Search results for 'Eric S. Williams' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Cyril G. Williams (1976). Eric J. Sharpe and John R. Hinnells (Editors). Man and His Salvation: Studies in Memory of S. G. F. Brandon. Pp. 338. (Manchester University Press, 1973.) £5·40. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 12 (2):265.score: 1890.0
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  2. Ron Williams (2012). Australian Humanist of the Year 2012 Presentation: Ron Williams's Acceptance Speech. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):1.score: 1320.0
    Williams, Ron As I consider the list of previous AHOY recipients since the inaugural award in 1983, I can only say that this is an immeasurable honour. It means much to me because, for almost ten years now, Humanism has been there for my family. In 2005-2006, when separation of church and state school issues first crept into our lives, the Humanist Society of Queensland was to appear as the only beacon of secularist activism upon the deep northern horizon. (...)
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  3. William Williams & Decided May, U.S. Ex Rel. Turner V. Williams, 194 U.S.score: 1260.0
    ‘First. That on October 23, in the city of New York, your relator was arrested by divers persons claiming to be acting by authority of the government of the United States, and was by said persons conveyed to the United States immigration station at Ellis island, in the harbor of New York, and is now there imprisoned by the commissioner of immigration of the port of New York.
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  4. Rowan Williams (2008). Rowan Williams's Homily. The Chesterton Review 34 (3/4):699-701.score: 1260.0
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  5. Eric Tsang & John Williams, Generalization and Hume's Problem of Induction: Misconceptions and Clarifications.score: 900.0
    In Generalizing Generalizability in Information Systems Research Lee and Baskerville (2003) attempt to clarify generalization and distinguish four types of generalization. Although this is a useful objective, what they call generalization is often not generalization at all in the proper sense of the word. We elucidate generalization by locating their major errors. A main source of these is their failure to understand the depth of Hume’s problem of induction. We give a thorough explication of the problem and then give a (...)
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  6. Grant T. Savage, Michele D. Bunn, Barbara Gray, Qian Xiao, Sijun Wang, Elizabeth J. Wilson & Eric S. Williams (2010). Stakeholder Collaboration: Implications for Stakeholder Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (S1):21-26.score: 870.0
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  7. Richard Bett, Christopher Bobonich, David Bostock, Eric A. Brown, John M. Cooper, Dorothea Frede, David Gallop, Jonathan Lear, Nicholas D. Smith, Thomas M. Robinson, Christopher Shields, C. C. W. Taylor, Cass Weller & Bernard Williams (2001). Essays on Plato's Psychology. Lexington Books.score: 810.0
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  8. John N. Williams (2014). Moore's Paradox in Belief and Desire. Acta Analytica 29 (1):1-23.score: 720.0
    Is there a Moore’s paradox in desire? I give a normative explanation of the epistemic irrationality, and hence absurdity, of Moorean belief that builds on Green and Williams’ normative account of absurdity. This explains why Moorean beliefs are normally irrational and thus absurd, while some Moorean beliefs are absurd without being irrational. Then I defend constructing a Moorean desire as the syntactic counterpart of a Moorean belief and distinguish it from a ‘Frankfurt’ conjunction of desires. Next I discuss putative (...)
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  9. John N. Williams (2013). The Completeness of the Pragmatic Solution to Moore's Paradox in Belief: A Reply to Chan. Synthese 190 (12):2457-2476.score: 720.0
    Moore’s paradox in belief is the fact that beliefs of the form ‘ p and I do not believe that p ’ are ‘absurd’ yet possibly true. Writers on the paradox have nearly all taken the absurdity to be a form of irrationality. These include those who give what Timothy Chan calls the ‘pragmatic solution’ to the paradox. This solution turns on the fact that having the Moorean belief falsifies its content. Chan, who also takes the absurdity to be a (...)
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  10. Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.) (2007). Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person. Oxford University Press.score: 640.0
    G. E. Moore observed that to assert, 'I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I don't believe that I did' would be 'absurd'. Over half a century later, such sayings continue to perplex philosophers. In the definitive treatment of the famous paradox, Green and Williams explain its history and relevance and present new essays by leading thinkers in the area.
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  11. Aloysius Martinich, S. Vaughan & D. L. Williams (2008). Hobbes's Religion and Political Philosophy: A Reply to Greg Forster. History of Political Thought 29 (1):49-64.score: 640.0
    A.P. Martinich's interpretation that in Leviathan Thomas Hobbes believed that the laws of nature are the commands of God and that he did not rely on the Bible to prove this has been criticized by Greg Forster in this journal (2003). Forster uses these criticisms to develop his own view that Hobbes was insincere when he professed religious beliefs. We argue that Forster misrepresents Martinich's view, is mistaken about what evidence is relevant to interpreting whether Hobbes was sincere or not, (...)
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  12. Christopher Williams (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Some Questions in Hume's Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):292-295.score: 600.0
    David Hume's relatively short essay 'Of the Standard of Taste' deals with some of the most difficult issues in aesthetic theory. Apart from giving a few pregnant remarks, near the end of his discussion, on the role of morality in aesthetic evaluation, Hume tries to reconcile the idea that tastes are subjective (in the sense of not being answerable to the facts) with the idea that some objects of taste are better than others. 'Tastes', in this context, are the pleasures (...)
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  13. Howard Williams (2013). Review: Louden, Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):154-157.score: 600.0
    Book Reviews Howard Williams, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  14. G. Denny, P. Sundvall, S. J. Thornton, J. Reinarz & A. N. Williams (2010). Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Children's Diets: Is Choice Always in the Patients' Best Interest? Medical Humanities 36 (1):14-18.score: 600.0
    On 29 March 1744, Thomasin Grace, a 13-year-old girl, was the first inpatient admitted to the Northampton General Infirmary (later the Northampton General Hospital). Inpatient hospital diets, then and now, are mainstays of effective patient treatment. In the mid-18th century there were four prescribed diets at Northampton: ‘full’, ‘milk’, ‘dry’ and ‘low’. Previous opinions concerning these four diets were unfavourable, but had not been based upon an individual dietetic assessment. Thomasin would most likely have been given the milk diet, but (...)
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  15. Rueben C. Warren, Luther S. Williams & Wylin D. Wilson (2012). Addressing the Legacy of the U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee: Optimal Health in Health Care Reform Philosophy. Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):496-500.score: 600.0
    This article is guided by principles and practices of bioethics and public health ethics focused on health care reform within the context of promoting Optimal Health. The Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care is moving beyond the traditions of bioethics to incorporate public health ethics and Optimal Health. It is imperative to remember the legacy of the ill-fated research entitled Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. Human participant research and health care must (...)
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  16. Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (2011). Moore's Paradox, Truth and Accuracy. Acta Analytica 26 (3):243-255.score: 580.0
    G. E. Moore famously observed that to assert ‘I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I do not believe that I did’ would be ‘absurd’. Moore calls it a ‘paradox’ that this absurdity persists despite the fact that what I say about myself might be true. Krista Lawlor and John Perry have proposed an explanation of the absurdity that confines itself to semantic notions while eschewing pragmatic ones. We argue that this explanation faces four objections. We give a better (...)
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  17. John N. Williams (2004). Moore's Paradoxes, Evans's Principle and Self-Knowledge. Analysis 64 (284):348-353.score: 540.0
    I supply an argument for Evans's principle that whatever justifies me in believing that p also justifies me in believing that I believe that p. I show how this principle helps explain how I come to know my own beliefs in a way that normally makes me the best authority on them. Then I show how the principle helps to solve Moore's paradoxes.
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  18. John N. Williams (2013). Moore's Paradox and the Priority of Belief Thesis. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):1117-1138.score: 360.0
    Moore’s paradox is the fact that assertions or beliefs such asBangkok is the capital of Thailand but I do not believe that Bangkok is the capital of Thailand or Bangkok is the capital of Thailand but I believe that Bangkok is not the capital of Thailandare ‘absurd’ yet possibly true. The current orthodoxy is that an explanation of the absurdity should first start with belief, on the assumption that once the absurdity in belief has been explained then this will translate (...)
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  19. John Williams & Mitchell S. Green, Introduction to Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality and the First Person.score: 360.0
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  20. John N. Williams (2013). Eliminativism, Dialetheism and Moore's Paradox. Theoria 80 (3).score: 360.0
    John Turri gives an example that he thinks refutes what he takes to be “G. E. Moore's view” that omissive assertions such as “It is raining but I do not believe that it is raining” are “inherently ‘absurd'”. This is that of Ellie, an eliminativist who makes such assertions. Turri thinks that these are perfectly reasonable and not even absurd. Nor does she seem irrational if the sincerity of her assertion requires her to believe its content. A commissive counterpart of (...)
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  21. Peter S. Williams (2010). The Emperor's Incoherent New Clothes – Pointing the Finger at Dawkins' Atheism. Think 9 (24):29-33.score: 360.0
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  22. P. Hubbard, R. Kitchin, G. Valentine, A. Leyshon, R. Lee, C. C. Williams, D. S. Madison, T. Mizuuchi, M. K. Nelson & K. R. Olwig (2005). Broz, S.(2004) Good People in an Evil Time: Portraits of Complicity and Resistance in the Bosnian War (New York: Other Press). Dorling, D.(2005) Human Geography of the UK (London: Sage Publications). Hall, CM & Page, SJ (2002) The Geography of Tourism and Recreation: Environment, Place and Space (2nd Edn.)(New York: Routledge). [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):393.score: 360.0
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  23. Melissa S. Williams (2013). Book Review: In God's Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible by Michael Walzer. [REVIEW] Political Theory 41 (5):769-772.score: 360.0
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  24. John S. Williams (1970). Sartre's Dialectic of History. Renascence 22 (2):59-68.score: 360.0
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  25. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.score: 280.0
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the theological (...)
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  26. William H. Williams (1992). Is Hume's Shade of Blue a Red Herring? Synthese 92 (1):83 - 99.score: 280.0
    The existence of an idea of a missing shade of blue contradicts Hume's first principle that simple ideas all derive from corresponding simple impressions. Hume dismisses the exception to his principle as unimportant. Why does he do so? His later account of distinctions of reason suggests a systematic way of dealing with simple ideas not derived from simple impressions. Why does he not return to the problem of the missing shade, having offered that account? Several suggestions as to Hume's solution (...)
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  27. Michael Williams (1999). Fogelin's Neo-Pyrrhonism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (2):141 – 158.score: 280.0
    Robert Fogelin agrees that arguments for Cartesian sceptism carry a heavy burden of theoretical commitment, for they take for granted, explicitly or implicitly, the foundationalist's idea that experimental knowledge is in some fully general way 'epistemologically prior' to knowledge of the world. He thinks, however, that there is a much more direct and commonsensical route to scepticism. Ordinary knowledge-claims are accepted on the basis of justificatory procedures that fall far short of eliminating all conceivable error-possibilities. As a result, it is (...)
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  28. Garrath Williams, Kant's Account of Reason. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 280.0
    Two of the most prominent questions in Kant's critical philosophy concern reason. The first, central to his theoretical philosophy, is the unprovable pretensions of reason in earlier “rationalist” philosophers, especially Leibniz and Descartes. The second, central to his practical philosophy, is the subservient role accorded to reason by the British empiricists—above all Hume, who declared, “Reason is wholly inactive, and can never be the source of so active a principle as conscience, or a sense of morals.” Treatise, 3.1.1.11; see also (...)
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  29. Garrath Williams (1999). Nietzsche's Response to Kant's Morality. Philosophical Forum 30 (3):201–216.score: 280.0
    Although commentators sometimes mention a link between Kant and Nietzsche, this paper claims that the continuities in their moral thought have been insufficiently explored. I argue that Nietzsche may offer us a profound rethinking of Kant’s morality – one indebted to Kant’s ideal of critique. The paper first considers the wide apparent gulf between the thinkers. The second section seeks to explain this gulf in terms which relate to Kant’s overall project, while the final section deals with Nietzsche’s critique of (...)
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  30. Robert R. Williams (2006). Hegel's Critique of Kant. The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2):9-34.score: 280.0
    This essay examines Hegel’s critique of Kant’s concept of critical philosophy, set forth principally in his Phenomenology of Spirit and Encyclopedia. In the former Hegel presents a hermeneutical critique of Kant, to wit, the concept of critique presupposes a concept of knowledge construed as an instrument. On this assumption the “instrument” of knowledge is supposed to be examined apart from and in advance of its application. But Hegel objects that the underlying conception of knowledge as an instrument undermines the cognitive (...)
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  31. Kevin Williams (2009). Vision and Elusiveness in Philosophy of Education: R. S. Peters on the Legacy of Michael Oakeshott. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):223-240.score: 280.0
    Despite his elusiveness on important issues, there is much in Michael Oakeshott's educational vision that Richard Peters quite rightly wishes to endorse. The main aim of this essay is, however, to consider Peters' justifiable critique of three features of Oakeshott's work. These are (1) the rigidity of his distinction between vocational and university education, (2) the lack of clarity and accuracy in his philosophy of teaching and learning, especially the under-conceptualisation of the role of example in teaching, (3) the over-emphasis (...)
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  32. John Williams (2007). Moore's Paradoxes and Iterated Belief. Journal of Philosophical Research 32:145-168.score: 280.0
    I give an account of the absurdity of Moorean beliefs of the omissive form(om) p and I don’t believe that p,and the commissive form(com) p and I believe that not-p,from which I extract a definition of Moorean absurdity. I then argue for an account of the absurdity of Moorean assertion. After neutralizing two objections to my whole account, I show that Roy Sorensen’s own account of the absurdity of his ‘iterated cases’(om1) p and I don’t believe that I believe that (...)
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  33. Robert R. Williams (2010). Hegel's Concept of The True Infinite. The Owl of Minerva 42 (1-2):89-122.score: 280.0
    According to Hegel, the true infinite is the fundamental concept of philosophy. Yet despite this fact, there is absence of consensus concerning its meaning and significance. The true infinite challenges the currently dominant non-metaphysical interpretations of Hegel, as it challenged the dominance of the Kantian framework in its own day, specifically Kant’s attack on theology and his treatment of theology as a postulate of moralit y. Kant admits that the God-postulate has only subjective necessity and validity, and is an expression (...)
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  34. Robert R. Williams (2010). Hegel's True Infinity As Panentheism. The Owl of Minerva 42 (1-2):137-152.score: 280.0
    Hegel’s True Infinite is “well known” but there is little consensus concerning its meaning. The true infinite is introduced in Hegel’s deconstruction of traditional conceptions of quality, determinacy and reality as wholly positive and from which negation, limitation and determinacy are excluded. Everything is other than and unrelated to everything else. These assumptions yield the stubborn category of finitude as an absolute limit, and of God as abstract unknowable Beyond. But Hegel claims that every attempt to separate the infinite from (...)
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  35. Kevin Williams (1989). The Gift of an Interval: Michael Oakeshott's Idea of a University Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 37 (4):384 - 397.score: 280.0
    (1989). The gift of an interval: Michael Oakeshott's idea of a university education. British Journal of Educational Studies: Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 384-397.
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  36. W. H. Williams (1986). Comment on John Yolton's 'is There a History of Philosophy? Some Difficulties and Suggestions'. Synthese 67 (1):23 - 32.score: 280.0
    In this comment on John Yolton's Is There a History of Philosophy? (Yolton, 1985) I review his account of the development during the 17th to 19th centuries of a common sense of the range of philosophical problems and of the canon of philosophical works. I suggest that his account may be read in light of Rorty's four genres of historiography (Rorty, 1984). I criticize his view of the place of the history of philosophy in philosophy as too timid, though correct (...)
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  37. John Williams, In Defence of an Argument for Evans's Principle 167.score: 280.0
    In this case (5) yields the result that A and D are I-related, but neither is I-related to B or C – the original person has two beginnings of existence. To get round this we need to add to (5)’s right-hand side the condition that there is no pair of distinct, simultaneously occurring person-stages u and v such that u is R-related to x and y and v is R-related to x and no pair of distinct, simultaneously occurring personstages u (...)
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  38. John N. Williams (2007). Moore's Paradox, Evans's Principle, and Iterated Beliefs. In Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.), Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person. Oxford University Press.score: 280.0
  39. Howard Williams (2014). Colonialism in Kant's Political Philosophy. Diametros 39:154-181.score: 280.0
    This article examines the controversy that has arisen concerning the interpretation of Immanuel Kant's account of European colonialism. One the one hand there are those interpreters such as Robert Bernasconi who see Kant's account as all of a piece with his earlier views on race which demonstrate a certain narrow mindedness in relation to black and coloured people and, on the other hand, there are those such as Pauline Kleingeld and Allen Wood who argue that the earlier writings on race (...)
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  40. Garrath Williams (forthcoming). Disclosure and Responsibility in Arendt's The Human Condition. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885114522187.score: 280.0
    Hannah Arendt is one of the few philosophers to examine the dynamics of political action at length. Intriguingly, she emphasises the disclosure of who the actor is as a specific distinction of political action. This emphasis is connected with some long-standing worries about Arendt’s account that centre on its apparent unconcern for political responsibility. In this paper, I argue that Arendt’s emphasis on disclosure actually harbours a profound concern with responsibility. I do so by examining three questions. The main part (...)
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  41. Garrath Williams (2007). Ethics and Human Relationality: Between Arendt's Accounts of Morality. HannahArendt.Net 3.score: 280.0
    This paper considers a short quotation from near the beginnings of Arendt’s Denktagebuch, dated to August 1950. This epigrammatic formulation presages Arendt’s whole political theory, by situating the political outside of the individual, in-between a plurality of human beings. My concern, however, is not with politics as such. Instead, I ask: cannot what Arendt says of politics be said with equal truth of morality? To make some attempt upon this vast question, I examine Arendt’s own more tentative explorations of the (...)
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  42. Nathaniel Williams (2013). George Lippard's Fragile Utopian Future and 1840s American Economic Turmoil. Utopian Studies 24 (2):166-183.score: 280.0
    George Lippard’s 1845 best-selling novel, The Quaker City; or, The Monks of Monk Hall, provides insight into utopian longing in the United States during an era of uncertainty following a major economic crisis. Published in the wake of a banking panic, it portrays class hostilities stemming from notions that the poor were bearing the brunt of economic hardships caused by bad decisions on the part of wealthy investors. Lippard was a serial novelist and social activist who ultimately used his fiction-writing (...)
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  43. Anne Williams (2010). Selecting Barrenness - A Response From Anne Williams. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):29-31.score: 280.0
    A response to Kavita Shah's article Selecting Barrenness.
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  44. Robert R. Williams (1982). Some Uses of Phenomenology in Schleiermacher's Theology. Philosophy Today 26 (2):171-191.score: 280.0
    The general thesis is that schleiermacher anticipated husserlian phenomenological method, Specifically: (1) the redirecting of attention away from second order constructions to the things themselves; (2) the uncovering of the thesis of the natural attitude and its suspension; (3) the phenomenological reduction as an alteration of consciousness which overcomes its naive mundane immersions; and (4) the historical reduction of transcendental philosophy. Such husserlian concepts are concretely explored in reference to schleiermacher's reconstruction of theology and theological method: (1) his "glaubenslehre" as (...)
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  45. A. N. Williams (2007). “To Observe Well … and Thence to Make Himself Rules”: John Locke's Principles and Practice of Child Healthcare. Medical Humanities 33 (1):22-34.score: 280.0
    It is often forgotten that the philosopher John Locke (1632–1704) was a highly regarded physician with a lifelong interest in medicine and was frequently consulted on medical matters, including the health of children. This child health aspect in Locke’s history has been largely ignored, with even modern commentaries on Locke and medicine giving it only a cursory mention. However, it is clear that, in child health, Locke’s influence is far more substantial than GF Still’s and George Jackson’s opinions, which limited (...)
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  46. Gareth D. Williams (2012). The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions'. Oup Usa.score: 280.0
    This book examines the literary and philosophical qualities essential to Seneca's art of science in his Natural Questions. Seneca's meteorological theme raises our gaze from a terrestrial level to a higher, more intuitive plane - a conceptual climb by which Seneca promotes a change of perspective in his readership towards the cosmic viewpoint.
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  47. Robert R. Williams (2002). The Displacement of Recognition by Coercion in Fichte's Grundlage des Naturrechts'. In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), New Essays on Fichte's Later Jena Wissenschaftslehre. Northwestern University Press.score: 280.0
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  48. Meredith Williams (2009). Blind Obedience: The Structure and Content of Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy. Routledge.score: 280.0
    Structure and content of the philosophical investigations -- Wittgenstein's metaphilosophy -- The method of description -- Wittgenstein's distinctive arguments : from mistake to paradox -- Two domains : linguistic mastery vs. initiate learning -- The structure of the book -- Playing the game -- The Fregean picture of language -- Wittgenstein's rejection of Frege's idea -- Builders game : language or signaling? -- Dummett's challenge : sense vs. force -- The domestication of reference -- The problem of normative similarity 1 (...)
     
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  49. Brad Williams (2010). Dissent on Japan's Northern Periphery: Nemuro, the Northern Territories and the Limits of Change in a 'Bureaucrat's Movement'. Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (2):221-244.score: 280.0
    This article sheds light on a relatively unexplored aspect of the Northern Territories dispute by examining the views of residents in Nemuro -- the symbolic frontline in Japan’s Northern Territories Reversion Movement (NTRM). The NTRM began in this northern periphery as a movement of divergent attitudes but was soon coopted by the Japanese government for political reasons. Local opposition to the government’s four island en bloc policy existed in some quarters but was largely kept in check by state largesse. However, (...)
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