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Profile: Eric Stencil (Utah Valley University)
  1. Julie Walsh & Eric Stencil (forthcoming). Malebranche on the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Particular Volitions. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    In this paper, we consider the metaphysics and epistemology of God's particular volitions in Malebranche's philosophy. We focus, in particular, on three candidates of instances of divine particular volitions: creation, original sin, and the Incarnation. We argue that only with an understanding of both the nature of particular volitions and the conditions under which it is possible to have knowledge about the kinds of volitions by which God acts can we appreciate the intersection among the three central features of Malebranche's (...)
     
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  2. Eric Stencil, Antoine Arnauld. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Eric Stencil (2011). Descartes' Deontological Turn: Reason, Will, and Virtue in the Later Writings. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):496-497.
    In this book, Noa Naaman-Zauderer explores the deontological and non-consequentialist dimensions of Descartes’ later writings. Focusing on the role of the will, she argues that Descartes considers the correct use of free will as not merely a means to some other end, but “an end in its own right” (1). She further argues that for Descartes, the role of reason is to govern the “right use” of free will rather than to distinguish truth from falsity (2). Naaman-Zauderer follows Descartes’ deontological (...)
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  4. Eric Stencil (2011). Malebranche and the General Will of God. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1107 - 1129.
    Central to Nicolas Malebranche?s theodicy is the distinction between general volitions and particular volitions. One of the fundamental claims of his theodicy is that although God created a world with suffering and evil, God does not will these things by particular volitions, but only by general volitions. Commentators disagree about how to interpret Malebranche?s distinction. According to the ?general content? interpretation, the difference between general volitions and particular volitions is a difference in content. General volitions have general laws as their (...)
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  5. Eric Stencil (2010). Causation & Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):524-526.
    In Causation & Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy, Walter Ott offers us a fascinating account of the development of theories of causation and laws of nature in the early modern period. The central theme of the book traces the development of two approaches to causation in the period: the “top-down analysis” and the “bottom-up analysis.” According to the former approach, the laws of nature are not “fixed by the natures of the objects they govern.” Rather, the content of (...)
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