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Eric T. Juengst [24]Eric Thomas Juengst [1]
  1.  29 DLs
    Gregory Fowler, Eric T. Juengst & Burke K. Zimmerman (1989). Germ-Line Gene Therapy and the Clinical Ethos of Medical Genetics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (2).
    Although the ability to perform gene therapy in human germ-line cells is still hypothetical, the rate of progress in molecular and cell biology suggests that it will only be a matter of time before reliable clinical techniques will be within reach. Three sets of arguments are commonly advanced against developing those techniques, respectively pointing to the clinical risks, social dangers and better alternatives. In this paper we analyze those arguments from the perspective of the client-centered ethos that traditionally governs practice (...)
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  2.  16 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1998). Groups as Gatekeepers to Genomic Research: Conceptually Confusing, Morally Hazardous, and Practically Useless. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (2):183-200.
    : Some argue that human groups have a stake in the outcome of population-genomics research and that the decision to participate in such research should therefore be subject to group permission. It is not possible, however, to obtain prior group permission, because the actual human groups under study, human demes, are unidentifiable before research begins. Moreover, they lack moral standing. If identifiable social groups with moral standing are used as proxies for demes, group approval could be sought, but at the (...)
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  3.  14 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1997). Can Enhancement Be Distinguished From Prevention in Genetic Medicine? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):125-142.
    In discussions of the ethics of human gene therapy, it has become standard to draw a distinction between the use of human gene transfer techniques to treat health problems and their use to enhance or improve normal human traits. Some dispute the normative force of this distinction by arguing that it is undercut by the legitimate medical use of human gene transfer techniques to prevent disease - such as genetic engineering to bolster immune function, improve the efficiency of DNA repair, (...)
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  4.  13 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1991). Germ-Line Gene Therapy: Back to Basics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (6):587-592.
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  5.  10 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1989). Patterns of Reasoning in Medical Genetics: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (2):101-105.
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  6.  9 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1996). Self-Critical Federal Science? The Ethics Experiment Within the U.S. Human Genome Project. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):63-.
    On October 1, 1988, thirty-five years after co-discovering the structure of the DNA molecule, Dr. James Watson launched an unprecedented experiment in American science policy. In response to a reporter's question at a press conference, he unilaterally set aside 3 to 5 percent of the budget of the newly launched Human Genome Project to support studies of the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. The Human Genome Project , by providing geneticists with the molecular maps (...)
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  7.  8 DLs
    Lynn G. Dressler & Eric T. Juengst (2006). Thresholds and Boundaries in the Disclosure of Individual Genetic Research Results. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):18 – 20.
  8.  7 DLs
    Shawneequa L. Callier, John Huss & Eric T. Juengst (2010). GINA and Preemployment Criminal Background Checks. Hastings Center Report 40 (1):15-19.
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  9.  6 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (2004). FACE Facts: Why Human Genetics Will Always Provoke Bioethics. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 32 (2):267-275.
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  10.  5 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1991). The Human Genome Project and Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (1):71-74.
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  11.  4 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (2000). Commentary: What "Community Review" Can and Cannot Do. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):52-54.
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  12.  3 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst, Michael A. Flatt & Richard A. Settersten (2012). Personalized Genomic Medicine and the Rhetoric of Empowerment. Hastings Center Report 42 (5):34-40.
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  13.  3 DLs
    Gail E. Henderson, Eric T. Juengst, Nancy M. P. King, Kristine Kuczynski & Marsha Michie (2012). What Research Ethics Should Learn From Genomics and Society Research: Lessons From the ELSI Congress of 2011. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (4):1008-1024.
    Research on the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of human genomics has devoted significant attention to the research ethics issues that arise from genomic science as it moves through the translational process. Given the prominence of these issues in today's debates over the state of research ethics overall, these studies are well positioned to contribute important data, contextual considerations, and policy arguments to the wider research ethics community's deliberations, and ultimately to develop a research ethics that can help guide (...)
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  14.  2 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst, Robert H. Binstock, Maxwell Mehlman, Stephen G. Post & Peter Whitehouse (2003). Biogerontology, “Anti‐Aging Medicine,” and the Challenges of Human Enhancement. Hastings Center Report 33 (4):21-30.
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  15.  2 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1990). Social and Conceptual Issues in Human Genetics. Biology and Philosophy 5 (509).
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  16.  2 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1980). Symposium Report. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 1 (3):379-379.
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  17.  2 DLs
    Maxwell J. Mehlman, Jessica W. Berg, Eric T. Juengst & Eric Kodish (2011). Ethical and Legal Issues in Enhancement Research on Human Subjects. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):30--45.
    The United States, along with other nations and international organizations, has developed an elaborate system of ethical norms and legal rules to govern biomedical research using human subjects. These policies govern research that might provide direct health benefits to participants and research in which there is no prospect for participant health benefits. There has been little discussion, however, about how well these rules would apply to research designed to improve participants’ capabilities or characteristics beyond the goal of good health. When (...)
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  18.  1 DLs
    Robert H. Binstock, Eric T. Juengst, Maxwell J. Mehlman & Stephen G. Post (2004). Extraordinary Litmus Tests. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):4-5.
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  19.  1 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (2003). Community Engagement in Genetic Research: The “Slow Code” of Research Ethics? In Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.), Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives. Martinus Nijhoff 181--197.
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  20.  1 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst & Aaron Goldenberg (2008). Genetic Diagnostic, Pedigree, and Screening Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press 298.
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  21.  0 DLs
    Robert H. Binstock, Eric T. Juengst, Maxwell J. Mehlman & Stephen G. Post (forthcoming). Alice Dreger and Bruce Wilson Reply. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  22.  0 DLs
    Eric T. Juengst (1997). Can Prevention Be Distinguished From Enhancement in Genetic Medicine? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22:125-142.
     
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  23.  0 DLs
    Rebecca L. Walker, Eric T. Juengst, Warren Whipple & Arlene M. Davis (2014). Genomic Research with the Newly Dead: A Crossroads for Ethics and Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (2):220-231.
    Recent advances in next generation sequencing along with high hopes for genomic medicine have inspired interest in genomic research with the newly dead. However, applicable law does not adequately determine ethical or policy responses to such research. In this paper we propose that such research stands at a crossroads between other more established biomedical clinical and research practices. In addressing the ethical and policy issues raised by a particular research project within our institution comparatively with these other practices, we illustrate (...)
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  24.  0 DLs
    Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Marcia Van Riper, Rebecca L. Walker & Eric T. Juengst (2015). Looking for Trouble: Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population and the Role of Patient Choice. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):3-14.
    Advances in genomics have led to calls for developing population-based preventive genomic sequencing programs with the goal of identifying genetic health risks in adults without known risk factors. One critical issue for minimizing the harms and maximizing the benefits of PGS is determining the kind and degree of control individuals should have over the generation, use, and handling of their genomic information. In this article we examine whether PGS programs should offer individuals the opportunity to selectively opt out of the (...)
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