobbins, Lynley Anderson, Nikki Cunningham, Mike Carnahan, Julie Park, Justin Denholm, Christopher Newell & Jean McPherson (2005). Liberal Eugenics: In Defence of Human Enhancement. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (2):106-115.score: 30.0
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  34. G. Watts Cunningham (1945). Nietzsche on the Philosopher. Philosophical Review 54 (2):155-172.score: 30.0
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  35. Suzanne Cunningham (1991). A Darwinian Approach to Functionalism. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:145-157.score: 30.0
    I argue against the claim of certain functionalists, like Jerry Fodor, that theories of psychological states ought to abstract from the physiology of the systems that exhibit such states. Taking seriously Darwin’s claim that living organisms struggle to survive, and that their “mental powers” are adaptations that assist them in this struggle, I argue that not only emotions but also paradigm cognitive states like beliefs are intimately bound up with the physiology of the organism and its efforts to maintain its (...)
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  36. William P. Cunningham (2000). Listening to the Wilderness: The Life and Work of Sigurd F. Olson. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):323 – 329.score: 30.0
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  37. Frank Cunningham (2007). The University and Social Justice. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):153-162.score: 30.0
    Considerations of social justice pertain to universities with respect to reserved spaces for applicants from disadvantaged groups, targeted hiring, differential student fees or faculty workloads and salaries, and similarly contested matters. This paper displaces debates over what constitutes just allocation of university resources from those over theories of justice in general to those about alternative visions of the proper goal of universities. To this end, educational and democratic theories of John Dewey are drawn on as an alternative to elitist conceptions (...)
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  38. David Carr, Suzanne Cunningham & Ronald Hitzler (1986). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 3 (2):167-179.score: 30.0
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  39. Stanley B. Cunningham (1993). A Place in the Sun: Making Room for Media Ethics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (3):147 – 155.score: 30.0
    A recent issue of Report from the Institute for Philosophy and Public Affairs identifies four ethical issues for the 21st century. By not including media ethics, the Report overlooks a crucial logical priority. That oversight is reflected in greater academe where media ethics (unlike, say, biomedical ethics) is scarcely acknowledged. This article argues that communication ethics, as an integral part of the wider enterprise of media literacy, deserves greater prominence in our town-and-gown communities.
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  40. G. Watts Cunningham (1914). Bergson's Conception of Duration. Philosophical Review 23 (5):525-539.score: 30.0
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  41. G. Watts Cunningham (1938). Meaning, Reference, and Significance. Philosophical Review 47 (2):155-175.score: 30.0
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  42. Anthony Cunningham (2001). Self-Governance and Cooperation. Robert H. Myers. Mind 110 (439):799-802.score: 30.0
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  43. Francis A. Cunningham (1970). The "Real Distinction" in John Quidort. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):9-28.score: 30.0
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  44. G. Watts Cunningham (1924). Bergson's Doctrine of Intuition. Philosophical Review 33 (6):604-606.score: 30.0
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  45. G. Watts Cunningham (1949). On the Meaningfulness of Vague Language. Philosophical Review 58 (6):541-562.score: 30.0
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  46. G. Watts Cunningham (1932). On the Second Copernican Revolution in Philosophy. Philosophical Review 41 (2):107-129.score: 30.0
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  47. Anne Cunningham (1999). Responsible Advertisers: A Contractualist Approach to Ethical Power. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 14 (2):82 – 94.score: 30.0
    American democracy depends on the free exchange of ideas to create a rational and well informed public, which, in turn, makes decisions that benefit society as a whole. Unfortunately, media reliance on advertising may be eroding the necessary free flow of information. This article addresses the proper role of advertisers in the media. Certainly advertisers enjoy some degree of economic power over the media, but should that influence be used to control media content? Arendt's (1986) view of communicative power demonstrates (...)
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  48. Miguel Leith & Jim Cunningham (2001). Aspect and Interval Tense Logic. Linguistics and Philosophy 24 (3):331-381.score: 30.0
    Linguistic phenomena of tense and aspect have been investigated in a great deal of theoretical work in linguistics, philosophy and computer science. Modern tense logics, established by Prior, are part of this effort. Point tense logics offer an intuitive representation of tense but lack the expressiveness to represent many aspectual structures. Interval tense logics offer more expressiveness but in the general case can be computationally intractable. From a linguistic perspective there is the problem of precisely how to formalise the aspectual (...)
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  49. Evander Bradley McGilvary, G. Watts Cunningham, C. I. Lewis & Ernest Nagel (1939). A Symposium of Reviews of John Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Journal of Philosophy 36 (21):561-581.score: 30.0
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  50. John V. R. Bull, Daniel Callahan, Richard P. Cunningham & Keith Moyer (1990). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (2):136 – 145.score: 30.0
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