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  1. Eric Lawrence Gans (2008). The Scenic Imagination: Originary Thinking From Hobbes to the Present Day. Stanford University Press.
    The Scenic Imagination argues that the uniquely human phenomenon of representation, as manifested in language, art, and ritual, is a scenic event focused on a central object designated by a sign. The originary hypothesis posits the necessity of conceiving the origin of the human as such an event. In traditional societies, the scenic imagination through which this scene of origin is conceived manifests itself in sacred creation narratives. Modern thought is defined by the independent use of the scenic imagination to (...)
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  2. Eric Lawrence Gans (2001). Mallarme Contra Wagner. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):14-30.
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  3. Eric Lawrence Gans (2001). Mallarmé. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1).
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  4. Eric Lawrence Gans (1997). Signs of Paradox: Irony, Resentment, and Other Mimetic Structures. Stanford University Press.
    Starting from the minimal principle of generative anthropology - that human culture originates as 'the deferral of violence through representation' - the author proposes a new understanding of the fundamental concepts of metaphysics and an explanation of the historical problematic that underlies the postmodern 'end of culture.' Part I discusses the nature of paradox and the related notion of irony, as well as the fundamental concepts of being, thinking, and signification, leading to an anthropological interpretation of the origin of philosophy (...)
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  5. Eric Lawrence Gans (1993). Originary Thinking: Elements of Generative Anthropology. Stanford University Press.
    Originary Thinking deals with generative anthropology, a radically new conception of human science founded on the hypothesis that humanity emerged in a communal event in which intraspecific violence was deferred by the production of a linguistic sign. The author pursues in the areas of religion, ethics, philosophy of language, theory of discourse, and aesthetics, the exploration begun in his The Origin of Language (1981) and continued in The End of Culture (1985) and Science and Faith (1990). The present volume adds (...)
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