60 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Eric Mack (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  1. Eric Mack, Voluntaryism: The Political Thought of Auberon Herbert.
    Auberon Herbert (1838 — 1906) was one of the distinctive figures in the profound and wideranging intellectual debate which took place during the late Victorian age. It was during this period, in the intellectual and social ferment of the 1880s and 1890s, that Herbert formulated and expounded voluntaryism, his system of "thorough" individualism. Carrying natural rights theory to its logical limits, Herbert demanded complete social and economic freedom for all non-coercive individuals and..
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Eric Mack (forthcoming). 7 How Liberty Upsets Patterns. Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eric Mack (2013). Inside Public Reason. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):389-402.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Eric Mack (2013). Inside Public Reason: A Review Essay of Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011), P 621 (Book Review). [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):389-402.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Eric Mack (2012). Lysander Spooner: Nineteenth-Century America's Last Natural Rights Theorist. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):139-176.
    The main purpose of this essay is to articulate the ideas of the last powerful advocate of natural rights in nineteenth-century America. That last powerful advocate was the Massachusetts-born radical libertarian Lysander Spooner . Besides his powerful antebellum attacks on slavery, Spooner developed forceful arguments on behalf of a strongly individualistic conception of natural law and private property rights and against coercive moralism, coercive paternalism, and state authority and legislation. This essay focuses on the theoretical core of Spoonera doctrine that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Eric Mack (2011). Friedrich Hayek on the Nature of Social Order and Law. In Catherine H. Zuckert (ed.), Political Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Authors and Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Eric Mack (2011). Libertarianism. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Eric Mack (2010). The Natural Right of Property. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):53-78.
    The two main theses of are: (i) that persons possess an original, non-acquired right not to be precluded from making extra-personal material their own (or from exercising discretionary control over what they have made their own); and (ii) that this right can and does take the form of a right that others abide by the rules of a (justifiable) practice of property which facilitates persons making extra-personal material their own (and exercising discretionary control over what they have made their own). (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Eric Mack (2009). Individualism and Libertarian Rights. In Thomas Christiano & John Philip Christman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 17--121.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Eric Mack (2009). John Locke. Continuum.
    The second volume in the Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Eric Mack (2009). What is Left in Left-Libertarianism? In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Eric Mack (2007). Scanlon as Natural Rights Theorist. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (1):45-73.
    This article examines the character of Scanlon’s contractualism as presented in What We Owe to Each Other . I offer a range of reasons for thinking of Scanlon’s contractualism as a species of natural rights theorizing. I argue that to affirm the principle that actions are wrongful if and only if they are disallowed by principles that people could not reasonably reject is equivalent to affirming a natural right (of an admittedly non-standard sort) against being subject to such reasonably disallowed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Eric Mack (2006). More Problematic Arguments in Randian Ethics. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 7 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Eric Mack (2006). Non-Absolute Rights and Libertarian Taxation. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (2):109-141.
    Rights-oriented libertarian theory asserts the existence of robust individual rights - including robust rights of property. If these property rights are absolute, then it seems that all taxation is theft. However, it also seems that, if an individual is (faultlessly) in dire straits, it is permissible for him to seize or trespass in order to escape from those straits. It does seem that in this sense property rights are non-absolute. This essay examines what contribution this non-absoluteness of rights makes to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Eric Mack (2006). Rejoinder to Tibor R. Machan, "Rand and Choice" and Frank Bubb, "Did Ayn Rand Do the Shuffle?" (Spring 2006): More Problematic Arguments in Randian Ethics. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 7 (2):287 - 307.
    Frank Bubb and Tibor Machan raise objections to Mack's "Problematic Arguments in Randian Kthics." Bubb argues that a universalization test allows Rand to condemn every parasitic action—even ones that serve the agent's survival. But this universalization test is faulty; it calls upon individuals to act as would be rational if the world were not as it is. Machan argues that Rand can hold that the fundamental choice between life and death is ungrounded without being a subjectivist. But Machan does not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Eric Mack (2005). Prerogatives, Restrictions, and Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):357-393.
    I offer a defense of the moral side-constraints to which Robert Nozick appeals in Anarchy, State and Utopia but for which he fails to provide a sustained justification. I identify a line of anti-consequentialist argumentation which is present in Nozick and which, in the terminology of Samuel Scheffler, moves first to affirm a personal prerogative which allows the individual not to sacrifice herself for the sake of the best overall outcome and second moves on to affirm restrictions (i.e., moral side-constraints) (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Eric Mack (2003). Critical Notice. Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):135-147.
    Natural Goodness, PHILIPPA FOOT. Clarendon Press, 2002, 125 pages. Philippa Foot begins her short but intriguingly rewarding book on Natural Goodness by recounting a story about Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein interrupted a speaker who had realized that he was about to say something that, although it seemed compelling, was clearly ridiculous, and was trying (as we all do in such circumstances) to say something sensible instead. “No,” said Wittgenstein. “Say what you want to say. Be crude and then we shall get on.” (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Eric Mack (2003). Problematic Arguments in Randian Ethics. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 5 (1):1 - 66.
    Mack critically surveys a range of arguments characteristic of Randian writings in ethics (including Craig Biddle's Loving Life). He focuses on "the Shuffle," a set of argumentative moves in which there is illicit shifting back and forth between causal and conceptual understandings and defenses of claims of the form: Man's survival requires man's behaving in manner X (e.g., being rational, being productive). Mack concludes that much Randian argumentation is deeply flawed and urges admirers to discriminate between Rand's genuine individualist ethical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Eric Mack (2002). Equality, Benevolence, and Responsiveness to Agent-Relative Value. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (1):314-341.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Eric Mack (2002). Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this essay, while the anti-egalitarian conclusion is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Eric Mack (2002). Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part II: Challenges to the Self-Ownership Thesis. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (2):237-276.
    Part I of this essay supports the anti-egalitarian conclusion that individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings by criticizing end-state and pattern theories of distributive justice and defending the historical entitlement doctrine of justice in holdings. Part II of this essay focuses on a second route to the anti-egalitarian conclusion. This route combines the self-ownership thesis with a contention that is especially advanced by G.A. Cohen. This is the contention that the anti-egalitarian conclusion can be inferred from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Eric Mack (2000). David Weinstein, Equal Freedom and Utility: Herbert Spencer's Liberal Utilitarianism:Equal Freedom and Utility: Herbert Spencer's Liberal Utilitarianism. Ethics 110 (4):875-877.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Eric Mack (2000). Eric Mack/Christopher W. Morris', an Essay on the Modern State. Noûs 34 (1):153–164.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Eric Mack (2000). In Defense of the Jurisdiction Theory of Rights. Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):71-98.
    This essay critically examines three theories of moral rights, theBenefit, the Interest, and the Choice theories. The Interest andChoice theories attempt to explain how rights can be more robustthan seems possible on the Benefit theory. In particular, moralrights are supposed to be resistant to trade-offs to supportprincipled anti-paternalism, to constitute a distinct dimensionof morality, and to provide right holders with a range ofdiscretionary choice. I argue that these and other featuresare better yet provided by a fourth theory of moral rights, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Eric Mack (2000). Review: Assaying the State. [REVIEW] Noûs 34 (1):153 - 164.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Eric Mack (1999). Higher Superstition. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):138-139.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Eric Mack (1999). In Defense of Individualism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (2):87-115.
    This paper offers a programmatic philosophical articulation of moral and political individualism. This individualism consists of two main components: value individualism and rights individualism. The former is the view that, for each individual, the end which is of ultimate value is his own well-being. Each individual's well-being has ultimate agent-relative value and the only ultimate values are these agent-relative values. The latter view is that individuals possess moral jurisdiction over themselves, i.e., rights of self-ownership. These rights (along with other rights (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Eric Mack (1998). Deontic Restrictions Are Not Agent-Relative Restrictions. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (02):61-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Eric Mack (1997). Book Review:Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality. G. A. Cohen. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (3):517-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Eric Mack (1997). Book Review:Naked Racial Preference: The Case Against Affirmative Action. Carl Cohen. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (2):378-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Eric Mack (1995). Book Review:An Essay on Rights. Hillel Steiner. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (1):194-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Eric Mack (1995). The Self-Ownership Proviso: A New and Improved Lockean Proviso. Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):186-218.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Eric Mack (1993). Sighting Rights. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (4):779 - 791.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Eric Mack (1993). Book Review. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (406):394-397.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Eric Mack (1993). Isaiah Berlin and the Quest for Liberal Pluralism. Public Affairs Quarterly 7 (3):215-230.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Eric Mack (1993). Of Transplants and Trolleys. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):163 - 167.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Eric Mack (1993). Personal Integrity, Practical Recognition, and Rights. The Monist 76 (1):101-118.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Eric Mack (1993). Review: Sighting Rights. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (4):779 - 791.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Eric Mack (1992). Gauthier on Rights and Economic Rent. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (01):171-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Eric Mack (1991). Libertarianism untamed. Journal of Social Philosophy 22 (3):64-72.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Eric Mack (1990). Book Review:The Libertarian Idea. Jan Narveson. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (2):419-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Eric Mack (1990). Self-Ownership and the Right of Property. The Monist 73 (4):519-543.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Eric Mack (1989). Moral Individualism: Agent-Relativity and Deontic Restraints. Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (01):81-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Eric Mack (1985). Ellen Frankel Paul, Jeffrey Paul, and Fred D. Miller, Jr., Eds., Human Rights Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (9):379-382.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Eric Mack (1985). Introduction. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 33:1-8.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Eric Mack (1985). Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War. Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (01):1-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. James P. Sterba, Eric Mack & Michael D. Bayles (1984). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (3):394-397.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eric Mack (1983). Commentary. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (2):35-38.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Eric Mack (1983). Distributive Justice and the Tensions of Lockeanism. Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (01):132-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Eric Mack (1983). Hayek on Justice and the Market: A Reply to MacLeod. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (4):569 - 574.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 60