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Eric S. Nelson [46]Eric Sean Nelson [24]
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Profile: Eric S. Nelson (University of Massachusetts, Lowell)
  1. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Biological and Historical Life: Heidegger Between Levinas and Dilthey. In S. Campbell & P. Bruno (eds.), The Science, Politics, and Ontology of Life-Philosophy. Bloomsbury. 15.
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  2. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Heidegger and Carnap: Disagreeing About Nothing? In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury. 2--151.
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  3. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Heidegger and Dilthey: A Difference in Interpretation. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury. 129.
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  4. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Levinas and Kierkegaard: The Akedah, the Dao, and Aporetic Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):164-184.
    In this article, Kierkegaard's depiction of the teleological suspension of the ethical is contrasted with Levinas's articulation of the emergence of the ethical in the Akedah narrative drawing on Jewish, Christian, and Chinese philosophical and religious perspectives. The narrative of Abraham's binding of Isaac illustrates both the distance and nearness between Kierkegaard and Levinas. Both realize that the encounter with God is a traumatic one that cannot be defined, categorized, or sublimated through ordinary ethical reflection or the everyday social-moral life (...)
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  5. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Recognition and Resentment in the Confucian Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (2):287-306.
    Early Confucian “moral psychology” developed in the context of undoing reactive emotions in order to promote relationships of reciprocal recognition. Early Confucian texts diagnose the pervasiveness of reactive emotions under specific social conditions and respond with the ethical-psychological mandate to counter them in self-cultivation. Undoing negative affects is a basic element of becoming ethically noble, while the ignoble person is fixated on limited self-interested concerns and feelings of being unrecognized. Western ethical theory typically accepts equality and symmetry as conditions of (...)
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  6. Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.) (2013). The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury.
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  7. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Aesthetics, Ethics and Nature in Adorno. In Jerome / Giles Carroll (ed.), Aesthetics and Modernity from Schiller to the Frankfurt School. Peter Lang.
    In response to Jürgen Habermas’s critical assessment of the import of Theodor Adorno’s aesthetics, I revisit Adorno’s aesthetics in the context of the question of whether and to what extent there can be an aesthetics of nature, and the potential ethical and social-political significance of such an aesthetics.
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  8. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Against Liberty: Adorno, Levinas, and the Pathologies of Freedom. Theoria 60 (131):64-83..
    Adorno and Levinas argue from distinct yet intersecting perspectives that there are pathological forms of freedom, formed by systems of power and economic exchange, which legitimate the neglect, exploitation, and domination of others. In this paper, I examine how the works of Adorno and Levinas assist in diagnosing the aporias of liberty in contemporary capitalist societies by providing critical models and strategies for confronting present discourses and systems of freedom that perpetuate unfreedom such as those ideologically expressed in possessive individualist (...)
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  9. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Demystifying Experience: Nothingness and Sacredness in Heidegger and Chan Buddhism. Angelaki 17 (3):65-74.
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  10. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Heidegger, Misch, and the Origins of Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):10-30.
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  11. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Introduction: Intersections Between Chinese and Western Philosophies. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):5-9.
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  12. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Impure Phenomenology. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:19-44.
    Responding to critiques of Dilthey’s interpretive psychology, I revisit its relation with epistemology and the human sciences. Rather than reducing knowledge to psychology and psychology to subjective understanding, Dilthey articulated the epistemic worth of a psychology involving (1) an impure phenomenology of embodied, historically-situated, and worldly consciousness as individually lived yet complicit with its naturally and socially constituted contexts, (2) experience- and communication-oriented processes of interpreting others, (3) the use of third-person structural-functional analysis and causal explanation, and (4) a recognition (...)
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  13. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Levinas and Adorno: Can There Be an Ethics of Nature? In William Edelglass James Hatley & Christian Diehm (eds.), Facing Nature: Levinas and Environmental Thought. Duquesne University Press. 109--133.
  14. Eric S. Nelson (2012). Review of Deborah Cook, Adorno on Nature. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  15. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Introduction: Onto-Hermeneutics, Ethics, and Nature in the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):335-338.
  16. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Individuation, Responsiveness, Translation: Heidegger’s Ethics. In Frank Schalow (ed.), Heidegger, Translation, and the Task of Thinking: Essays in Honor of Parvis Emad. Springer.
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  17. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Kant and China: Aesthetics, Race, and Nature. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):509-525.
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  18. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Revisiting the Dialectic of Environment: Nature as Ideology and Ethics in Adorno and the Frankfurt School. Telos 2011 (155):105-126.
    As a contribution to a critical yet responsive materialist ethics of environments and animals, I reexamine the significance of nature and animals in the critical social theory of Theodor Adorno. In response to the anthropocentric primacy of intersubjective discourse and recognition in recent figures associated with the Frankfurt School, such as Habermas and Honneth, I argue for the ecological import of the aporetic dialectic of nature and society diagnosed in Adorno and Horkheimer’s Dialectic of Enlightenment and Adorno’s later works. Adorno’s (...)
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  19. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Self-Reflection, Interpretation, and Historical Life in Dilthey. In Hans-Ulrich Lessing, Rudolf A. Makkreel & Riccardo Pozzo (eds.), Recent Contributions to Dilthey’s Philosophy of the Human Sciences.
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  20. Eric S. Nelson (2011). The World Picture and its Conflict in Dilthey and Heidegger. Humana.Mente 18:19–38.
  21. Eric S. Nelson (2011). The Yijing and Philosophy: From Leibniz to Derrida. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):377-396.
  22. Eric S. Nelson (2011). Wilhelm Dilthey: Selected Works, Volume II: Understanding the Human World. Edited with Introduction by Rudolf A. Makkreel and Frithjof Rodi. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):471-474.
    Wilhelm Dilthey: Selected Works, Volume II: Understanding the Human World. Edited with Introduction by Rudolf A. Makkreel and Frithjof Rodi Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 471-474 DOI 10.1007/s10746-011-9197-6 Authors Eric S. Nelson, Department of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA, USA Journal Human Studies Online ISSN 1572-851X Print ISSN 0163-8548 Journal Volume Volume 34 Journal Issue Volume 34, Number 4.
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  23. Eric S. Nelson (2011). What Is Enlightenment: Can China Answer Kant's Question? – By Wei Zhang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):666-669.
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  24. Eric S. Nelson (2010). China, Nature, and the Sublime in Kant. In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. 333--348.
  25. Eric S. Nelson (2010). Hermeneutics: Schleiermacher and Dilthey. In Alan D. Schrift & Daniel W. Conway (eds.), History of Continental Philosophy: Volume 2; Nineteenth-Century Philosophy: Revolutionary Responses to the Existing Order. Acumen Press.
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  26. Eric S. Nelson (2010). “Impure Phenomenology: Dilthey, Epistemology, and the Task of Interpretive Psychology. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:19-44.
    Responding to critiques of Dilthey’s interpretive psychology, I revisit its relation with epistemology and the human sciences. Rather than reducing knowledge to psychology and psychology to subjective understanding, Dilthey articulated the epistemic worth of a psychology involving (1) an impure phenomenology of embodied, historically-situated, and worldly consciousness as individually lived yet complicit with its naturally and socially constituted contexts, (2) experience- and communication-oriented processes of interpreting others, (3) the use of third-person structural-functional analysis and causal explanation, and (4) a recognition (...)
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  27. Eric S. Nelson (2010). Language and Emptiness in Chan Buddhism and the Early Heidegger. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):472-492.
  28. Eric S. Nelson (2010). Phenomenology: Dilthey, Epipistemology, and Interpretive Psychology. Studia Phaenomenologica 10 (1):19-44.
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  29. Eric S. Nelson (2010). The Frankfurt School in Exile (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):406-407.
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  30. Eric S. Nelson (2010). Who is the Other to Me? Levinas, Asymmetrical Ethics and Socio-Political Equality. MonoKL 8:454-466.
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  31. Eric S. Nelson (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings (Review). [REVIEW] H-Buddhism.
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  32. Eric S. Nelson (2009). Leibniz and China: Religion, Hermeneutics, and Enlightenment. Religion in the Age of Enlightenment (RAE) 1: 277-300.
  33. Eric S. Nelson (2009). Levinas and Early Confucian Ethics: Religion, Rituality, and the Sources of Morality. Levinas Studies 4:177-207.
  34. Eric S. Nelson (2009). Religious Crisis, Ethical Life, and Kierkegaard’s Critique of Christendom. Acta Kierkegaardiana 4:170-186.
  35. Eric S. Nelson (2009). Traumatic Life: Violence, Pain, and Responsiveness in Heidegger. In Kristen Brown & Bettina Bergo (eds.), The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues. SUNY Press.
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  36. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Encountering Nature. Environmental Philosophy 6 (2):93-96.
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  37. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Review of Lin Ma, Heidegger on East-West Dialogue: Anticipating the Event. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  38. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Responding to Heaven and Earth. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):65-74.
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  39. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism potentially corrects (...)
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  40. Eric S. Nelson (2008). Heidegger and the Ethics of Facticity. In François Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), Rethinking Facticity. SUNY Press.
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  41. Eric S. Nelson (2008). Heidegger and the Questionability of the Ethical. Studia Phaenomenologica 8:395-419.
    Despite Heidegger’s critique of ethics, his use of ethically-inflected language intimates an interpretive ethics of encounter involving self-interpreting agents in their hermeneutical context and the formal indication of factical life as a situated dwelling open to possibilities enacted through practices of care, interpretation, and individuation. Existence is constituted practically in Dasein’s addressing, encountering, and responding to itself, others, and its world. Unlike rule-based or virtue ethics, this ethos of responsive encounter and individuating confrontation challenges any grounding in a determinate or (...)
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  42. Eric S. Nelson (2008). Priestly Power and Damaged Life in Nietzsche and Adorno. In Andreas Urs Sommer (ed.), Nietzsche: Philosoph der Kultur(en)? / Philosopher of Culture? Walter de Gruyter.
  43. Eric S. Nelson (2008). The Secular, the Religious, and the Ethical in Kierkegaard and Levinas. In Claudia Welz & Karl Verstrynge (eds.), Despite Oneself: Subjectivity and its Secret in Kierkegaard and Levinas. Turnshare. 91--109.
  44. Eric Sean Nelson (2008). Interpreting Practice: Dilthey, Epistemology, and the Hermeneutics of Historical Life. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):105-122.
    This paper explores Dilthey’s radical transformation of epistemology and the human sciences through his projects of a critique of historically embodied reason and his hermeneutics of historically mediated life. Answering criticisms that Dilthey overly depends on epistemology, I show how for Dilthey neither philosophy nor the human sciences should be reduced to their theoretical, epistemological, or cognitive dimensions. Dilthey approaches both immediate knowing (Wissen) and theoretical knowledge (Erkenntnis) in the context of a hermeneutical phenomenology of historical life. Knowing is not (...)
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  45. Eric Sean Nelson (2008). Questioning Dao: Skepticism, Mysticism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi. International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association 1:5-19.
  46. Eric Sean Nelson (2008). Schleiermacher and Romanticism. In Hermann Patsch, Hans Dierkes, Terrence N. Tice & Wolfgang Virmond (eds.), Schleiermacher, Romanticism, and the Critical Arts: A Festschrift in Honor of Hermann Patsch. Edwin Mellen Press.
  47. Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.) (2008). Rethinking Facticity. SUNY Press.
    Focusing on the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Lacan, and Fanon, among others, they trace its significance from life-philosophy to ...
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  48. Eric S. Nelson (2007). Disturbing Truth: Art, Finitude, and the Human Sciences in Dilthey. Theory@Buffalo 11:121-142.
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  49. Eric S. Nelson (2007). Empiricism, Facticity, and the Immanence of Life in Dilthey. Pli 18:108-128.
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  50. Eric Sean Nelson (2006). Origins of the Other. Studia Phaenomenologica 6:458-461.
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